Toyota Licenses WiTricity Patent Portfolio for Wireless Power

DEC 6 2013 BY MARK KANE 6

If It Has a Plug....It's an EV... But can be an EV without plug also?

If It Has a Plug….It’s an EV… But Can It Be An EV Without a Plug?  Sure…If It Wireless Charges

Toyota Motor Corporation have signed an intellectual license agreement with WiTricity to use wireless charging in future rechargeable hybrid electric and battery electric vehicles.

“Toyota has identified this technology as a key differentiator in the marketplace because of its seamless operation and the convenience factor it offers the vehicle owners.”

Toyota Motor Corporation made an equity investment in WiTricity and began cooperation with WiTricity in 2011, so such a deal is rather natural.  Now we wait for the first Toyota capable of wireless charing.

Wireless charging is wireless, but still needs some device to provide the power. Such devices will be manufactured under a separate license.

“Compatible wireless charging sources will be manufactured by third party charging system suppliers, under license from WiTricity.”

WiTricity CEO Eric Giler stated:

“WiTricity’s mission is to make wireless charging available as widely as possible, and this announcement is a significant step toward accomplishing that mission. We envision a world in which wireless charging accelerates the adoption of clean, green electrified vehicles. To have Toyota, the world’s leading carmaker, licensing our intellectual property, underscores the importance of the technology.”

Categories: Charging, Toyota

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6 responses to "Toyota Licenses WiTricity Patent Portfolio for Wireless Power"
  1. Bloggin says:

    “Toyota Motor Corporation becomes the first automaker to have signed an intellectual license agreement with WiTricity to use wireless charging in future rechargeable hybrid electric and battery electric vehicles.”

    That’s no actually true. Toyota is just the latest of several companies who has signed an agreement. The article at Autonews.com goes on to state that…..

    “WiTricity also has licensed the technology to supplier Delphi, as well as to Audi and Mitsubishi.”

    Delphi is a major automotive supplier for Ford and GM, and according to Delphi’s website….”Delphi was honored by Ford Motor Company with two “Recognitions of Achievement” as part of the “World Excellence Award” program at the recent Ford Supplier Conference in Dearborn, Mich.”

    1. Mark Kane says:

      I know. I believe this is something more then previous deals. But I changed.

  2. Would love to see an article regarding the dangers to pets. But its funny since Ann Colter said Radiation (Nuclear in her case) is good for you, nothing is bad for us any more.

    1. Priusmaniac says:

      Either the car is above the charging plate which leaves little room for pets, either it is not there and there is no energy flow.
      In the last case no worry and in the second case, unless you pet is made of metal, it should be ok. Avoid a metallic necklace on your cat as an extra precaution although if he happens to be there in the wrong place at the wrong time, the heating up will make him move away quiet fast.

      1. Well, as a seasoned operator of amateur radio (and commercial licensee ), I’m perhaps more aware of harmful radiation or electric fields, since I’ve experienced sensitivity to them myself.

        As to the other point, I thought there was plenty of room for a cat to go to sleep on the pad.

        I’m not sure anyone is qualified to say these things are safe. On the contrary, there has been plenty of work showing fields of this extreme power density are questionable, especially with the pet exactly in the middle of the field. I know, the tranmitting frequency will be 87 khz. At 144mhz with much a much less power density, you can cook hot dogs.

        I hope you don’t put your kitten in the microwave to dry it out, as some pet owners have done.

        1. “….Daimler’s Head of Future Mobility, Professor Herbert Kohler, however have expressed caution and said the inductive charging for EVs is at least 15 years away and the safety aspects of inductive charging for EVs have yet to be looked into in greater detail. For example, what would happen if someone with a pacemaker is inside the vehicle?……”