Tesla’s Gigafactory To Be Even Bigger Than Expected? (w/video)


Tesla Gigafactory Scale Model

Tesla Gigafactory Scale Model


Tesla Motors’s Gigafactory could be much larger than originally planed 35 GWh (cell production capacity) and 50 GWh (total pack production capacity).

News comes in the form of a presentation about the Tahoe Reno Industrial Center, by Dean Haymore, from Story County Commission (see video below).

Tesla recently purchased an additional 1,200 acres of land adjacent to the Gigafactory that’s under construction near Reno, Nevada. That more than doubles Tesla’s land and Tesla intends to purchase another 350 acres.

If Tesla expands the Gigafactory then maybe it could be a 100+ GWh factory one day.

Via Electrek (Fred Lambert):

“Tesla originally planned for a 10 million square-foot modular factory with the first phase, the pilot plant (see picture above), representing about a quarter of the total building. But during Haymore’s recent presentation, the Story County official said that Tesla is now planning to have 7 “blocks” like the one currently under-construction and if all 7 are completed, the total square footage would be 24 million square-foot instead of the 10 million originally planned. If this turns out to be true, The Gigafactory would be the largest building by footprint on the planet.

It is not clear how this change would affect the production output of the factory. Tesla planned for a total battery cell output of 35 GWh and battery pack output of 50 GWh or enough for 500,000 vehicles, the difference in battery cells would be imported to the factory for Tesla to assemble the battery packs, presumably from Panasonic.

During a recent conference call discussing Tesla’s financial results, Elon Musk, Tesla’s CEO, said the company was looking into possibly increasing their planned battery production capacity after the impressive demand the company experienced when they unveiled their stationary energy storage products. At the time, the CEO mentioned the possibility of adding capacity to the plant currently under-construction near Reno.”

Panasonic also is preparing to jump into Gigafactory together with 14 suppliers:

“Panasonic is bringing 14 other companies, beside them, over here (Tahoe Reno Industrial Center) to provide for Tesla.”

source: Electrek


Category: Tesla


37 responses to "Tesla’s Gigafactory To Be Even Bigger Than Expected? (w/video)"
  1. RS says:

    If 50GWh is enough for 500,000 cars the average car will have 100kwh! As most of those cars will be 3s, with less battery capacity, I start to wonder how much kWh the S might get? 150? That could be almost 500 miles!

    1. Mikael says:

      The plan with the Gigafactory was to sell battery packs to other manufacturers too. And now that plan has probably been replaced with some of the capacity diverted to stationary storage.
      The whole 50 GWh was never supposed to go to the 500k cars they have been talking about.

      When they are at 500k sales the Model 3/Y will probably average 70-75 kWh and the Model S/X average around 100 kWh or maybe slightly more.
      At 100k S/X and 400k 3/Y that would be around 38 GWh, 76 kWh on average.

      1. Lou Grinzo says:

        I’m guessing that one of the “surprises” will be how many battery packs Tesla sells to other car companies per year by 2020. If they’re the low-cost producer, as everyone expects, then the latecomers (Honda, Toyota, and Fiat/Chrysler, most notably) will have to buy from Tesla or be at a distinct disadvantage.

        I’m not sure where Nissan falls in all this, but pack cost could be a painful issue for them, as well in a few years.

        1. Lensman says:

          Other EV manufacturers will only buy battery packs from Tesla so long as they only want to make them in compliance car numbers, as Toyota did with the RAV4 EV. Once legacy auto makers finally and grudgingly move to make models of PEVs intended to sell in large numbers, they won’t supply them with battery packs bought from a rival manufacturer for the same reasons that no gasmobile maker buys a gas engine from a rival company, for any model they intend to make in large numbers.

          There are two reasons:

          1. No company would willingly limit its production of a core product to a number limited by how many a rival company is willing to supply them.

          2. No company would willingly give a rival that much income.

    2. Lensman says:

      The original plan was that 35 GWh would go to supplying EVs, and the other 15 out of the Gigafactory’s 50 GWh annual output would to go stationary power storage, such as the Tesla Powerpack and Powerwall.

      Obviously those numbers might change depending on how the markets develop.

  2. pjwood1 says:

    I would want to be sure the acreage isn’t merely going to be used for ground-mount solar.

    I haven’t read the details, but Austin Energy’s $.04 / kwh bid receipt, ~2 weeks ago, for solar power, could be mean modelers of utility scale PV-battery have returned to their calculators. That could also influence Tesla’s plans.

    1. Scramjett says:

      I thought most of the solar was to be rooftop mounted? In any case, I suspect the extra land grab is to make room for future expansion.

      1. Lensman says:

        Yes, the solar panels will be rooftop. But there is to be a nearby wind farm, which likely will need quite a bit of room.

    2. Steven says:

      Merely? Properly designed, an employee parking lot can co-locate with heliostats quite nicely. I’d imagine the employees wouldn’t mind parking in the “shade” also.

  3. Fred Lambert says:

    If you are to quote half my article, which is about twice the lenght of yours, the least you could do is put my name and the link in the body of the article instead of a link at the bottom.

    1. Aaron says:

      Or you can stop whining and realize they even bothered to give you a link.

      1. Jay Cole says:

        Hey Aaron, its no problem. We’ll put your name in Fred and an additional link, (=

      2. Fred Lambert says:

        It’s not whining, I’m formerly complaining in order for them to properly quote my work,

        Which seem to have worked, so thank you Jay.

        1. Scramjett says:

          I think Aaron’s grievance is warranted. Your “formal complaint” sounded more snarky and insulting than a mere “formal” complaint. A simple “Can you please place my name and the link to my article in the body instead of the bottom? Thanks!” would have been more formal and appropriate. Or, if you want a proper complaint: “I don’t appreciate quoting a large section of my article without including my name and link in the body. Will you please correct this? Thanks!”

          1. Fred Lambert says:

            I get your point, but still I felt compel to mention that his whole article is 2 paragraph + quoting half my article. I don’t care how it makes me look.

            I get rewrites. it’s not great, but once the information is out there – it’s out there. At least they put some work into rewriting, maybe put some color of their own, but this it felt cheap. Write 50 words then copy and paste another person’s article…

            1. Lensman says:

              You have a legitimate complaint. But if you’re going to post about business, it certainly helps to do it in a business-like manner.

        2. Independent Observer says:

          Fred, you need to relax. This is internet blogs. Social media has no rules. The old days are long gone. As Bob Dylan said the times are a changin’

          1. Anonymous says:

            Fred needs a box of chocolates and a Man-pon.

            I agree with Scramjett.

          2. Lensman says:

            Independent Observer said:

            “Social media has no rules.”

            There speaks someone who has never read any website’s TOS (Terms Of Service).


  4. Lensman says:

    It certainly makes sense for Tesla to buy land at the site now, rather than wait until later when property values skyrocket. I’m pretty sure Disney did the same at the area around Disney World; I understand they own a lot of land that hasn’t been developed yet, giving them a lot of potential for future expansion. That doesn’t necessarily mean Tesla has any real plans for building an even larger Gigafactory; it’s a prudent investment to insure future room for growth.

    But skimming thru the original article, it looks like the author is only considering the footprint of the factory building itself. There will be a need for a large parking lot, and the nearby planned wind farm may need even more acreage than the factory itself. Those two things are going to eat up a lot of that additional land, even without any future expansion.

  5. Doug (dhanson865) says:

    @Fred Lambert and @Jay Cole

    There are actually 3 videos for that meeting on youtube. You are missing the 2nd and 3rd part of the meeting.

    If you want to see them in order watch the 30 minute one first, the 5 minute one second, and the 16 minute one third.

    1. Doug (dhanson865) says:

      http://www.teslamotorsclub.com/showthread.php/27926-Tesla-Gigafactory?p=1062384&viewfull=1#post1062384 and the posts following post #504 discuss this video and more and are worth checking out including the visualization of the floor heights in post #526

      1. Jay Cole says:

        Thanks for the vids and the link to the discussion Doug, appreciate that!

  6. CherylG's_DirtyLittleSecret says:

    @Fred Lambert

    Well, now I don’t even want to bother going to your link…….jerk.

    1. Fred Lambert says:

      well great. A guy writes 50 words then copy and paste half my article and I’m the jerk for calling him out? Right on.

      1. LusTuCCC says:

        Every web site I visit quotes parts of others articles. Wtf?!?

        1. Lensman says:

          Quoting half of someone else’s article and just putting a few sentences of your own text around it, as a sort of frame, is certainly not common practice, to say the least. If I were Fred, I’d be upset too.

          The proper procedure would be to ask permission to reprint the entire article, under the original author’s byline. That is common practice at other websites.

          The fact that Fred is expressing himself poorly doesn’t prevent him from being in the right.

    2. sven says:

      Too bad for you. Fred’s blog has some very good/interesting content and is very well done. I bookmarked it. Thanks for the original story Fred!

      1. Fred Lambert says:

        Thank you for the kind words. Look out for a major redesign of the website this weekend.

        1. sven says:

          Keep up the good work!

  7. Mikael says:

    There are plenty of good reasons to have a lot of land around such a big factory with possible 5-10k workers.

    Anything from windmills/solar PV to future expansions to being able to build residential areas/daycare centers/parks/hotels/shopping malls or whatever might be wanted or needed to have close to the factory once it’s up and running at full speed.

    It makes no sense in not buying it and not being able to have it once it’s needed in the future, land is pretty cheap and available there now.

    1. CherylG's_DirtyLittleSecret says:

      It’s additional room for Restaurants and Casinos.

      1. ModernMarvelFan says:

        Yes, people who works there need services nearby…

        Shopping centers, hospitals, schools… Or may be couple “bunny ranches”… LOL

    2. ffbj says:

      How about a test track with large numbers of sc nearby? Or just using the land as a buffer zone. It will probably have multiple uses planned for it.
      Also thanks to Fred Lambert for the original story.

  8. Someone out there says:

    Spending money is always fun but I hope they have the cash flow to handle all of this.

    By the way, can’t they just add another floor or two to the Gigafactory if they want to expand it?

    1. ffbj says:

      I think the guy in the video mentions that they did do that, add another floor.

    2. Lensman says:

      “Someone out there” asked:

      “By the way, can’t they just add another floor or two to the Gigafactory if they want to expand it?”

      Not unless the building’s foundation was designed to support more than the two floors that are being built.