Tesla Tries To Answer Which Car Is Right For You? – Model S Or Model 3

Tesla Model 3

APR 7 2017 BY STEVEN LOVEDAY 32

Tesla Model S refresh

Tesla Model S

Tesla admits that it is aware that customers will have many questions, as the upcoming Model 3 becomes available. The question has been asked:

“Should I trade in my Model S for a Model 3?”

As Elon Musk has pointed out recently, the Model 3 is not meant to be Tesla’s “Version 3.” Whereas the Model X is essentially a Model S, which satisfies a different segment (SUV), the Model 3 is not the “next generation Tesla.”

Tesla Model 3

Model 3

Tesla wants its customers to keep in mind that the automaker’s current vehicles are, and will continue to be, its very best vehicles; and probably for everyone thinking about a Model 3 buy, to also consider its more premium product – they have available today.

The Model S will remain as the company’s flagship vehicle. It provides the best driving experience, and along with the Model X, it includes the most advanced technology the company has to offer…at a higher price of course.

In a blog post on Tesla’s website, the automaker explains:

Model S is the leader in its class in every category, which is why 94 percent of our owners say they will buy Model S again.

It has a 5-star safety rating and will continue to be our flagship Model with more range, more acceleration, more power, more passenger and cargo room, more displays (two) and more customization choices.

With Ludicrous+, Model S has a zero-to-60 time of 2.28 seconds as measured by Motor Trend, making it the fastest accelerating production car in the world. Model S will also continue to be the longest-range vehicle we offer, capable of a landmark 335 miles on a single charge, meaning you can travel from Los Angeles to San Francisco nonstop.

The Model 3 is not just smaller, it is simplified, and offers much less in terms of options and features. However, Tesla says it will still provide an exemplary driving experience, and outstanding range (“at least 215 miles for our starting model”). The latter part is interesting, since everything lately has led us to figure that the Model 3 will arrive with more range than that of the Chevrolet Bolt.

Tesla concludes with a reminder that safety is the automaker’s number one priority. The Model 3 will come standard with the same full self-driving hardware, and over-the-air software updates found in the Model S and X. Also, drivers can expect an acceleration in updates this year, and the vehicles (including the Model 3) aim to be much safer than human drivers.

Full text of the Tesla blog post below:

Model S or Model 3

We’ve been getting ready for Model 3 by advancing manufacturing, expanding our charging network, improving service, opening more retail stores and much more.

Tesla would probably prefer customers to just go ahead and order a Model S today

With a new model coming this year, we know our customers will have questions about which car is right for them. One question we’ve been asked is, “Should I trade in my Model S for a Model 3?” While Model 3 will be our newest car, it isn’t “Version 3” or the next generation Tesla. Our higher priced premium models still include the most advanced technology and the best driving experience we have to offer.

Model S is the leader in its class in every category, which is why 94 percent of our owners say they will buy Model S again. It has a 5-star safety rating and will continue to be our flagship Model with more range, more acceleration, more power, more passenger and cargo room, more displays (two) and more customization choices. With Ludicrous+, Model S has a zero-to-60 time of 2.28 seconds as measured by Motor Trend, making it the fastest accelerating production car in the world. Model S will also continue to be the longest-range vehicle we offer, capable of a landmark 335 miles on a single charge, meaning you can travel from Los Angeles to San Francisco nonstop.

Model 3 is smaller, simpler, and will come with far fewer options than Model S, but it makes driving feel effortless and offers a good range of at least 215 miles for our starting model.

At the foundation of every Tesla is safety – keeping our customers safe is part of every decision we make. In addition, every Tesla vehicle (Model 3 too) comes standard with full self-driving hardware which, through over-the-air software upgrades, will enable a Tesla to be substantially safer than a human driver. As we continue to test and validate new features, customers can expect an increasing number of updates to be rolled out to their cars this year. And while innovation at Tesla will never stop, the very best vehicles we make are already available for purchase and on the road today.

Source: Tesla

Categories: Tesla

Tags: ,

Leave a Reply

32 Comments on "Tesla Tries To Answer Which Car Is Right For You? – Model S Or Model 3"

avatar
newest oldest most voted
jim stack
Guest
jim stack

So where is the advise on how to decide? For most of us it comes down to the price! The 3 is half the price with about the same features and close to the same room. 20% smaller is more efficient and we get US made batteries in the 3.

Brian Anderson
Guest
Brian Anderson

Jim, agree with all your points. The statement, “it (Model 3) isn’t… the next generation Tesla”, is also pure marketing spin. If Model 3 isn’t the next generation, then what generation is it? Tesla has work to do to make the extra cost of Model S worth it.

Brian
Guest
Brian

The point is that the Model 3 will not leapfrog the Model S. If there are really brand new features introduced this summer (e.g. Autopilot improvements), look for them on the new Model S’s as well.

Nix
Guest
Nix

That’s the same reasoning that points towards Tesla putting the 2170 cells in the Model S and X by sometime this fall/winter.

Gibber
Guest
Gibber

IMHO the 3 is the best looking Tesla to date, until I get to the sliced off nose section, it looks like they kept working on different looks and finally said “F” it and cut it off. (this was supposed to be my vote for the 3)

William
Guest
William

Model Y is the Best for replacing my Nissan Leaf. Model 3 is runner up without a doubt, until Model Y availability in 2018-2020.

Anon
Guest
Anon

I’m holding out for their crossover, too.

Four Electrics
Guest
Four Electrics

I find this post rather ridiculous and condescending. Tesla just needs to accept that some who would have purchased an S do not prefer to throw their money away for no reason, and in fact will make do with the cheaper 3. I expect Tesla to get even more creative with ways to recover lost Model S revenue in the short term.

Clayton
Guest
Clayton

And that some people prefer a smaller car. While straight line performance of the faster S models is amazing, I would prefer a 3 for spirited driving if it is able to shed 500-1000 lbs.

I also just don’t need a huge car.

JohnMB
Guest
JohnMB

Yes, I too just don’t need a huge car with a huge battery so the “Model” i3 was my choice..actually two of them..the second CPO at $24,000 for a Tera World WOW is right…If Big Brother decides to drop the incentive then I’m sitting pretty.

Four Electrics
Guest
Four Electrics

And yes, sometimes it does make sense to trade in an S for a 3: if you have an S manufactured last year, and don’t need a super sized beast of a car, you might be able to upgrade to full self driving capability for no additional cash. Not a bad deal.

Juice13
Guest
Juice13

I think the option price for the self driving on the Model 3 is going to be a big jump, much higher than the Model S. I even expect “packages” of options to force you into lots of features that you might otherwise not want just to get self driving. Or maybe levels of features like auto cruise, then add a limited safety suite, then self parking and summon, then highway super cruise, then full autonomous.
Tesla has to somehow make up the money lost on giving my Model 3 all the hardware for self driving that I won’t pay for.

Clayton
Guest
Clayton

I’m leaning the opposite direction. I would not be surprised if full autonomy ends up being free, much cheaper, or free if you sign up for Tesla mobility.

Free scenario: Tesla just wants to totally shut out the competition

Much cheaper scenario: Being software, it scales very well. They also want to push Tesla insurance concept. The more people using safer auto-pilot, the more reason for people to use Tesla’s insurance.

Tesla Mobility scenario: Maybe instead of buying autopilot license, you get a discount or free if you agree to let Tesla use your car as a taxi while you aren’t using it. Maybe your car “works off” the autopilot license before you start receiving revenue share.

Bojan
Guest
Bojan

I think Autopilot can only become cheaper gradually, any sudden price drops would be a slap in the face to all the customers who paid the full price before the drop.

I think it is much more likely that the autopilot features will keep their high cost, but those costs will be offset by cheaper insurance and/or revenue from car sharing, similar to how electric cars cost more than fossil cars, but are cheaper to fuel.

notting
Guest
notting

The Model S is too long and too wide. And no Tesla has a battery guaranty with minimum capacity (e.g. in %).
I also completely dislike the permanent internet connection which is used be Tesaa to monitor my car permanentely resp. that I can’t avoid firmware updates by other drivers of my car resp. can’t downgrade in case of problems.

Also Tesla still has no garage in a range of 100km from here. And Ranger service is very expensive.

notting

EV4Life
Guest
EV4Life

Sounds like you’re not ever going to be a Tesla customer so the post obviously isn’t directed at you.
However, for the people who were trying to decide to get a Model 3 or Model S, it highlights some misconceptions and answers some questions.

notting
Guest
notting

Well, I never had problems deciding if I want a bigger or a smaller car model from a car manufacturer, because price and size are very important for me.

When comes that guide for Renault Z.E.? (Twizy, Zoe, Kangoo, Master)
I’d prefer the Megane Z.E. …

notting

FFE1
Guest
FFE1

too long a and too wide – hmm – I disagree. I have a Ford Focus Electric and a Model S. The model S is more roomy and still pretty nimble. I am 6′-1, my Wife is 5’10 and my son is 6′-3. He fits in the S back seat comfortably – sot so much in the FFE. If I am running around and driving into town and some tight spaces – FFE every time. If I want to live large, go fast, and be comfortable – there is nothing that beats the S. In short – buy what works for you ar buy multiple cars. I don’t expect my Ford diesel pickup to do the same things as the S or vice versa. As far as software updates – you are better off letting the manufacturer handle and manage that I believe. I have never had any problems and love that I get updates without worrying about it.

Pushmi-Pullyu
Guest
Pushmi-Pullyu

notting said:

“I also completely dislike the permanent internet connection which is used be Tesaa to monitor my car permanentely resp. that I can’t avoid firmware updates by other drivers of my car resp. can’t downgrade in case of problems.”

Hmmm, I could be mistaken, but from discussion on the Tesla Motors Club forum I got the impression that you can revert to an older firmware version if you want to. Perhaps Tesla doesn’t make that easy, though.

As far as other drivers updating the firmware without your permission… isn’t there a security feature to lock out that option, one that would require entering a password or PIN to enable?

Juice13
Guest
Juice13

Thoughts on the Model S CPO market after Model 3 production ramps up? I can’t decide if more people are going to trade in the model S and make CPO model S prices lower, or will the model 3 reveal disappoint some and those people will flock to the CPO Model S thus maintaining high prices?

I’d rather have the smaller car, but those jump seats and more luggage room and longer range are mighty tempting for a family hauler and occasional carpool car. I’m not willing to spend much on autonomous driving capabilities so it might be a wash for me.

pjwood1
Guest
pjwood1

The most honest answer I can give:
-The Model 3 won’t be autonomous and will substantially require driver input
-Storage needs, and ease of hatch access, hold functional appeal for the ‘S’ (done “a bike” many times).
-‘S’ length is an urban/small quarters issue (parking sensors required, IMO)
-Deliberate, or not, the lack of dash (and message Elon is sending drivers), will support the CPO ‘S’.
-We have no idea where else Model 3 may have been cheapened. It’s REALLY tough not to lose money on this car (Bolt interior?). Will M3 have Bilsteins, ball jointed arms, as much un-sprung aluminum weight? -Important to some.

So far, we’ve seen lots of skin. Range/power will be there, but I think a lot more could be lost than just a driver friendly dash cluster.

Nix
Guest
Nix
It is the ICE car vs. EV market that will play a large factor in Tesla CPO’s. Believe it or not, but Tesla is still a relatively unknown car company. Pure EV market penetration is also still quite low compared to ICE cars. EV’s and Tesla’s doesn’t make it onto very many car buyer’s short list of cars to seriously consider for purchase. If Tesla’s Model 3 is a wild success, that may very well change both of those facts. Combine a sudden market shift towards EV’s in general, with more car buyers putting Tesla on their short list of brands to shop, and Tesla CPO demand is likely to go through the roof. Especially when people new to Tesla and EV’s find out there is a long wait list. We saw this happen before. CPO Roadster prices had dropped down to the low $40’s half a year before the Model S came out. Then as the Model S became reality, CPO Roadster prices went up to the 50’s and all their stock of CPO Roadsters quickly disappeared. We are actually seeing the start of that already. The best deals on CPO Model S’s was actually a little over a… Read more »
Brian
Guest
Brian

… range (“at least 215 miles for our starting model”). The latter part is interesting, since everything lately has led us to figure that the Model 3 will arrive with more range than that of the Chevrolet Bolt.

I don’t understand this, although I read it everywhere. The BASE Model 3 will have ~215 miles of range. But the Model 3 that will arrive this summer is not the base model. both of those are statements right out of Musk’s mouth (sorry, twitter-fingers). The base model will arrive later, with far fewer options and a smaller battery. It’s not that hard to figure, really.

Pushmi-Pullyu
Guest
Pushmi-Pullyu
There are contradictory indications, and different people are interpreting them different ways. The quote about “at least 215 miles of range” dates from before we knew that the Chevy Bolt EV is rated at 238 miles of electric range by the EPA. Since that time, Elon Musk responded to a question about whether the Model 3 would have more range than the Bolt EV by Tweeting “Oh so little faith.” A lot of people, including myself, think that means Tesla has tweaked the M3 to slightly edge out the Bolt EV’s range, even with the base battery pack. But others think Elon just meant the larger, perhaps 75 kWh battery pack will give the Model 3 more than 238 miles of range, which obviously won’t be hard! If it’s the latter, that means the initial offering of the M3 will have a range less than the Bolt EV, since we now know the initial offering for the M3 will be for only the base, smaller battery pack. We’ll have to wait and see who is right on the point. Personally I can’t see Tesla releasing the M3 with a range less than the Bolt EV, which would be terrible for… Read more »
Nix
Guest
Nix

“since we now know the initial offering for the M3 will be for only the base, smaller battery pack.”

I must have missed some news. I remember reading that the first cars would be RWD only. But I must have missed the news about the battery pack size. Can you point me to that info?

georgeS
Guest
georgeS
Should I trade in my Model S on a Model 3?? That’s a totally relevant question for me and I was hoping I’d find the answer in Tesla’s little blurb. Unfortunately it didn’t really help with my decision. Until I get to see a Model 3 and sit in it and price it out I have no way of knowing. The seating position is bad enough in the S and I suspect it will be even more “like sitting on the ground” in M3. At 68 my back doesn’t love a “sports car” seating position. Unfortunately that’s what I expect the M3 to have. Also the seats in my 2012 Model S are not very comfortable. That would be a desirable feature to improve IMO. I called the service center and they said there’s nothing they can do. Perhaps I could get some newer higher tech seats out of a newer Model S salvage. Also not sure I want one of the first M3’s due to early production teething problems. The problem is the tax credit goes away soon so it’s a tough decision Auto Pilot- don’t have now on my 2012 and desperately want….but is it worth 5000$???. Buying… Read more »
Pushmi-Pullyu
Guest
Pushmi-Pullyu

“Should I trade in my Model S for a Model 3?”

Kinda hard to do that when Tesla hasn’t started production on the M3 yet. 😉

I think the time for that discussion will be after at least a few professional car reviewers and at least a few ordinary retail buyers have given their opinions about the M3. And even then, the question can’t be fully answered for at least a year or so after the first owners take possession, and report on the reliability of the car.

georgeS
Guest
georgeS

@PMPU

I have all the patience in the world.
I’m already driving a Model S:)

Pushmi-Pullyu
Guest
Pushmi-Pullyu

The article says:

As Elon Musk has pointed out recently, the Model 3 is not meant to be Tesla’s “Version 3.” Whereas the Model X is essentially a Model S, which satisfies a different segment (SUV), the Model 3 is not the “next generation Tesla.”

Wow, I don’t think I’ve ever seen any auto maker spokesman speak out so strongly against a new model. I guess Elon is really worried about the Osborne Effect stealing sales from the Models S and X!

Dear Elon:

Protest as strongly as you like, put as much spin on it as you’re able, but you can’t argue against the reality that the Model 3 does represent the next generation, the third generation, of Tesla cars, according to the original vision of Tesla’s founders… which does not include you, despite your claims.

The original plan was for three generations of vehicles: Darkstar, Whitestar, and Bluestar. The Darkstar (named after the cult science fiction movie “Dark Star”) became the Roadster; the Whitestar became the Model S; and the Bluestar will be the Model 3.

And you know that, so stop pretending otherwise.

William
Guest
William

Did you just unabashedly, throw some shade on the almighty St. Elon? The Tesla Founders are going to take you to the wood shed, if you aren’t careful with your playing of the oldies and originals like “Musk-rat Love”!

Any Tesla controversy that is stirred up, is just to get more media spotlight on what may be Teslas biggest and most successful vehicle launch in the companies history. Looks like all the pomp and circumstance, has those among us frothing at the mouth about petty vehicle generation semantics.

Let the automotive historians battle it out, after the fact, on who did what when! Let’s get The Model 3 production line up and running so there is a story to actually tell!

Roy_H
Guest
Roy_H

You absolutely have that wrong. The original founders Eberhard etc. had no vision of Tesla becoming a major auto manufacturer, they were solely focused on niche market of higher end sports cars. It was Elon who wanted the follow-on WhiteStar etc.

Roy_H
Guest
Roy_H

A lot of people seem to be concerned about Tesla running out of tax credits. The tax credit program was intended to allow companies to jump start electric production and achieve high volume so the economies of high volume production would kick in. This is exactly what Tesla is trying to do. If they succeed in timing it right, they will be able to reduce the price just as the tax credit runs out.