Teslanomics Details Cost Of Charging EV From Rooftop Solar – Video

Tesla Solar Roof


Teslanomics encourages us that it’s possible to charge Tesla for roughly $25 a month using solar.


Coming in 2018 Tesla Solar Roof (details)In Tuscan Tiling

In total, host Ben Sullins has installed 16 panels, good for a PV system rated at 5.12 kW (with a Powerwall coming soon).

As a result, Ben states he has lowered his monthly bill from $190 to just $10, resulting in $180 monthly savings. The total cost of the system, spread over 25 years will be $47 a month, so like a virtual no-brainer.

Adding in utility fees, the bottom line cost of the system works out to be $57 a month, of which his Tesla usually draws 45% of his monthly energy bill, which is less than $26 of the system fees.

Naturally if someone drives more, the energy cost would be higher, but then there is also more rudimentary savings compared to gas.

What is the Cost of Charging a Tesla with Solar? (source: Teslanomics by Ben Sullins)

What is the Cost of Charging a Tesla with Solar? (source: Teslanomics by Ben Sullins)

Category: Videos


21 responses to "Teslanomics Details Cost Of Charging EV From Rooftop Solar – Video"
  1. El Fantastico says:

    Excellent video… and enough to make Big Oil wet its pants! “Stoptesla.com” LOL

  2. William says:

    I hope this great video can get the Tesla Powerwall cost into the financial equation as soon as it gets installed. The real costs for many charging daily drivers, would need to add the solar battery Wall storage for night time charging. Net metering is not available in many places. Big Oil is going to have to diversify their energy portfolio if they want to get a foothold on this emerging transportation energy sector.

    1. WARREN says:

      I was at Costco last night talking to a Sun Run representative. He said if you don’t have a system installed by July 1st here in SoCal, SCE is changing their net metering policy of how they offset your nightime energy fees vs what you generate in the daytime. Anyone else hear of this?

      1. Stimpacker says:

        Yes, new NEM policy will force solar houses to TOU rates. Evening usage after solar is out will be at peak rates.

        1. BenG says:

          This change will make the Tesla Powerwall products much more economically feasible.

          Late night rates should still be affordable but this will at minimum discourage people from charging their cars during the late evening and early night peak.

        2. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ sven says:

          That sucks. In my area, peak period for TOU runs from 8am all the way to midnight, which REALLY sucks.

          1. Mark.ca says:

            You may want to double check on that time frame…
            In my area SCE has 2 TOU rates and the one recommended for solar has a peak from 12PM to 6PM…not bad at all since most are at work during that time interval anyway. They will demand that any installs starting July be on TOU.

          2. Bill Howland says:

            The easy solution for you, SVEN, is to not subscribe to Time-of-Use Rates.

            Powerwalls are illegal with net-metering in NY State anyway. It is one or the other.

  3. WARREN says:

    And the price of electricity is only going to go up. I had 12 anodized black mono-crystalline panels delivered this week. Already have my Enphase microinverters, cabling, and Envoy. Ordering the IronRidge black racks this week. I have no problem installing the racks and panels myself. Just trying to find an electrician solar specialist to help out with plans for all the red-tape permitting, etc here in So Cal. Its difficult though since most solar companies want to do the whole package themselves to make maximum profit. Either way, will be exciting to watch the solar system output on the Enphase phone App.

    1. JoeP says:

      I did my permit drawing myself, but don’t recommend doing that unless you can find a sample set of drawings and have the right software. I had almost the right software and it was a royal pain.

      1. Get Real says:

        When I retired from the Army and moved home 5 years ago the first thing I did to my house was to self install a 4kw system to say a big FU to the Jihadis and the oil companies (I have since added 2 more kw of panels).

        Equipment was less then 10k (quote from solar installation companies were in the 30K rip-off range!) and since I bought through WholesaleSolar.com they include the required electrical line diagram for permitting.

        The rest of the permit was easy, mainly the cut sheets of the equipment and a roof diagram showing the mounting layout.

        Took me about 40 hours of my labor and I did get a friend to help me get the panels onto the roof (2 story) and an electrician friend to make the electrical panel connection.

        Best money that I ever spent and now that my family drives all PEVs I have already passed breakeven ant the next 25 years plus of production is pure gravy!

        A PV system (especially with PEVs) is absolutely one of the best financial investments you can make considering the money saved over the life of the investment.

        I have since helped 7 of my friends install their own systems and the prices have gone WAY down on the equipment

        Big Oil companies and the politicians and political party they have bought plus the shills they have absolutely hate it for sure since it means their loss of power but its literally a win-win for everybody else.

        1. AlphaEdge says:

          Great to hear that! Preach on brother, and continue to inspire others to do this!

          America’s huge monstrous trade deficit is largely driven by the huge sums of money America pays for oil.

    2. Stimpacker says:

      Check out this site:

      Chapter 4 documents the permitting process and engineering calculations.

      Chapter 6.11 is a full example of permit paperwork. Passed inspection first round.

  4. DJ says:

    Naybe it’s just me but I think “stories” like this are just horrible. The cost depends HUGELY on the amount you drive.

    It’s a much better, and frankly simpler approach to say something like power from an average PV system costs roughly 9 cents a kWh and you get 3 miles out of that so it’s really 3 cents per mile. Then BAM if you drive 5,000 miles a month it’ll cost you $1,500, 200 miles a month, it costs you $6.

    Trying to normalize everything in the end makes it simpler but also more wrong

    1. David Cary says:

      If you are going to normalize, make sure you check your math. At 5,000 miles a month (top .1%), electricity would cost you $150.
      Mind you the gas saved might be $600 a month – so the $150 doesn’t look too bad.

      The top drivers by mileage can pay for a Tesla and save money. But the resale might be a problem (or the longevity)

  5. Mark.ca says:

    My story and numbers are very close to his…
    My system $20150 for 5440kw installed (paid with credit card so got $200 back as points so total cost $19950)
    Tax credit $6045
    Total 13905
    Old gas costs $110/m (@$3/gal)
    Cost in electricity from grid $30/m (eGolf)….form panels is free since i get surplus energy anyway.

  6. darth says:

    That price is a bit high. Group buy prices here in Northern VA are running $2.50/watt before any tax credit. That is 6Kw for $15,000. That is using the absolute cheapest panels, so its the basement price.

    1. Mark.ca says:

      That price is for 320w panels…i guess he has the same panels i have the LG320 which are not cheap but you get more quality and less of them on the roof. What is this “Group buy prices” you are referring to?

  7. AlphaEdge says:

    There is an elephant in the room.

    If he going to factor the cost of the solar installation, then he also has to factor in the premium he paid for the Tesla, and it’s much more than the savings he is getting over 25 years.

    This math works much better with a Leaf, Bolt, or upcoming M3.

  8. Unplugged says:

    Since Elon Musk calls his company “Tesla” and not “Tezla,” perhaps the video commentator can change his pronunciation?

    (I cringe each time he says it.)

  9. PHEVvsBEV says:

    It’s a nice toy for the home, like a pool, but to rationalization it as a decent investment is nuts. The investment doesn’t really pay back unless the owner stays in the house for 25 years? I read somewhere that the US average home ownership length is 5.9 years. Plus throw in the cost of money and payback is even further out.