Thailand Announces Grand Plans To Get Electric Cars On Its Roads

NOV 12 2016 BY ERIC LOVEDAY 7

Bangkok Post reports that Thailand had only 52 battery electric vehicles registered nationwide as of September 30, 2016.

Nissan LEAF Thailand

Nissan LEAF Thailand

That’s a tiny figure, that hopefully will rise soon as the government begins to implement several plans to push adoption of electric cars upwards.

The goal for Thailand is to get 1.2 million electric vehicles on its roads within the next two decades. To reach that goal, the government will implement the following measures:

Charging stations to be installed starting later this year

Introduction of 20 public electric buses next month and 200 by the end of next year

5,000 imported EVs per years will receive full tax exemption, says the Kasikorn Research Centre (via the Bangkok Post):

“…the tax exemption will make the BEV price (not include marketing cost) 15-85% higher than fuel cars; without the measure they would be 65-260% more expensive.”

That’s just phase one of the program. Beyond that, three more phases will be implemented with various measures such as incentives, funds for battery research and local development of electric cars and so on.

It’s really an all-encompasing program and so far some six (undisclosed) automakers have signed on to assist in getting Thailand closer to its 1.2-million goal.

Source: Bangkok Post

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7 Comments on "Thailand Announces Grand Plans To Get Electric Cars On Its Roads"

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Bangkok could really use fewer ICE vehicles spewing fumes, BEVs wouldn’t need a ton of range to work for a lot of Thai commuters.
And solar arrays on homes and businesses would see a lot of sun…
Build them both in Thailand, the quality of the work force is very high, I would rather buy cameras built in Thailand rather than China because the build quality tends to be much better.

Thailand the land of smiles, and the sun!
It really needs to focus on solar power and electric vehicles. There is enormous potential.
Seeing how popular electric scooters are in China its strange there are hardly any at all in Thailand.

InsideEVs,

You make it sound like the Thai government is giving EVs and cash away with statement:
“5,000 imported EVs per years wil receive full tax exemption, reducing their price by up to 200%.”.
Where can sign up to get a Model 3 … discounted 200%? 😉

The Bangkok Post article states the insentibe slightly differently.
“A quota of 5,000 imported EVs will receive a tax exemption, which will likely help keep the price down. Kasikorn Research Centre estimates that the tax exemption will make the BEV price (not include marketing cost) 15-85% higher than fuel cars”.

Think what you mean is current import taxes could more than double the cost of an EV purchase. ie: it’s the “tax” on an EV, not the “price” that’s being reduced.

The question is, do you get 2 free EVs for the price of one free or do you get the same amount the cars cost in cash with your free EV? 😛

200% reduction… I’m impressed!

I recall Bangkok as one of the most polluted cities I’d ever been in, back in 1986 — the prevalence of 2-stroke 2-wheelers & 3-wheelers was pretty bad.
I hope they’re going to do this in time. Certainly all the various tourist destination islands (Koh Samui et. al.) would be ideal for BEVs — travel distances are really short.

That I-MiEV has LED-Headlamps! It´s a shame Mitsu is not improving the battery pack. With Samsung or LG cells this car would go 150+ miles.

Interesting for me as an EV fan and I just got back to the UK from Bangkok but missed this email which ended up in my junk folder.

I can report very little sign of smog (I gather 2 stroke engines were banned some years ago). Also very little litter. Generally pretty clean but faintly shambolic.

Few bicycles but many scooters/motorcycles/truk-truks.

Taxis abound but not much evidence of a bus network.

Taxis need some *serious* attention from regulators as only about half the ones I took would use their meter – otherwise it was haggle before getting in and then none of them had a clue where they were going.

The electricity grid appears ropey – very high water table so I gather most of the cables are above ground – and much evidence of this and all looking as though it needs re-organizing/replacing! Not a good start for EV up-take. Almost all their electricity is generated from natural gas (Wiki). The load from (really annoyingly cold) air conditioning *everywhere* must make up half the energy use!