Tesla Model S – Comparing & Contrasting Metallic Blue & Deep Blue Metallic Paints – Photos & Video

JUN 18 2015 BY MIKE ANTHONY 9

Tesla Model S new Deep Blue Metallic (left) & Metallic Blue (Right)

Tesla Model S new Deep Blue Metallic (left) & Metallic Blue (Right)

Recently, I was able to check out two Tesla Model S sedans, each with one of the two available blue paint options.

Unfortunately, the cars were inside a parking garage, so the lighting is far from ideal.

But still, I hope the video aboveĀ helps to provide for some comparing & contrasting of both blue metallic paint options.

The Deep Blue Metallic is one of three new colors offered. As I mentioned in the video, the traditional Metallic Blue is still available, though it is not listed on the website, where you option out the Model S.

There are a few photos here, and the rest can be found towards the end of the video above as part of a walkaround of both Model S EVs.

Which color do you prefer? The original Metallic Blue, or the new Deep Blue Metallic?

Metallic Blue (Still able to get)

Metallic Blue (Still able to order)

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9 Comments on "Tesla Model S – Comparing & Contrasting Metallic Blue & Deep Blue Metallic Paints – Photos & Video"

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Tom
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Tom

I have the dark blue and over the last 6 months I find keeping it clean and looking good is a lot of work. When dirty, or in low light, it looks black. I normally own red cars and in retrospect I should’ve got the red…

EVer
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EVer

both are bland and would never be a consideration

its like why even buy the car if its going to be that color, might as well get a corolla

Steven
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Steven

Let me guess.

You’re a friend of See Through.

pjwood1
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pjwood1

Related. I took a paint depth gauge to a Volt, a Sig 85 and a 2015 85, and was surprised to find the black Volt rounding down to 0 mils, the metallic 2015 Tesla at 2, and the metallic signature car at between 3 and 4. I believe the early Teslas were hand sprayed.

I don’t think thin means “bad”, necessarily, but it was a surprising variation, car to car. I wonder how thick a GM metallic would be?

Chris B
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Chris B

The new blue is world’s better – could be brighter still. The midnight blues end up just as Tom suggests – mistaken for black half the time, but never as “sharp” as a full-on black car…yet with all the “keep it clean” hassles of black. I felt the same way when I saw the original blue in person. It reminded me of BMW’s Carbon Black Metallic (really a midnight blue) – a great color, but only under the “right” conditions.

Anon
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Anon

I like the new blue. Bolder, but not garish.

My fave, is still the warm silver / titanium, first shown on a Model X prototype.

Phr3d
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Phr3d

Do the same for the Green and they might sell a few more of that color as well.

More color = Better IMHO, and more choices ala BMW’s options would be better still. Many people dropping $100k for a Second car are very willing to drop another $5-10k for a proper-color super-quality paint job, nearly impossible to do after the build.
jus’ sayin’

Lensman
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Lensman

Too bad these photos are not taken in natural light conditions.

As it is, these two colors look like merely two more of the innumerable shades of gray which modern car makers seem obsessed with.

I’ll be very glad to see the end of the current “shades of gray” era in automobile paint colors, and we again start seeing some brightly painted automobiles in colors other than red!

Now here is a Tesla (Roadster, not Model S) that’s not afraid to display a gorgeous, bold color:

Lauren
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Lauren

You said the old Tesla blue is still available, how do you order it for a new Tesla?