Tesla Model S Sales Card U.S. – Exclusive InsideEVs Sales Infographic

JAN 14 2015 BY MARK KANE 11

It’s time for Tesla Model S sales to be placed on our new sales graphs to see what the results are.

Tesla doesn’t report numbers, so we base these figures on InsideEVs’ estimates, always striving to be well below 5% error per quarter.

Okay, so Model S potentially had its best month ever in the U.S. in December with 3,500 units delivered, however total numbers for the year stand at 17,000, which is approximately the same as in 2013. There are explanations why, but any way you look at it, there is basically no growth in Model S sales in 2014, as compared to 2013.

Interesting is that a luxury car, available since 2012, was still able to pick-up some 13% of all plug-in cars sold in the U.S. since December 2010.

While U.S. deliveries exceeded 37,000, worldwide numbers crossed 50,000 and this is significant too.

 U.S. – Tesla Model S Card – December 2014

U.S. – Tesla Model S Card – December 2014

Categories: Sales, Tesla

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11 Comments on "Tesla Model S Sales Card U.S. – Exclusive InsideEVs Sales Infographic"

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On december 23rd 2014 I picked up a Model S with an id close to 59500. I guess, they are counting the same way, they did it with the Roadster. So, there should be at least 60000 out on the roads.

Lustuccc

Yep, and about 73 000 sold as now.

pjwood

Technically, I don’t think Tesla books the sale revenue of a reservation holder/depositor.

Nix

PJ — You are correct. Tesla is very clear in there quarterly SEC reports that their sales numbers they report only include units that have actually been delivered and the payment collected. Reservations don’t show up anywhere in their official numbers.

Someone

As Elon Musk said in the interview clip you posted earlier today, Tesla makes and ships cars in batches so a month-by-month comparison isn’t really a good metric.

This would really by much more useful if it was a combined US / International series of graphs.

In any case, Tesla, BMW and Nissan seemed to have had great 2014 sales. It will be interesting to see the growth for 2015.

Scott Snyder

Please be aware Elon also explained that what is being estimated and reported as sales is really shipments. Since where shipments go is decided by Tesla, and we do not having any clue to their reasoning, it is possible that the US shipments number doesn’t represent anything to do with demand. Of course, their are limits to this as I couldn’t believe Tesla would keep expanding to different countries if they didn’t think they could nearly meet demand in the already established countries. But it is reasonable to expect that demand could still be 15 or 20% higher than shipments. For instance, the Model X has no shipments but its orders exceed 20,000.

Mike I

Since Tesla is trying to make their quarterly numbers, they try to produce cars for overseas delivery early in the quarter and focus on USA, especially West Coast at the end of the quarter. By doing this, they maximize the percentage of cars produced that are actually delivered to customers. This was obviously happening with the heavy concentration of CA deliveries of P85Ds in December 2014. Not only did that increase the number of cars delivered, but it increased the average selling price and profit margin at the end of the quarter.

ffbj

Musk is heading to Texas. Oh to be a fly on the wall at that meeting. Musk tipped his hand a bit in that if Texas is so all fired pro business ala the Dell reference, then why are they keeping Tesla out? Somewhat rhetorical in the sense that we all know, or should know, the answer. Because of the oil interests, the powerful ADA, with their money and politicians in their pockets, I would think it would be a tough rodeo for Mr. Musk. Though he does have a few aces in the hole. Well I think that is enough Texas references, even for me ya’ll.

PHEVfan

Interesting to me is that last graph. While the rest of the Plug-in world’s sales are still on a (somewhat) exponential curve, Tesla’s seem to be pretty linear.

I think market saturation is going to hurt them until they can branch out (SUV model X, and low cost Model 3).