Volkswagen’s Holistic Approach To Low Carbon Mobility – Automaker Promises To Invest $10 Million Into U.S. Charging Infrastructure

JUL 1 2015 BY MIKE ANTHONY 14

Volkswagen e-Golf

Volkswagen e-Golf

Volkswagen is taking multiple steps to approach ultra-low-carbon mobility.

This will be achieved in a number of ways. One method is by investing in “carbon reduction projects across the country to offset emissions created from e-Golf production, distribution, and up to approximately 36,000 miles of driving.”

Joerg Sommer, vice president of product marketing, Volkswagen of America, added:

Volkswagen e-Golf

Volkswagen e-Golf

“Volkswagen feels it is important to look beyond the benefits of driving a vehicle without tailpipe emissions and to take a holistic approach to e-mobility. The carbon offset program is a key element of Volkswagen’s holistic approach to e-Mobility. e-Golf customers can drive the vehicle confidently, knowing Volkswagen is addressing the vehicle’s environmental impacts through many stages of its lifecycle from production, distribution and charging.”

Volkswagen has also teamed up with 3Degrees,a renewable energy and carbon offset services provider. This will benefit the cause, as the two will work together to further reduce carbon footprint.

The projects do not stop there. There will also be:

Garcia River Forestry Project
The Garcia River Conservation-Based Forest Management Project, located in Mendocino County, Calif., protects and preserves a 24,000-acre native redwood forest, increasing carbon sequestration and storage, while also helping to restore the natural wildlife habitat. Emission reductions produced by the project are verified by an approved third party and registered with the Climate Action Reserve. 

Big River and Salmon Creek Forests
The Big River and Salmon Creek Forests, located in Mendocino County, Calif., were subject historically to land fragmentation and unsustainable logging practices. In an effort to protect the native redwood and Douglas fir forest, the land is now protected through a 16,000-acre land purchase, which was funded in part by the carbon offsets it offers to organizations like Volkswagen. Emissions reductions produced by the project are verified by an approved third party and registered with the Climate Action Reserve. 

McKinney Landfill
The McKinney Landfill project, based at a closed landfill in McKinney, Texas, works to capture gases that would otherwise be emitted into the atmosphere from anaerobic decomposition within the landfill. Benefits from the capture include odor reduction, improved water quality and future distributed renewable energy production. The sale of carbon offsets supports the gas collection and flaring project. The emission reductions are validated, verified and registered using the Climate Action Reserve’s Landfill Project Protocol.”

Volkswagen C Coupé GTE Plug-in hybrid. Also will reduce carbon impact.

Volkswagen C Coupé GTE Plug-in hybrid. Also will reduce carbon impact.

Steve McDougal, President of 3Degrees states:

“Volkswagen is showing leadership by including carbon offsets as standard with this e-Golf electric vehicle. As more people choose low and no emission cars, Volkswagen is making it possible—and easy—to think comprehensively about the greenhouse gas emissions profile of a vehicle.”

On a slightly different note, VW says it will invest $10 million nationwide into charging infrastructure by the end of 2016 to increase EV adoption.

Read the full press release here

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14 Comments on "Volkswagen’s Holistic Approach To Low Carbon Mobility – Automaker Promises To Invest $10 Million Into U.S. Charging Infrastructure"

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Brian

I’m glad automakers are thinking about the entire lifecycle impact of their vehicles. I wish they would apply that same mindset to all vehicles, including large ICEVs.

Regarding the charging infrastructure, I hope that a good portion of that money goes to quick chargers. That is what we will need now and in the future.

scottf200

From link above it says “express charging” —
Volkswagen plans to invest $10 million in electric vehicle charging infrastructure by 2016
* ChargePoint selected to provide e-Golf owners access to more than 28,000 charging stations nationwide.
* Volkswagen, BMW and ChargePoint to create electric vehicle express charging corridors on the East and West coasts

Brian

But what is “express charging”? Is it 24kW DC? 50kW? We really need to be pushing into three digits here before it’s really “quick” charging. Even though in 2015 most EVs can only charge at up to ~50kW, the SAE standard allows nominally over 100kW. Any infrastructure should be installed supporting the near-future 200-mile BEVs, and not just the current ~80mile BEVs.

Tony Williams

The SAE-CCS standard is not “nominal” 100kW… that is the maximum:

500 volts * 200 amps = 100kW

They copied this limit directly from the existing CHAdeMO standard.

The nominal charge rate today is 125 amps maximum at a maximum battery voltage of 400 volts (the highest voltage publically available car is 96 cells in series * 4.2 volts =

Tony Williams

The SAE-CCS standard is not “nominal” 100kW… that is the maximum:

500 volts * 200 amps = 100kW

They copied this limit directly from the existing CHAdeMO standard.

The nominal charge rate today is 125 amps maximum at a maximum battery voltage of 400 volts (the highest voltage publically available car is 96 cells in series * 4.2 volts = 403.2 volts… Tesla Model S-85).

So, a typical charge is “nominally”:

125 amps * 350 volts = 43.75kW

The low powered chargers that BMW and VW are deploying are only about 63 amps, therefore the charge rate is cut in half to about 22kW.

For comparison, the Tesla Supercharger network can provide 340 amps continuous (Yes, almost THREE TIMES the power) so that:

340 amps * 350 volts = 119kW

Even at 200 amps with either CHAdeMO or SAE / Menekkes CCS Combo1/2, the nominal charge will be:

200 amps * 350 volts = 70kW

mustang_sallad

$10M lines up pretty well with the 100 DCFC stations we’ve heard about previously.

Djoni

Then they’re paying probably too much for each DCFC.
At that scale of investment, it’s probably 200 they might be able to build.

Ambulator

Forestry? Landfills? Silly Volkswagen, stick to cars!

finecadmin

No. BMW Group, Ford, and to a lesser extent “Daimler-Benz” are planning for a future in which single car ownership and operation is threatened, not assumed. We can add Volkswagen Group to the list, purchasing Ducati in time to invest in the Scrambler sub-brand, as well as other initiatives.

electric-car-insider.com

Nice to see VW step up with $10m for charging infrastructure. Reassuring that folks there recognize that customer satisfaction for EVs extends beyond the vehicle.

Kudos, VW

Lensman

$10 million? How does that compare to how much a medium to high volume auto maker typically spends on developing and tooling up for one single new model of automobile? Maybe in the ballpark of 1%? Or maybe even as little as 0.2%: “An all new vehicle on a new platform can easily cost 5-billion dollars.”

(source for that quote: http://www.engineering.com/AdvancedManufacturing/ArticleID/9764/GM-Spends-5-BillionBut-Not-For-Manufacturing.aspx )

Taken by itself, $10 million sounds like a lot. But compared to how much Volkswagen spends every year on building gasmobiles, it doesn’t even qualify as a drop in the bucket.

Brian

Conversely, how much does a high volume auto maker typically spend on fueling infrastructure for those “gasmobiles”?

If you’re going to compare investments, why not compare apples to apples? How much did VW already invest to tool up for building plug-ins?

Jelloslug

$10 million is a little more than what the die tooling costs to stamp out one metal body panel.

Mike I

$10 million is a little more than what VW spends on advertising in the USA in January and February of any recent year. (SWAG)