U.S Air Force Presents DoD’s First Electric Vehicle Fleet

DEC 7 2014 BY STAFF 15

United States Air Force Unveils Plug-In Electric Vehicle Fleet at Los Angeles Air Force Base

United States Air Force Unveils Plug-In Electric Vehicle Fleet at Los Angeles Air Force Base

Some BIG news from the Department of Defense:

“United States Air Force Unveils Plug-In Electric Vehicle Fleet at Los Angeles Air Force Base”

Actually, this is the large-scale plug-in vehicle fleet in any branch of the U.S. Military, but wait…there’s more:

“Princeton Power Systems Demonstrates EV Fast-Charger That Provides 100 Miles of Range in 20 Minutes With Additional Vehicle-to-Grid Capabilities”

So, these Air Force EVs are vehicle-to-grid capable too!

Here’s the full press blast on the DoD’s first large-scale plug-in vehicle fleet:

United States Air Force Unveils Plug-In Electric Vehicle Fleet at Los Angeles Air Force Base

PRINCETON, NJ – Princeton Power Systems, Inc., a leader in global design and manufacturing of technology products and embedded software for energy management, micro-grid operations, and electric vehicle charging, took part today in the unveiling of a unique Plug-In Electric Fleet on November 14th at 10:45am at The Gordon Conference Center at the Los Angeles Air Force Base in California (LAAFB).

Princeton Power Systems designed and delivered a fleet of bi-directional electric vehicle charging stations that can both rapidly charge the passenger vehicles and provide grid-support services back to the electric utility and grid operator. Princeton Power Systems was called upon to be a key contributor to the ground-breaking project due to the proven reliability and flexibility of its UL-listed GTIB product family, and the company’s track record of successful military and commercial Microgrid projects.

Princeton Power Systems delivered and commissioned thirteen CHAdeMO-compliant fast-charging stations based on the UL-Certified bi-directional multi-port converter; the GTIB-30. The new charging station products, named the CA-15 and CA-30, are capable of 15 kW and 30 kW charging rates respectively. Working directly with electric vehicle OEMs and third-party fleet-management software aggregators, Princeton Power played a vital role in developing the LAAFB solution, enabling the vehicles to compete in the electrical utility ancillary service markets and provide energy services to the Department of Defense (DOD) facilities. The ancillary service revenues will partially offset the EV fleet lease expense, while also providing the potential to improve energy security on base.

“The Department of Defense and Princeton Power Systems share the view that electric vehicle fleets can have long-term cost, logistics, fuel diversity, and environmental benefits,”said Darren Hammell, Chief Strategy Officer and Co-Founder, Princeton Power Systems. “In conjunction with the fast-charging, bi-directional CA-15 charging stations, the vehicles at the Los Angeles Air Force Base also can provide valuable services to the electric grid, further increasing the economic and environmental sustainability of this unique solution.”
A fleet of plug-in electric vehicles sits ready to roll at Los Angeles Air Force Base in El Segundo, California, on October 31, 2014. The new fleet is the first installation in the Department of Defense to replace its entire non-tactical fleet with electric and hybrid vehicles. U.S. Air Force photo by Sarah Corrice

A fleet of plug-in electric vehicles sits ready to roll at Los Angeles Air Force Base in El Segundo, California, on October 31, 2014. The new fleet is the first installation in the Department of Defense to replace its entire non-tactical fleet with electric and hybrid vehicles. U.S. Air Force photo by Sarah Corrice

“We absolutely couldn’t have done this without our federal, state and private partners,” said Miranda Ballentine, assistant secretary of the Air Force for installations, environment and energy. “The shared investment and commitment by our partners illustrates that innovations such as this have value not only to the Air Force and Department of Defense, but to the nation as a whole.”

During normal usage, the charging stations will rapidly charge the electric vehicles directly from the electric grid, enabling LAAFB personnel to utilize the electric vehicles as transportation within the base and the region. When called upon to support a vehicle-to-grid request, the electric vehicle’s on-board battery can be discharged rapidly directly into the grid. The rate of charging and discharging, and communication with the car and the grid, are all managed by the CA-15 charging station in a safe and reliable manner, meeting all local and national grid-interconnect codes. In addition to supporting the efficiency and reliability of the distribution system, the charging station and vehicle can provide demand response, VAR support, frequency regulation, and other operating modes.

About Princeton Power System
Based in New Jersey, Princeton Power Systems is a leading global designer and manufacturer of technology products and embedded software for energy management, micro-grid operations, and electric vehicle charging. Princeton Power Systems manufactures UL and CE certified power electronics for advanced battery operation and alternative energy, with built-in smart functions for grid services. Princeton Power Systems also integrates full systems including multiple generation sources, batteries, and other technologies, and designs, commissions, and operates micro-grids. Princeton Power Systems is proud to manufacture products in the USA that are in use across North America, Europe, Asia and the Caribbean with current projects soon expanding our presence to Africa. More information about Princeton Power is available at www.princetonpower.com.

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15 Comments on "U.S Air Force Presents DoD’s First Electric Vehicle Fleet"

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Anon

While this is a great first step away from oil dependance in the military, I’m saddened that the vehicles are not American made, nor is the fast charging standard used, the US version of CCS. 🙁

io

Nissan and Princeton Power Systems both manufacture in the US, which is likely a requirement to supply US government entities anyway (Buy American Act, etc).

Re standards, I’m glad to see the DoD using the best tool for the job (ie existing, available, supported, cost-effective) instead of limiting itself to “invented here”.

I rarely feel good about how the DoD spends my tax dollars, but this is one instance.
Good job guys.

Anon

I should have said “American owned EV Company”, but even there– there is only one “US” EV with DCFC, and that unfortunately, is the baby Leaf Clone: the GM Spark. And its chasis is outsourced from Asia. So you can’t really call it a fully native EV, either. 🙁

Considering the lack of viable EV choices, the DoD did fine. It’s just terribly sad to me that companies that had previously rose to meet military needs, like GM did with the Jeep, have not seen the same priority when an electruc drivetrain, is involved.

Perhaps someday Tesla could make a beefy AWD Military Jeep based off their Model Y platform… Till then, its Leafs for the Military. *blinks*

Couple years ago the armed forces were trying out a fuel cell car fleet from GM.

http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1073466_hydrogen-fuel-cell-cars-don-camouflage-join-army

Anon

We’re not discussing failed Hydrogen vehicle experiments… We were discussing BEVs in US military use.

io

Well, you were the one suggesting GM should offer electric drivetrains to the military; kdawg was pointing out this had been done already, just with a different energy storage system.

Did you know about this already? I didn’t, so I found his post relevant and interesting.

mhpr262

Generals should rate a Model S 😀

Mike

– Real Energy Independence
– Tax Payer Cost Savings.
– Flexible energy storage.
– Cleaner exhaust, cleaner air.

You the Real MVP.

GeorgeS

The military needs autonomys localized power distribution. So it is a great way to use the leaf and provide storage for the base which has solar panels.

Spec9

V2G really needs to become a thing. Between frequency regulation and sucking up overproduction on high renewable production days, it is a great thing for the grid. People’s fears of “Oh, I don’t want them using my battery” are overblown.

kubel

I agree, V2G is very promising, and there are no real technological barriers preventing it from being a success. But some sort of compensation has to be made by the utility to the owner of the battery, since the EV owner would be the one absorbing the cost associated with wear on the pack from the additional charge cycles.

Chris

I was going to say “MCAS Miramar and Camp Pendelton use Leafs for mail delivery” but it looks like the big news is that the AF is aggressively pushing for EVs at LAAFB…which works well considering how small the actual base is and how it doesn’t have any off road terrain

Mart

You will note the Air Force press release doesn’t call this the first electric vehicle fleet. They know better. There was a Th!nk City fleet at Vandenburg AFB. http://avt.inel.gov/pdf/uev/thinkcitydemoreport.pdf

Mart

Actually it’s Vandenberg, with an “e”, but the INEL report is rife with incorrect spelling.

AlanSqB

Great. Maybe the academy will get some of these so there could finally be some DCQC in Colorado Springs.