White House: 48 EV Charging Corridors To Be Set Up Over 35 States, 25,000 Miles

NOV 3 2016 BY JAY COLE 67

White House lays the groundwork for US charging network

White House lays the groundwork for US charging network

The White House put out a “to do” list of projects in the zero emission space today, including the establishment of 48 national EV corridors over 35 states and 25,000 miles to help speed the deployment of electric vehicles in America.

Why do this?  And why now?

“The Obama Administration is committed to taking responsible steps to combat climate change, increase access to clean energy technologies, and reduce our dependence on oil.”

Good enough.

Charging stops to be every 50 miles on major routes

Charging stops to be every 50 miles on major routes

Here are the major bullet points from the White House this morning:

  • For the first time, the United State Department of Transportation (DOT) is establishing 48 national electric vehicle charging corridors on our highways, these newly designated electric vehicle routes cover nearly 25,000 miles, in 35 states.
  • 28 states, utilities, vehicle manufactures, and change organizations are committing to accelerate the deployment of electric vehicle charging infrastructure on the DOT’s corridors;
  • 24 state and local governments are committing to partner with the Administration and increase the procurement of electric vehicles in their fleets;
  • The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting two studies to evaluate the optimal national electric vehicle charging deployment scenarios, including along DOT’s designated fueling corridors; and
  • 38 new businesses, non-profits, universities, and utilities are signing on to DOE’s Workplace Charging Challenge and committing to provide EV charging access for their workforce.

At the same time, the Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration announced that 55 Interstate highways in total will be “alternative-fuel corridors” and of those, 48 are to be specific electric-car corridors.

Charging stop to be every ~50 miles on new routes...enabling use (in theory) by all production EVs on the road today

Charging stop to be every ~50 miles on new routes…enabling use (in theory) by all production EVs on the road today

On these routes charging station will be plotted every ~50 miles, and will include both existing stations already properly placed and new installations.

Further to that, actual details are sparse, so we are not sure of the charging standard (although most likely they will be require to be dual standard in the case of DC fast charging options), the same goes for power level requirements of the system, or financing of the project in total.  We would hope that at least some of the more heavy traveled routes, the system would be “future proofed” with some 150 kW spots that could handle multiple EVs at the same time, with different charging standards.


Here is the official announcement (while one can see the plans at the state level here):

Obama Administration Announces New Actions To Accelerate The Deployment of Electrical Vehicles and Charging Infrastructure

Today’s Actions include the Designation of 48 National Electric Vehicle Charging Corridors on our Highways

The Obama Administration is committed to taking responsible steps to combat climate change, increase access to clean energy technologies, and reduce our dependence on oil. Already, in the past eight years the number of plug-in electric vehicle models has increased from one to more than 20, battery costs have decreased 70 percent, and we have increased the number of electric vehicle charging stations from less than 500 in 2008 to more than 16,000 today – a 40 fold increase. But there is more work to do. That is why, today, the Administration is announcing key steps forward to accelerate the utilization of electric vehicles and the charging infrastructure needed to support them.

By working together across the Federal government and with the private sector, we can ensure that electric vehicle drivers have access to charging stations at home, at work, and on the road – creating a new way of thinking about transportation that will drive America forward. Today’s announcements demonstrate a continued partnership between the Administration, states, localities, and the private sector to achieve these shared goals:

  • For the first time, the United State Department of Transportation (DOT) is establishing 48 national electric vehicle charging corridors on our highways, these newly designated electric vehicle routes cover nearly 25,000 miles, in 35 states.
  • 28 states, utilities, vehicle manufactures, and change organizations are committing to accelerate the deployment of electric vehicle charging infrastructure on the DOT’s corridors;
  • 24 state and local governments are committing to partner with the Administration and increase the procurement of electric vehicles in their fleets;
  • The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting two studies to evaluate the optimal national electric vehicle charging deployment scenarios, including along DOT’s designated fueling corridors; and
  • 38 new businesses, non-profits, universities, and utilities are signing on to DOE’s Workplace Charging Challenge and committing to provide EV charging access for their workforce.

Today’s announcements build on a record of progress from multiple programs across the Administration that work to scale up EVs and fueling infrastructure, including at the Departments of Energy, Transportation, Defense, the Environmental Protection Agency and with the private sector. This summer, the Administration opened up to $4.5 billion in loan guarantees to support the commercial-scale deployment of innovative electric vehicle charging facilities and in collaboration with the Administration, nearly 50 industry members signed on to the Guiding Principles to Promote Electric Vehicles and Charging Infrastructure. This effort launched the beginning of a collaboration between the government and industry to increase the deployment of EV charging infrastructure that is carried forward in the announcements today.

ADVANCING THE DEPLOYMENT OF ELECTRIC VEHICLE CHARGING INFRASTRUCTURE ALONG OUR HIGHWAYS

Establishing 48 National Electric Vehicle Charging Corridors on our Highways: The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) today announced 55 Interstates that will serve as the basis for a national network of “alternative fuel” corridors spanning 35 states plus the District of Columbia. Today’s announcement includes designating 48  out of the 55 routes electric vehicle charging corridors, totaling almost 25,000 miles of electric vehicle routes in 35 states. To make it easier for drivers to identify and locate charging stations, states designated as “sign-ready” are authorized to use signs developed by FHWA that identify electric vehicle charging stations and other alternative fuels along the highways similar to existing signage that alerts drivers to gas stations, food, and lodging. Drivers can expect either existing or planned charging stations within every 50 miles.

28 States, Utilities, Vehicle Manufactures, and Change Organizations Commit to Accelerate Electric Vehicle Deployment on DOT’s Corridors: Today, the following organizations are committing to help accelerate the deployment of electric vehicle charging infrastructure along the Alternative Fuel Corridors designated by the U.S. Department of Transportation.  These initial and future corridors will serve as a basis for a national network of electric vehicle charging infrastructure to enable coast to coast zero emission mobility on our nation’s highways:

  • Ameren Missouri
  • Berkshire Hathaway Energy
  • BMW
  • ChargePoint
  • Connecticut Green Bank
  • Edison Electric Institute
  • Electric Drive Transportation Association
  • EV Connect
  • Eversource Energy
  • EVgo
  • General Electric
  • General Motors
  • Greenlots
  • Kansas City Power & Light
  • MidAmerican Energy Company
  • New York State
  • Nissan
  • NV Energy
  • Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E)
  • Pacific Power
  • PlugShare
  • Portland General Electric
  • Public Service Company of New Mexico
  • Rocky Mountain Power
  • Skychargers
  • Southern California Edison
  • Texas-New Mexico Power
  • Vision Ridge Partners

Conducting Two Studies to Evaluate the Optimal National EV Charging Deployment Scenarios: Early next year, DOE plans to publish two studies developed with national laboratories and with input from a range of stakeholders to support broad EV charging infrastructure deployment, including along DOT’s alternative fuel corridors.  The first is a national EV infrastructure analysis that identifies the optimal number of charging stations for different EV market penetration scenarios. The second will provide best practices for EV fast charging installation, including system specifications as well as siting, power availability, and capital and maintenance cost considerations.

Continuing to Partner with Stakeholders to Build Charging Infrastructure Along the National Charging Corridors: The White House will be convening key stakeholders in November 2016 to continue to encourage state and local governments and businesses to build public electric vehicle charging infrastructure along our national highways.

SUPPORTING STATE AND LOCAL PARTNERSHIPS TO INCREASE THE ELECTRIC VEHICLES ON THE ROAD 

Partnering with 24 State and Local Governments to Electrify our Vehicle Fleets: Building on the Administration’s policy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) from Federal Fleets by 30 percent by 2025, today, we are announcing twenty-four state and local governments have joined the Federal government to electrify our fleets. These new commitments will account for over 2,500 new electric vehicles in 2017 alone, and help pave a path for a sustained level of purchases into the future. By working together, Federal, state and local leadership can aggregate demand to lower purchase costs through increasing automotive manufactures’ demand certainty, promote electric vehicle innovation and adoption and expand our national electric vehicle infrastructure. The cumulative benefit of the commitments announced today include more than one million dollars and 1,211,650 gallons in potential annual fuel savings.

Click here to see state level initiatives.

Hat tip to Eric M!  (because he was first with the tip, but also thanks to several other IEV readers that followed shortly thereafter)

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67 Comments on "White House: 48 EV Charging Corridors To Be Set Up Over 35 States, 25,000 Miles"

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This will bring some much needed attention to drivers who might not realize that EV plugs are basically all over the place now.

The map for the EV corridors list signs as “ready” for the route between Dallas and Austin. I’m not sure if that means they consider it to be sufficiently built out?

http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/environment/alternative_fuel_corridors/maps/

If they do, then while a Bolt or Tesla could easily make the trip, I don’t think there are EV chargers every 50 miles. And I’m positive there are not DC chargers every 50 miles.

From last CCS charger in the outskirts of DFW to the first CCS charger on the outskirts of Austin is at least 150 miles. There is one CHAdeMO and one Supercharger in between. But maybe there are more soon to be installed?

I really want some installs between Dallas and Houston so there is a more direct route than going through College Station.

Yeah.. Definitely NOT ready.. It is BARELY possible to make it from Dallas to Austin in an EV and that is with some long waits at some L2 stations. The best I can tell, Dallas to Houston is not even possible except in a Tesla.

Yeah I agree, I hope Dallas to Austin isn’t considered ‘ready’.

And Dallas to Houston isn’t possible with 100-mile EV’s. The Chevy Bolt will be possible.

Some brave souls could try hypermiling on 45 with the Bolt. But once I get my Bolt, I’ll be driving a little out of the way and stop in College Station for a 2 hour charge to avoid the stress. 🙂

If this is on top of thw VW is having to dish out then that’s friggin awesome.

If this is what VW is having to dish out then shame on the gooberment for making it look like they’re funding it all.

They need more than 3-4 charge ports at shopping malls where people spend at least 1.5hrs there. At least 8 charge ports L2 6.6KW. I hate going there “but when I do” it’s at least 1.5hrs with no Dos Equis. I’m thirsty my friend.

What’s weird is some Jr Colleges have more charge ports than UC or State colleges. One State college I visited had only 2 ports in the garage!

It only lists BMW GM and Nissan so it should be in addition to what VW deploys…
But hopefuly they will work in conjunction with VW and they will roll out corridors on other freeways…
Hopefuly they follow Teslas lead and do only DCQC and future proof it with multiple stations at every location…

My Alma mater, UTD, technically has 8 charging stations (as well some places near just regular outlets for trickle charging. But usually University vehicles are plugged into those.)

But all of the charging stations are Blink. So at any given time, only 3 or 4 of the stations actually work.

But but but then I won’t be able to tell everybody else that Tesla’s are the best because they have the Supercharger network 🙁

Until there’s another car or DCFC deployed and that can charge faster than Tesla’s 120KW (something tells me it might be faster than that, maybe), they get to keep the “Super” part of it……lol

No need to fret just go with whatever comes off the top and if that fails feel free to make stuff up…

Paid for by VW?

That’s my expectation. This adds up to 500 stations across some of the contiguous 48 states, or roughly how many Supercharger stations Tesla had globally a year ago. $4.5 billion dollars means $9M per station, which is outrageously expensive. The average site price of a Tesla Supercharger site is $300,000 or so, with a typical minimum of four stalls, and six being the average (currently). Either each station is providing 180 stalls each, or that $4.5 Billion is serving multiple purposes. Or, the government money is not being spent well. Yeah, option 3.
I sincerely hope these systems are not woefully obsolete before they are built. CHAdeMO at 65kw and CCS at 50 kw is far too slow for long-distance trips, given that recharging is a non-linear curve. Maybe this turns into a charging standard war finally. CCS upped to a higher kw rating makes the most sense.

I can pretty much guarantee there will price gouging and the gooberment will pay it.

The DC quick chargers that can charge a Chamo and CSS car at a time cost $45,000 to $60,000 each with the bulk of the work going to utility transformer hook up.

Yes, they are expensive. Also, CHAdeMO is stepping up to 150 kW as well, not just CCS.

Yeah, dollars? What was the sum for this initiative? Chargepoint and Tesla both only have <500mm invested. VW crashes the party with up to 2,000mm (ok, 2bb).

The encouraging thing is "corridors" pretty much spell out DCFC, and federally supported highways may be a better place for them to invest. Hope they're reliable.

BMW, GM, Nissan are on the list, but no Ford nor Tesla. What’s up with that?

Yep the three legacy auto companies most commited to EVs are helping to fund…

Ford? Dodge? Toyota? Honda? Hyundai? Etc? Well I guess we know their EV commitment so far hasnt really changed…

That Fiat would not want to commit 100% to supporting better charging infrastructure is a total surprise to me!

I’m shocked – SHOCKED!!! o_o

Well, not that shocked…

Because Tesla got its own network.

BMW, GM and Nissan are the ones with the products that actually would benefit from it. And they are planning to release their version of BEVs that would depend on it.

The rest of them that don’t participate because they don’t plan to release a car that need it anytime soon.

Ford is to release DCFC capable EV next year, and I thought they’d be interested.

This is white house stuff, so it’s independent of company. As such, I thought Tesla would be interested, too.

Well, remember that Teslas can accept Chademo charging, with an adapter. So, they don’t really NEED to be part f the discussions.

Well, remember that Teslas can accept Chademo charging, with an adapter. So, they don’t really NEED to be part of the discussions.

Here’s a map of the corridors. I see some areas lacking. Personally I’d like to see them follow I-75 from North to South.

Thanks for posting that map Kdawg! I would describe the coverage indicated as woefully inadequate.

Having a charger every 50 miles is kind of worthless. The reason why is if it’s broke or filled up with car charging you can’t drive to the next one if you are in a hundred mile range EV.

For this system to be useful there has to be a charger every five to ten miles.

Or, y’know, they could actually have more than one charger at each location. Vexar posted above that Telsa currently averages 6 stalls per location. Obviously that’s not enough to support a large fleet, but at least it’s a start.

Yes, most definitely 2 fast chargers would be the expected minimum per location.

I hope they stick w/the Tesla model with 6 or 8 per location. That way you have a better chance of one being available. Even better is to put all of their up-to-the-minute statuses online so you can check ahead of time if spots are open.

Yes, certainly some way of seeing status.

We will see how things start out Kwawg. Two fast chargers minimum is going to be plenty for awhile at most of these Interstate locations. As more EVs demand more fast chargers then they can be added.

I know right. Nothing on the 10 between TX and CA?? WTH

Hopefuly VW fills in the blank spots…

SparkEV-Fiat500-Leased - M3 Reserved - Bolt- TBD

Looks like there’s a state component to this as clear state line cut offs are notable az/nm/fl/

Yes kdawg. Thx for posting that. As much as this sounds like a good thing It’s got boondoggle writen all over it. I’m just glad I’m in on the Tesla network is all I can say. It works great. Properly placed chargers that always are working. If one is down it shows up on your Tesla in car Nav screen…. Oh that’s right I forgot. I’m constantly reminded by people that don’t have EVs that the in car Nav is not needed. All you need is a smart phone.

Wow, the “loneliest road in America” is covered.

That is the US50 across Nevada.

Almost looks like red states vs blue states, except having a path from Texas.

Press release notes that this network is only 25,000 miles of a possible 85,000 miles and other gov sites note that the network will expand in the future.

Everyone should step off their jump to conclusions mat for a moment.

It won’t work if prices aren’t kind of regulated, some charging stations can go from 18 cents up to 75 cents per Kw/h, this is just crazy.

Oh, get over yourself! If you’re out in the middle of the desert and there is only one watering hole, do you complain about the cost of water? No, you pay the price and move on.

When people see the chargers excessively over priced, even when it is out in the middle of the desert, they go ahead and pay it this one time but then it’s stuck in their head and next time they say “screw it, I’ll just take the gas car instead since it is cheaper than the EV at those stops!”

That philosophy DOES NOT WORK! Regardless of the cost of the infrastructure, they can’t set the prices to be higher than gas. Period.

No US Hwy 395 through California, Oregon, and Washington. Doesn’t do me any good.

Seriously! Even though the 395 doesn’t receive the traffic other corridors receive, it is still useful.

Hwy 395 would be great! How do we lobby Sacramento to bring it online?

Wow.. Looks like most of Texas will finally be covered! that will be fantastic!

What is the distinction between “Signage Ready” and “Signage Pending”? I couldn’t find a description anywhere.

I really hope they are not thinking about using the existing random system of single far spaced quick chargers at car dealerships to make a highway get the sign.

Personally the standards I would use is it would have to charge five cars at once. A station would also have to be open 24 hours a day and at least ten to five miles apart.

When I read the link at the source government site, it appears to simply be stretches of road that have at least a DCFC or Level 2 charger spaced no more than 50 miles apart on the highway, and 5 miles from the highway. It also specifically excludes Tesla chargers since they’re proprietary.

While that may sound pretty discouraging and a bit of lip service (Level 2, really?) I still have no idea what “Signage-Ready” versus “Signage-Pending” means though, haha.

The map looks like the national railway map after first transcontinental railroad was built. And we all know what happened with the railroad network after that. Sure there are a lot of gaps but this is only the beginning.

A lot of these corridors are sign ready pending. That means that someone is planning to install chargers along those corridors and we know it’s not going to the transportation departments. I would like to know how the transportation departments found out that service providers are going to install chargers along corridors because we customers can’t find out.

Because of permits and zoning requests.

The mighty US Government is going to put up signs and conduct two studies? Oil is DOOMED!

Don’t worry 99% of American car owners have gas guzzling pollution machines. Heck in my state of Florida there isn’t an electric corridor probably due to pollution loving Republican state government refusing to work with the devil Obama. Funny thing is the same pollution loving Republicans will go hat in hand to ask for federal money when sea-level rise causes home insurance rates to rise in coastal areas, they love free money.

What I find out is how a quick charger corrdor will start up randomly on a major interstate then go for fifty or sixty miles and then end.

I was at least expecting it to go none stop on Interstates 10, 70 and 90 along with all of Interstate 95 along all of them.

So according to the article, this is to be overseen by, and at least partially funded by, the DOE. Just how much of the DOE’s budget is discretionary spending? And just how much can they get done on this between now and the end of Obama’s term?

Of course, we can hope that if Hilary is elected, she’ll continue to push for it. But I question that much of this can be accomplished without Congress voting funding for it…

…unless this is what the Volkswagen fine is to be used for. If so, then I respectfully disagree with Trollnonymous; I think that would be great! Certainly a much better use of those funds than the suggestion that the money be divided up among existing for-profit EV charging companies.

Establishing nationally planned “national EV corridors” is exactly what we need. It looks like the same approach as the U.S. national highway system. Dividing up the funds and using them piecemeal, a bit here and a bit there, would be as bad and haphazard as the road system that existed in the USA before the national highway system. (And I don’t mean the Interstate system. The national highway system predates that.)

New chargers should all be Combo Chargers(CCS), since all new long range 200+ mile EV(Model 3/Bolt) should CCS since it is the standard in NA. Besides Tesla.

It’s rather illogical for someone to buy a sub or barely 100 mile EV and attempt to travel across country, when 200+ mile EVs will be available and about the same price. The sub 100 mile EVs will work well as commuter cars in the city.

Who in their right mind would, on purpose, drive 50 miles, charge for 30 minutes, drive 50 miles, charge for 30 minutes, drive 50 miles, charge for 30 minutes, and do that again, just to go 200 miles. When they could just buy a 200+ mile EV and charge once at the destination point.

Attempting to travel across the country in a sub 100 mile EV is like buying an older cell phone with 1 hour of charge, and constantly racing to the next plug to get power, when there are new 12 hour charge phones available for a similar price.

The new EV Charging Corridors will be designed for the future of electric vehicles, not a bandaid to drag old tech along.

Leaf 2.0

60kWh, CHAdeMO.

Citation needed

Well, for one thing.. You assume that would be for a cross-country trip. But I could easily see somebody using a 100-mile vehicle to go from Dallas to Austin. They might need to charge twice during the trip. That’s an acceptable amount for a trip like that. I would call that a regional trip, though.

My question would be………if they were driving a gasoline car, would it be acceptable to stop twice or three times, 30 minutes at a time to get gas on such a short trip? I wouldn’t think so.

The 200+ mile trip without a stop is about 3 hours. Add charging and it goes to 4.5 to 5+ hours.

Or…they could just upgrade to a longer range EV. The key is buying the right range EV for the person’s needs. EVs are evolving so quickly soon there will really be no need to sacrifice time/lifestyle to drive one.

Very well said Bloggin. 50 mile apart fast charger locations are fine for 80-100 mile EVs to use regionally to some extent, but most consumers will want to have a stopping and driving schedule like what Tesla EVs have now for travel of any significant distance.

If there is a oil doomsday such as some kind extreme sudden peak oil event that we don’t know about. Or if the Middle East has a nuclear war and somehow wreaks 40% of global oil production in a few days.

Then you will you see people like me attempt to drive across the county in a Mitsubishi i-miev due to people like me not having $40,000 or $80,000 to buy a new car.

Only 24 state and local governments are involved…pitiful very pitiful indeed. Wake up America pull your heads out of your arse.

Yeah … that’s not really helpful.

Please pretty please with sugar on top…pull your heads out of your arse and choose less pollution.

Very sad in some ways.

This initiative and its proposed corridors could be overlaid with a Red/Blue states map to see how few of the Red States are opting in.

All I can say is GET OUT AND VOTE people or risk a YUGE slowing down and maybe even reversing of the progress made so far.

But building the YUGE wall will create jobs and AMERICA will be GREAT AGAIN…until American farmers can’t find cheap labor and crops rot, farmers go bankrupt, and the wall is demolished LOL that’s why I’m voting for Hillary to avoid the insanity.

Quote: “We would hope that at least some of the more heavy traveled routes, the system would be “future proofed” with some 150 kW spots that could handle multiple EVs at the same time, with different charging standards.”

How is 150 kW future proof?

Ultra E, a project born out of an alliance between European carmakers, utilities and other companies, announced 2 weeks ago the deployment of 25 new charging stations for electric vehicles along the trans-European transport network (TEN-T): https://electrek.co/2016/10/18/new-ultra-fast-charging-350-kw-stations-evs-europe-audi-bmw/

And why haven’t InsideEVs written an article about the European 350 kW network yet?

Future proofing probably means planning ahead for the higher capacity needed with regards to the grid connection. A location like that will also have plenty of space for adding fast chargers later some being higher kW ones, whether they be 150 or 350 kW.