Tesla Model S To Compete For First Time Ever At Pikes Peak Hill Climb

MAY 20 2016 BY MARK KANE 15

2014 Pikes Peak Int. Hill Climb

Pikes Peak Int. Hill Climb

Tesla Model S P90D Ludicrous

Tesla Model S P90D Ludicrous

The Pikes Peak International Hill Climb will see its first ever entry of a Tesla Model S for 2016.

The P90D version of the Tesla sedan will be the only EV contender in the production class this year.  The car is brought by Blake Fuller, founder and CEO of Go Puck wearable battery packs.

There is not much details about the Model S itself, but some sources suggest that the battery will be slightly modified/lighter.   Although for us, we are not sure whether this modification will ultimately keep the Model S in the production class.

“Fuller wants to break the 13 minute record in the Electric Production class and in order to do so, he developed a new battery pack for his Model S which is 80 per cent lighter than the factory one.

Details are scarce at the moment but we understand that the lighter battery pack will have a significantly smaller capacity, since having a long driving range doesn’t really matter in racing (as long as the car passes the finishing line).”

Update (June 26th):  Fuller’s Model S set a new record in the “Production Electric Car” class, but CarScoops’ original report of a heavy modified version of the Model S, specifically the battery was inaccurate, as it ultimately ran near-stock, less 800lbs of extra weight removed.

In 2014, a Honda Fit EV was able to do 12 minutes and 55.591 seconds, so one assumes the Model S will have little effort setting a new record (modifications or not). As for the racing cars, like last year’s winner – the eO PP03, it did the job in 9 minutes and 7.222 seconds.

Five electric cars and five electric motorcycles seem to be present in 2016, with two heavy weight e0PP100 and Tajima-Rimac entries:

Running Entry List

2016 Pikes Peak International Hill Climb (100th Anniversary & 94th) - Running Entry List

2016 Pikes Peak International Hill Climb (100th Anniversary & 94th) – Running Entry List

2016 Pikes Peak International Hill Climb (100th Anniversary & 94th) - Running Entry List

2016 Pikes Peak International Hill Climb (100th Anniversary & 94th) – Running Entry List

source: Carscoops

Categories: Racing, Tesla

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15 Comments on "Tesla Model S To Compete For First Time Ever At Pikes Peak Hill Climb"

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From Article: “…The P90D by…Blake Fuller, founder and CEO of Go Puck wearable battery packs…he developed a new battery pack for his Model S which is 80 per cent lighter than the factory one..”
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A great marketing angle for Go Puck would be to string togethe off-the-shelf Go Pucks.

“he developed a new battery pack for his Model S which is 80 per cent lighter than the factory one.”

I’m calling BS on this. Well . . . misleading anyway. I assume he has slashed the range way down so he will only have enough battery power to make the drive up the hill. But it will be impressive if that smaller battery pack can still provide the power needed to drive the ludicrous mode acceleration.

Speculawyer writes “it will be impressive if that smaller battery pack can still provide the power needed to drive the ludicrous mode acceleration.”

A123 has been a major force in EV drag racing for more than a decade, because their power/weight ratio is so fantastic. Tesla doesn’t use them in its cars, though, because their energy/weight ratio isn’t good at all. I think you can get as much power from 200 pounds of A123 cells as you can from 1,000 pounds of the Li-Ion cells Tesla is using. But instead of holding, say, 40kWHours of energy, they’d hold more like 3KWHours worth. Will it be enough to power the car ALL THE WAY up the hill? Hard to say. But it will surely be powerful enough.

Nice. I hope they have a great driver as I’m sure that is VERY important for that road.

It’s not production if you change the battery pack to something 80% lighter. IMHO, that’s now in the modified category.

The big question is whether the Model S reach the peak without going into reduced power mode.

Does anyone know whether the record-setting Honda Fit EV was modified or stock?

From basic Physics, it won’t run out of energy to result in reduced power mode. But it _may_ (or may not) hit it due to heat depending on how wastefully it’s driven. Obviously, simple driving will not do anything. I suspect that’s why FitEV was able to make it.

IIRC, one of the reasons the Tesla goes into reduced power mode besides the battery and inverter overheating is because of rotor heat in its AC induction motor, which is cooled by coolant flowing through the shaft. To increase cooling you have to increase the flow of coolant and/or increase the size of radiators to dump the heat in the coolant. But the Honda Fit EV also had an AC induction electric motor (AC synchronous). I also recall a story about a Tesla at the race track where they temporarily walled off the underside of the car with Styrofoam pieces and pumped cold refrigerated air under the Tesla. They did this to lower the temperature of the battery pack right before starting a run on the race track, which apparently delayed or eliminated the battery going into reduced power mode.

We know Tesla will overheat if pushed hard long enough. The question is if it’ll overheat for race duration at close to peak power. I don’t think it’ll overheat if driven at FitEV level, so I expect the time to be better than FitEV while best time will depend on if overheating occurs. We’ll find out after the race whether the time was heat limited or best possible time.

By the way, where’s SparkEV in this competition? To paraphrase Biff, “Hello? Is anybody home?”

I doubt it, unless he also modifies the cooling system. As I mentioned about the Model 3 front fascia, a real front grill with a real radiator would actually be useful.

No Tesla has ever completed any race track without overheating. And I don’t mean the Nurburgring or Autobahn driving. Since the P85 to the P90D, they never fixed the overheating issue and every time the mainstream car mags take it out to Willow Springs or Laguna Seca, it has always performed poorly.

See:
http://www.motortrend.com/news/2013-tesla-model-s-p85-update-4/
“Following our Mazda Raceway experience, two encounters had me re-thinking the situation. At a Supercharger station in Gilroy, I coincidentally spoke with a Tesla engineer and explained what had happened. “What you need to do is put the car in something like a big meat locker,” he suggested. “Cool it way down first.”

Even DragTimes’ own Tesla goes into reduced power mode with back-to-back drag races.

“since having a long driving range doesn’t really matter in racing”
——–
More battery = more power though

Come on guys, include the DATE of the event in the article. The 2016 PPIHC is being held on June 26th.

Better run that car up the hill a few times to make sure it’s gonna work.. if that thing craps out.. they’ll all be laughing and dissing Tesla.. maybe Tesla should run it’s own car besides.. can’t risk this modified thing soiling the ‘ole rep at this point… c’mon Tesla.. get on this and do it right! A MS P90DL doing this right gets more miles than those dumb gull wing doors flapping between two other closely parked cars when no one can get in or out of any of them anyway!!

Don’t we expect a EVs to win over all this year? Last year they took 2nd and 3rd and would have taken 1st if one of the motors hadn’t died.?

To all those saying cooling the Tesla, or cooling the battery pack, keep in mind that cold li-ion batteries have reduced output and capacity, and any brake regeneration is either deactivated or may damage the cells by creating dendrites. Sacrificing initial power for endurance? Could work, will be interesting to see.