Watch Bollinger B1 Boogie On The Track, Get Technically Animated

2 months ago by Domenick Yoney 14

Maybe it’s hip to be square after all.

Any excuse to talk about the super square, hyper utilitarian Bollinger B1 is a good excuse.  A pair of videos demonstrating the vehicle at speed might be the best excuse. In fact, the only way to top that would be to add a third video that animates the B1 being assembled from the ground up. If you feel the same, then today is your lucky day.

Bollinger B1 technical animation gets, um, technical.

The Bollinger crew took its prototype to the New York Safety Track in Harpersfield, New York and let it stretch its considerable legs on the 2.1-mile circuit. We love this thing, despite its brick-like aerodynamics, but it helps¬†knowing that its shape doesn’t seem to slow its hustle much. Despite its bulk and mud-terrain tires, it seems nimble enough to handle the highway as well as it might a low-speed trail through the woods. We only wish we could hear more of the motors and other natural noises, but essentially, this is marketing material so there’s music laid over everything.

After watching the two racetrack clips, make sure to scroll down for a cool-down lap: a two minute, twenty seconds animation that builds the case for this all-electric sport utility truck by tearing it down to its aluminum frame and building it back up again, showing how the various components fit within the chassis, along with lots of eye-popping technical numbers. Four-stage, two-speed helical gear reduction? Yeah, baby!

Source: YouTube

Tags: , , , , , ,

14 responses to "Watch Bollinger B1 Boogie On The Track, Get Technically Animated"

  1. MTN Ranger says:

    That frunk is huge. Nice Jeep Wrangler-size EV equivalent. Looks like it would be fun.

  2. David Murray says:

    I wonder if Jeep is worried about this?

    1. DJ says:

      Seeing as you have to have a commercial drivers license to drive one I doubt it.

      1. EVShopper says:

        Why would you need a commercial license to drive it?

        1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

          Because it’s built and classed as a Class 3 heavy truck, despite being sized like a Jeep. That classification allows Bollinger to make the vehicle street-legal while still ignoring certain safety requirements for passenger cars and light trucks.

          However, if it’s intended primarily for offroad use, at construction sites and the like, then the requirement for a commercial driver’s license may not be such a barrier to sales. I’m not at all sure about this, but my guess is that anybody could drive the truck offroad, and you’d only need a commercial driver’s license to drive the truck on public roads from one site to another.

          http://insideevs.com/bollinger-b1s-weight-electric-truck/

          1. gary says:

            I don’t know where you see a 10K lb GVW truck requires a special license.
            Others in that class:
            Ram 3500, GMC Sierra 3500, Ford E-350, Ford F-350, Hummer H1
            AFIK, a standard DL allows you to operate any of these.

          2. peetah says:

            as long as its for personal use its fine…if its used to make money like to tow things from A to B then you need a CDL.

            i know this because i had an M923A2 5 ton truck (basically a semi) as a daily driver for over a year.

      2. wavelet says:

        Bzzt.
        In the vast majority of US states, a standard car driver’s license allows you to drive any vehicle with a GVWR of up to 26000lbs.
        This is in strong contrast to the rest of the world, where a normal license is only good for 3.5 or 4 metric tons, ~7700/8800lbs.
        (I personally think the US limits are a travesty — a 10K lbs truck drives very different from a 3000lbs car — and I’d require a special license for anything above 5000lbs curb weight).

      3. Helder Sepulveda says:

        I think it depends on the regulations of the state, for example Florida:
        http://www.flhsmv.gov/ddl/dlclass.html

        There are a few exceptions that can apply:
        – Farmers transporting farm supplies or farm machinery, or transporting agricultural products to or from the first place of storage or processing or directly to or from market, within 150 miles of their farm; or
        – Drivers of recreational vehicles used for recreational purposes; or
        – Drivers who operate straight trucks (single units) that are exclusively transporting their own tangible personal property which is not for sale.

  3. vazzedUp says:

    When is the offroad video coming :o)

  4. Paul K says:

    And people criticize the appearance of my 2016 Leaf. I love the idea of this vehicle. Kind of like me. Not much to look at. Gets the job done. Hope it works out for them. If I could use one of these and could afford one I’d go for it. I love ugly!

  5. EVShopper says:

    I really love this truck.

  6. Steven says:

    A.) I’m not it’s target market.
    B.) That doesn’t matter.
    C.) If they can deliver it, they will sell out.
    D.) I wish them the best of luck with it.

  7. islandboy says:

    It’s silhouette reminds very much of the latest versions of the original Land Rover a.k.a. thde Land Rover Defender circa 1983-2016. It’s a lot bigger though!

Leave a Reply