US’ First 100,000-Mile Nissan LEAF Owner Receives Multiple Honors in Washington

DEC 16 2013 BY ERIC LOVEDAY 23

Marsh Receives "Washingtonian of the Day" Award from Gov. Inslee - Image Credit: David Laura via Facebook

Marsh Receives “Washingtonian of the Day” Award from Gov. Inslee – Image Credit: David Laur

Today, state of Washington resident Steve Marsh officially the first Nissan LEAF owner in the US to surpass 100,000 miles.

Erik Gottfriend of Nissan Congratulates Steve

Erik Gottfried of Nissan Congratulates Steve – Image Credit: David Laur

Amazingly, it took Marsh only 31 months to achieve this feat.

In celebration of the odometer clicking over to show 100,000, Marsh met in Tumwater, Washington with representatives from Nissan, Washington Governor Jay Inslee, State Transportation Secretary Lynn Peterson and EV drivers in the area who showed up to congratulate Steve.

Quoting Marsh:

“With a daily commute of about 130 miles, I’ve saved more than $9,000 compared to my old gas-powered car since I bought my LEAF.  With plenty of public charging options, as well as a charger installed at my office, my LEAF is a perfect car for my commute.”

Erik Gottfried, director of Electric Vehicle Sales and Marketing at Nissan, commented:

“While many early buyers were excited to buy a LEAF for environmental reasons or to reduce our dependence on foreign oil, Steve Marsh is a prime example of consumers who approach electric cars with a practical mindset.  Most buyers now choose LEAF for the simple economics that Steve recognized right away. Nissan LEAF costs much less to drive and maintain than a gas car yet still provides a great driving experience.”

Governor Jay Inslee remarked:

“Steve Marsh has proven that it’s possible to drive an electric vehicle long distances on Washington’s roads using clean, low-cost electricity.  His dedication to driving electric helps to foster economic growth, reduce our dependence on foreign oil, reduce carbon emissions and preserve our environment for future generations.”

As the images show, Marsh received a “Washingtonian of the Day” award, a commemorative plaque from Nissan a free quick-charge and a title that only Steve will ever hold: World’s first Nissan LEAF driver to surpass 100,000 miles.

*You’ll find a few more specific details on the event in the press release at the bottom of this post.

Plaque Steve Received - Image Credit David Laur via Facebook

Plaque Steve Received – Image Credit David Laur

Odometer Passes 100,000 Miles - Image Credit: David Laur

Odometer Passes 100,000 Miles – Image Credit: David Laur

Press release below:

Washington Nissan LEAF owner celebrates 100,000 all-electric miles

OLYMPIA – Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, state Transportation Secretary Lynn Peterson and representatives from Nissan today joined Steve Marsh of Kent., Wash., to celebrate a unique milestone – 100,000 all-electric miles driven in his Nissan LEAF.

In early 2011, Marsh purchased an all-new Nissan LEAF for his 130-mile roundtrip daily commute. Since then, he has racked up 100,000 miles on the car, using no gasoline, creating no tailpipe emissions and, by his estimation, saving thousands of dollars.

“With a daily commute of about 130 miles, I’ve saved more than $9,000 compared to my old gas-powered car since I bought my LEAF,” said Marsh, who credits Washington’s strong charging infrastructure. “With plenty of public charging options, as well as a charger installed at my office, my LEAF is a perfect car for my commute.”

Marsh was one of the first customers to take delivery of a Nissan LEAF in Washington. A financial controller for Taylor Shellfish, he made the decision to go electric and buy a LEAF primarily based on the car’s low cost of ownership—a benefit that more than 40,000 American LEAF drivers are also now enjoying.

“While many early buyers were excited to buy a LEAF for environmental reasons or to reduce our dependence on foreign oil, Steve Marsh is a prime example of consumers who approach electric cars with a practical mindset,” said Erik Gottfried, director of Electric Vehicle Sales and Marketing at Nissan. “Most buyers now choose LEAF for the simple economics that Steve recognized right away. Nissan LEAF costs much less to drive and maintain than a gas car yet still provides a great driving experience.”

To support residents like Marsh and speed the adoption of electric vehicles in the state, Washington developed one of the country’s most robust EV charging networks. The West Coast Electric Highway opened last year giving EV drivers range confidence that they can find easy and convenient charging along Interstate 5 and other roadways. With a full charge in about 30 minutes, the fast charger at the Tumwater Shell station is a regular stop for Steve Marsh and his son Christopher, making it possible to carpool to work in an all-electric car.

“Steve Marsh has proven that it’s possible to drive an electric vehicle long distances on Washington’s roads using clean, low-cost electricity,” said Gov. Inslee. “His dedication to driving electric helps to foster economic growth, reduce our dependence on foreign oil, reduce carbon emissions and preserve our environment for future generations.”

When Marsh bought his LEAF, he approached his employer to consider installing a charging unit for public use at his Taylor Shellfish office in Shelton. His management quickly agreed it was a good idea, he said, especially since it aligns with the company’s environmental philosophies. His was among the first businesses in the region to install a public charging station. Since then, the company has added charging at its shellfish hatchery in Quilcene, along the Hood Canal.

“It’s exciting to see how this network of charging stations is breaking the range barrier for EV owners,” said Transportation Secretary Peterson who also drives a Nissan LEAF. “It puts Washington’s diverse, natural landscapes in easy reach without vehicle emissions and at a significantly lower cost.”

More than 5,000 plug-in-electric cars are already registered in the state. Washington has among the cleanest and least expensive supply of electricity in the nation, making it an ideal place to drive electric. It’s good for the environment, it’s good for the state, and it’s good for drivers. In addition to the lower operating costs of driving on electricity compared to gasoline, EV drivers also enjoy fewer routine maintenance costs.

Since the launch of Nissan LEAF in December 2010, Nissan has sold more than 40,000 all-electric LEAF cars in the United States and more than 92,000 globally. Through November in 2013, Seattle-Tacoma is one of the top U.S. markets for total LEAF sales with an increase of more than 230 percent over the same period in 2012.

Categories: Nissan

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply

23 Comments on "US’ First 100,000-Mile Nissan LEAF Owner Receives Multiple Honors in Washington"

newest oldest most voted
George B

Awesome! Well deserved recognition for Steve.

Tony Williams

Wonderful way to highlight one of the many advantages of EV driving.

Erik

does seem disingenuous to have the plaque show all capacity bars…

Nate

I like these kind of stories — proves the technology works to people unsure about it.

Assaf

Congratulations and thanks to Steve Marsh!

Silly me, I was worrying this milestone will pass without notice…

Eric Loveday

Nissan would never let it pass without notice. The automaker put out a press release on it. On the flip side, General Motors didn’t say a word about the first Volt owner to go pass 100,000. It took some digging on my behalf, but I managed to get in touch with the 120,000-mile Volt owner just days ago. Really wish GM would have announced it when that Volt driver hit 100,000: http://insideevs.com/chevy-volt-owner-zips-past-120000-miles/

Problem is nobody out there (aside from InsideEVs readers) know that a Volt has exceeded 100,000 miles. Shame on GM for not promoting the Volt and kudos to Nissan for doing what it should.

Jeff Songster

The Volt only did one third of its miles in all electric EV mode…. so does that really count?

Ocean Railroader

This man saved enough gas to fill up a 3333 gallon fish tank or three 1,000 gallon fish tanks which is a good amount of barrels of oil that one guy can save.

Brian

Odd choice to suggest filling fish tanks with gasoline. Remind me not to let you tend to my fish when I go on vacation 😉

A better visual in my mind is that he could fill an 18′ round pool, about 2′ deep with gasoline. That’s a lot of gas.

Abhishekifmr

Awesome.. I hope now Washington will now double the number of vehicles in little time after publishing this story 🙂

MrEnergyCzar

What’s the top mileage on a Tesla S? or Roadster for that matter…

MrEnergyCzar

Assaf

Quite a few Roadsters passed 100k miles. There was an Electric Drive Association survey of drivers. Look up their websites.

As to Model S… given that the oldest ones are barely a year on the road, 100k miles are practically impossible. But we’ll probably hear about the first ones in a year or two…

Assaf

Correction: this study released 5 months ago pegged the highest mileage participating Roadster at 87k miles.
http://www.pluginamerica.org/surveys/batteries/tesla-roadster/PIA-Roadster-Battery-Study.pdf

They (or some non-participating Roadster) might be near or above 100k miles… or Mr. Marsh might now be the world BEV mileage champion, at least for mass-produced models.

Josh Bryant

This guy had 125k miles in a Roadster over a year and a half ago. He is probably pushing 200k miles, unless he traded it in for a Model S.

http://www.tagesanzeiger.ch/auto/kompaktwagen/200-000-Kilometer-unter-Strom/story/29426905

Josephus

I want to know how the range of the battery has been impacted by all those charges and discarges. Should be around 1400 charges.

VFanRJ

It appears from this article Steve’s Leaf has lost 2 bars or a battery loss of greater than 21%

http://insideevs.com/steve-marshs-nissan-leaf-loses-first-battery-capacity-bar-after-record-78600-miles/

Is it next year that Nissan is launching the $100/month battery replacement program? If so, my guess is that Steve will be first in line for a replacement, which hopefully, will have more that 25% more capacity than the battery that came with his Leaf.

All of this is interesting to watch

Ocean Railroader

I wounder would it be possible to buy car grade lithium batteries off the Internet and put them into the Leaf’s battery pack in that a $100 dollars seems like that with falling battery prices across the board is really a money making scam by the car maker.

James

CONGRATULATIONS to Steve Marsh – a fellow Washingtonian!

I still see a gaggle of LEAFs in my area – going to and fro. Sometimes
I go get my mail across the street around 6pm and this silver LEAF
silently glides by. There’s at least 3 at my kid’s elementary school…

I must admit – the more LEAFs I see on the road, the more optimistic
I get that there’s a chance for EVs to break out and become mainstream.

When Governor Inslee was Senator Inslee, I wrote him on several
occasions re: my concerns over this bill or that statute. All I ever got
from him were robo emails telling me how great the article of law was
that he endorsed and I had concerns with. The guy seemed like a
ghost, he was so distant and mysterious from his constituency…. Today,
I know that all I have to do is rack up 100s of thousands of miles in
my EV and I may get a chance to be Washingtonian of The Day!

~ perhaps that way I could meet him and actually tell him what’s on
my mind….

…hmmmm….

JP White

Well done Steve. Here’s looking forward to the 200,000 mile mark before its time to get another 🙂

Bill G.

This is great to hear, but I’m surprised his saving is only $6,000, which is only 6 cents a mile in savings. I’ve driven my i-MiEV about 15,000 miles and compared to my gas-guzzling SUV I’ve saved about $5,000 in fuel costs.

Brian

Depends on what you’re comparing against. Maybe he didn’t replace a gas guzzler. My Leaf costs about 3 cents / mile, and my Insight costs about 9 cents / mile in fuel. That’s a savings of 6 cents / mile when I drive the Leaf.

Bill G.

oops, $9,000 (a little dislexia). Even at that it sounds low.

jstack6

Amazing he didn’t need a new battery pack yet.. Here is the HOT South you can lose 10% or more capacity in one summer. He really should have a Tesla with a commute that long. 130 miles a day is two full changes in a LEAF. It’s also not good to charge during Peak Hours but it does show what can be done.

A Tesla S has a range of 250-300 miles (more if you slow down) and they have FREE Super Chargers all across the USA, 77 at last count. They are all 110% Renewable Energy powered.