U.S. Plug-In Electric Car Market In 2015 – Pie Chart

MAY 18 2015 BY MARK KANE 18

2015 Monthly Sales Chart For The Major Plug-In Automakers - *Estimated Tesla NA Sales Numbers – Reconciled on Quarterly Totals, ** Fiat Does Not Report Sales Directly, Estimate Based on State/Rebate Data

2015 Monthly Sales Chart For The Major Plug-In Automakers – *Estimated Tesla NA Sales Numbers – Reconciled on Quarterly Totals, ** Fiat Does Not Report Sales Directly, Estimate Based on State/Rebate Data

Tesla Energy Powerwall

Tesla Model S & Tesla Energy Powerwall

Out of over 32,400 plug-in electric cars delivered in the US so far this year, Tesla Motors delivered the most  – 19.7%, almost one per five is a Tesla Model S.

Nissan LEAF sits right behind Tesla with some 17.4% market share, although market share is falling and sales year-over-year are too.

Believe it or not, but BMW i3 seems to be holding third place with 9.5%.

Then we have Chevrolet Volt at 8.6% and Fiat 500e, which closes out the Top 5 with 8.0%

U.S. Plug-In Car Market So Far In 2015 - Pie Chart

U.S. Plug-In Car Market So Far In 2015 – Pie Chart

Situation changes a little bit when we switch to brands.

As you can see, thesingle Tesla Model S selling enough to stay ahead of brands that have multiple models on the market like Ford or Chevrolet.

The top 3 – Tesla 19.7%, Nissan 17.4% and Ford 16.1% – are very close. BMW 11.0% sits just behind Chevrolet 12.5%.

Three quarters of all plug-ins sold this year comes from those five brands.

U.S. Plug-In Car Market So Far In 2015 - Pie Chart

U.S. Plug-In Car Market So Far In 2015 By Brand – Pie Chart

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18 Comments on "U.S. Plug-In Electric Car Market In 2015 – Pie Chart"

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kdawg
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Could also do a break-down by mfg. Not sure how much change that would be, but Cadillac & Chevrolet would fall under GM.

Jeff Songster
Guest
Jeff Songster

I agree… real manufacturers… as brands are phony, In future it would be better to see it as our corporate masters do. Volkswagen includes Porsche and Audi and all their other marques. Mercedes and Smart together… etc.

Josh
Guest

The funny thing is if you take WV (2.5%) + Porsche (1.5%) + Audi (0.0%), they still don’t move above the next OEM Toyota (5.2%).

Gbitten
Guest
Gbitten

I believe it would be more interesting to see the market share based on revenue instead on unit sales.

Josh
Guest

Revenue would be interesting, but kWh of batteries sold would be even more interesting.

Mikael
Guest
Mikael

Both by revenue and by kWh would be pretty meaningless.

Unless maybe if you’re investing in the companies but even then the share are so tiny it won’t make a difference. And if you’re just interested in Tesla then it’s easy enough to read the quarterly report.

Lensman
Guest
Lensman

Yeah, a breakdown by kWh would be quite interesting. That would separate the cars that really do replace a lot of gas-powered miles with electric-powered miles, from those cars which give little more than lip service to that.

I didn’t realize the two Ford Energi EVs fall into the latter category until I saw an InsideEVs article which compared plug-in EVs by kWh.

PaulG
Guest
PaulG

I wonder if its like the phone market, in that BMW and Tesla are eating up 60% of the profits between them?

speculawyer
Guest
speculawyer

I wonder if there are any profits.

Brian_Henderson
Guest

“Spec-u-lawyer” is that a statement from a lawyer, or question from a speculator?

Lensman
Guest
Lensman

The Volt’s share of the current pie is a lot smaller than it will be this fall, after the Volt 2.0 goes on sale. We can be sure there are a lot of potential Volt buyers putting off their purchase, so that percentage is artificially depressed from what it will be when the annual sales figures are available.

But as a Tesla enthusiast, I find it amusing to be able to honestly say that the Model S is the top selling plug-in EV in the U.S. and Canada this year! 🙂

Londo Bell
Guest
Londo Bell

It’s not necessary that Volt sales will actually increase – dramatically as some of you are saying – when the new model releases this coming Fall.

Its only market will only be in CA for several months, and with no green stickers, there is no “incentive” to wait and get one at that time.

In fact, it’s actually to get it now, so that buyer “may” still get the sticker.

Gardner
Guest
Gardner

The Volt would be popular if it had a bigger battery and super charging. GM has to bring the new Volt do to market and make continous improvements. GM has wrecked current Volt sales with press realeases well in advance of the new Volt’s availability. They aren’t helped by indifferent dealership employees’ lack of product knowledge.

Esa
Guest
Esa

Supercharging isn’t a thing outside Tesla, even though their patents are open. You’re talking about rapid charging (50+kW), Superchargers output over 130kW, no other car can even handle that (Renault Zoe might as it has a Chameleon charger).
Volt’s a PHEV, so it’s no wonder it can’t. It would be nice if Chevy did come out with a Volt EV, it’s a nice looking ride. Current one is still quite expensive though.

wavelet
Guest
wavelet

Volt EV? You mean like the Bolt 🙂

Esa
Guest
Esa

This is impressive in its own right, but if you input total ICE sales into the chart, it gets pretty depressing 😀 But cool progress nonetheless!
Too bad Renault isn’t selling Zoe in the US yet. I’d imagine it’d make a killing as it does in Europe. Getting one myself as Tesla’s aren’t getting any cheaper any time soon.

Mister G
Guest
Mister G

We just reached 400 ppm of CO2…this is not impressive.

wavelet
Guest
wavelet

Actually, the Zoe probably wouldn’t sell well… It is just too small for US tastes. An EV version of the Renault Koleos or Peugeot 5008 is what’s needed.

(Leaving aside the fact that low/mid-priced European vendors have been staying out of the US for many years, conditioning Americans to think of European cars as luxury cars.)