Tesla Supercharger Nominated for AOL’s 2013 Automotive Technology of the Year Award

DEC 1 2013 BY ERIC LOVEDAY 3

Tesla Supercharger Among List of Nominees for AOL's 2013 Automotive Technology of the Year Award

Tesla Supercharger Among List of Nominees for AOL’s 2013 Automotive Technology of the Year Award

“Tesla fans, please VOTE to help Tesla’s ‪#‎Supercharger‬ win the AOL Autos Technology of the Year award!”

Is Tesla's Supercharger Worthy of the Award?

Is Tesla’s Supercharger Worthy of the Award?

Says Tesla Motors via its Facebook page.

At first, there were 40 nominees for the AOL Autos Technology of the Year award in the areas of Connectivity, Active Safety, Telematics and Fuel Economy.  Now, the list consists of only 6 finalists.

AOL is “inviting you to take a seat at the judges’ table.”  By this, AOL means that you’re allowed to vote.  According to AOL Autos:

“The result of this vote is equal to that of one judge, with the overall winner being announced at the Consumer Electronics Show in January 2014.”

“You may vote once every 24 hours. There can only be one winner – the challenge is on!”

To vote, click here.

We’d mention the other 5 nominees if they had something to do with plug-in vehicles, but since none of them do, they get excluded by us.

Here are some of the reasons why AOL Autos thinks the Tesla Supercharger is worthy of being a finalist:

“…true luxury means freedom. Freedom to go anywhere at anytime. To allay the fear of limited range (often called “range anxiety”) Tesla has begun building a no-cost network of fast-charging stations using at distances across the U.S. meant to make a cross-country drive feasible.”

“The fast-charging stations work as advertised, and represent a bold effort by the upstart company to not only build world-class cars, but the infrastructure to support them. For this reason, the Tesla Supercharger was voted a finalist for Technology of the Year.”

“Each station Tesla is building will have up to twelve stalls while some will have solar panels to help generate electricity. Charging for Tesla owners is free.”

Source: AOL Autos

Categories: Charging, Tesla

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3 Comments on "Tesla Supercharger Nominated for AOL’s 2013 Automotive Technology of the Year Award"

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Mint

Rather odd, given that supercharging is probably the technologically least impressive thing Tesla has done.

It’s everything about the Model S that made Tesla’s supercharging infrastructure possible. It being such a great car is what propelled TSLA to heights that allowed it to raise the capital needed, and being amazingly competitive and successful in the large luxury car segment is what justified the deployment of the infrastructure.

Foo

The gas pump was never very technologically impressive either, but look what it did for private transportation. It was a key part of a revolution.

Bill Howland
Well, if the batteries could be made big enough, the need for these stations would greatly decrease. Its uncanny that the after midnight “Extremely Grid Friendly” charging done on most EV’s turns out to a really GRID HATING system with these superchargers. I think the Solar Panels are mostly for Looks since even these stations still require a HUGE green pad transformer (I thought that Supercharger stations only needed 500kw from the grid, but some of the recent installations proved me wrong there, since some of the stations have at least 750 kva green pad transformers feeding them). I don’t have figures, but I’d assume these supercharging stations are busiest coincident with the largest Grid Demand for the day, either the afternoon, or early evening. So its funny there is all this clamoring for “V2G grid friendly Hookups”, while the Tesla Supercharger is a HUGE additional load at the wrong time. Grid hating??? !!! I admit with the relatively short range of current cars, they get customers out of a bind. But at least, the utility charges demands commensurate with the station’s impact, and customers pay for it for the $2000 per car option on the 60kwh Model S. Musk… Read more »