Video: Tesla Model S Signature Performance Hits the Track in GT6

DEC 21 2013 BY ERIC LOVEDAY 4

Model S Overtakes Corvette in GT6

Model S Overtakes Corvette in GT6

The Tesla Model S has finally hit the Gran Turismo 6 track and with it comes a new era in electric video gaming.

This video captures the Model S Signature Performance edition lapping the famed Twin Ring Motegi track in Japan.

Aside from some ridiculous levels of tire squealing, the Model S seems well represented in GT6.  It’s quick enough to easily pass some rather capable competitors and the interior details come close to matching the real-life version.

If you’re a video gamer and/or a Tesla Model S fan, then this clips for you.  Enjoy!!!

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4 Comments on "Video: Tesla Model S Signature Performance Hits the Track in GT6"

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scottf200

Clearly then need the P85+ and not the P85.

pjs

Does it slow down when the motor heats up like the real ones do? How about race length – about 20 minutes max before stopping for a 30 minute recharge, I imagine!

Michael

Model S was measured to use about 0.5 KWh of energy per 1/4 mile DRAG RACE. Which means that it can be grad raced for about 170 (!!!) runs before the battery runs out. That is – 45 miles of non-stop drag racing. What kind of gas can can claim to be able to do the same?

Now, notice that this is for DRAG RACING – the most stressful kind of racing on the drivetrain and energy efficiency. Under regular racing conditions you should expect the range to be over 100 miles at least. About the same (or more in some cases) as the range for comparable racing gas car.

Also, if you participate in some sort of exremely long race – Model S battery can be swapped out in 90 seconds (as was demonstrated – see YouTube). Note that a gas car would also need to be refueled for such a long race – in about the comparable kind of time.

Jesse Gurr

You forgot to include the fact that the number takes into account regen braking at the end. I think it actually took aabout 1.1 kWh for the 1/4 mile and made back 0.6 kWh from braking. I’m not sure how that translates to track use though because you would still brake but I doubt you would make that much back. Maybe unless you had some mighty powerful regen happening.