Tesla Model S 85 kWh 0 to 60 MPH Test – Video


0 to 60 MPH at 4.9 Seconds

0 to 60 MPH at 4.9 Seconds

Officially, per Tesla Motors, the 85 kWh version (non Performance) of the Tesla Model S does the 0 to 60 MPH sprint in 5.4 seconds.

DragTimes discovered this 5.4-second time to be easily beat when it tested the Model S 85 kWh.

How’s 0 to 60 MPH in 4.9 seconds sound?  That was DragTimes was able to achieve in the Model S 85 kWh

As DragTimes states:

“We had some time with a 2014 Tesla Model S 85, the non-performance version and did a quick 0-60 MPH test run with the Vbox. Tesla rates the Model S 85 at 362HP and a 0-60 MPH time of 5.4 seconds. With the battery at less than 50% the Model S ran 0-60 in 4.9 seconds and 0-100 in 12.4 seconds.”

“While this is well ahead of Tesla’s quoted numbers, we think it will do even better with a full charge.”

Category: TeslaVideos


21 responses to "Tesla Model S 85 kWh 0 to 60 MPH Test – Video"
  1. MDEV says:

    I have the S85 and yes is 0-60 below 5 seconds

  2. EV says:

    0-60 times are always different and usually quicker than stated.

    Tesla probably got in the 4 second time frame for the S85 but wanted to show a full second difference for the performance version.

    Because whats the point in getting a “performance” version for $10,000 more that only does 0-60 .7 seconds quicker?

  3. Mark says:

    Why would it be faster on a 100% charge than 50%?

    1. James says:

      Because the battery would be able to supply more power when full (the same current but at higher voltage). However because the acceleration will be determined by the power supplied to the motor by the inverter, I suspect that it won’t make any difference to the acceleration in this case.

      1. Unplugged says:

        And beside, all the electricity in the battery has to weigh something. 😉

  4. EvDeath says:

    After the runs it likely went into the limp home mode like in Germany.

    1. Foo says:


      1. EvDeath says:

        Troll as in not everyone is a koolade drinking sycophant.

        Read then apologize.


        1. Boris says:

          EvDeath, you are a good source of amusement I have to say. You don’t like Tesla for whatever reason, but something must bring you here everyday, what is it? I ran across websites where I didn’t agree with what was said either in articles or in comments section, but after reading the comments I left and that was it, but you keep coming back, why, please let me know, I am interested.

        2. erandall38 says:

          So a professional race car driver said a tesla is not a “track weapon”. Do you think that really matters or has relevance to the every day consumer who purchases these?

          Professional race car driver says the Tesla is not a track weapon, but was very impressed with overall with the car.

          That sounds like a win to me. These are not made for the track… hence why they don’t drive like one, yet professional race car drivers still find them impressive. That is phenomenal.

          1. EvDeath says:

            What really matters is that after only 3 minutes of high performance the S-85 went into limp home mode. This has nothing to do with it’s numb handling or a lack of mechanical, although there is that. It’s another example,one of many, of real world performance not living up to all the hype. Tesla self markets as a performance sedan. 0-60 times are all a part of how the car is positioned, yet when you try to use that performance as you could in any car costing 1/3 as much, it lays down.

            The S is a nice EV granted, the best ever made. But it’s still an EV and with that comes all the deficiencies that separate EVs from normal cars and reduce their usefulness. No amount of hypermile driving, no amount of superchargers and no amount of hype (although there are boundless amounts) is ever going to change that.

            1. erandall38 says:

              Do you live on a racetrack? I live in a city. I assume most consumers who buy Teslas do not live on racetrack either. There really isn’t that much opportunity for you to take advantage of those specs beyond 0-60 anyways. And the times that there are… the Tesla performance does just fine for the general consumer. 95% of the population is not going to know the difference between a 5 second 0 – 60 and a 4 second 0 – 60. To them it is just “Fast”. To them, a Tesla is just “fast” in the situation they get to test it in.Ever taken a boat in triple digits? 85 MPH gives you the same level of wanting to shit your pants as 110 MPH.

              Comparing a Tesla to a car 1/4 the cost is not really relevant. Most buyers of a Tesla are not in that price range. I am looking at buying a Tesla. If I decide against it… will I buy something 1/4 the cost? Hell no! Leave that to the kids who like to rev their engines at the stop lights. I have no interest in anything 1/4 the cost and neither do most guys looking at buying a Tesla. I will likely buy an M5 if I decide against the Tesla. A Tesla and an M5 are comparable for what most consumers use those vehicles for. I understand you might be a race car driver, so the Tesla doesn’t work… don’t buy it. But for most consumers, they are not race car drivers. They are using it as a mode of transportation and of course some side enjoyment. So in that sense Tesla provides plenty of “performance” to be labeled a performance sedan. Again, performance that 95% of the population are not going to know the difference in.

              You seem to insinuate people are buying a Tesla purely because it is a performance Sedan. Think about that… you think people are buying an EV for performance?! That is absolutely not the case. The performance it provides is just a bonus on top of owning an EV car. People who buy Teslas see it as exactly what it is, a performance EV. They get a little of both. Is it a good EV? Apparently it is “best ever made”. Will most who buy it be able to tell the difference between performance on their way to work? Not a chance.

              You seem to be very experienced performance car driver, sounds like that is specifically what you use your cars for. So don’t buy a car made for EV that happens to offer above average performance, buy a car made for performance that has top end performance.

              1. EvDeath says:

                No matter how hard you try you can’t run away from the fact the Tesla is marketed as a performance car…from the roadster to the P-85. Any guess what the P stands for? The hypocrisy here is the Tesla can provide brisk acceleration, but only for short moments. In addition it has numb steering and will understeer off the side of the road if pushed hard. Hardly performance material.

                The reality was the Model-S couldn’t even complete one lap of the Nordschleife at speed. Even a Toyota Camry can do that. And at a faster speed.

                I have no problem with the Model-S’s embarrassing performance on track, but it does point to another problem, sustained performance at highway speeds.

                Going up the Grapevine or up Baker Grade outside LA, at highway speed, say 80 mph or so is something of interest to the average driver and something the Model-S probably can’t do.

                If the Tesla performance hype had been in context like high performance for an EV I would feel differently, but it wasn’t. The claims are always in absolute terms…faster than a 911 and so on.

                BTW I wasn’t suggesting cross shopping a Tesla with a Camry. No one would actually cross shop the two. I am suggesting that in real world performance, where it counts a Camry is superior.

                I really can’t understand why would buy a M-5 and not enjoy it’s performance.

                1. Jon says:

                  If you want a better track performing car, you would need to get the P85+, among other things in the + package they change how the car cools itself slightly. It still isn’t a track car, but it is much better. Having heard conversation about it from the designers, if they wanted to make a track car they would have to just manipulate how the car cools itself. Right now it waits until it is hot before doing anything, whereas if you were intentionally tracking the car, you would want to kick the cooling on BEFORE it needed it. They could make a track car if they wanted… the thing is, making a “race worthy” car is simply a marketing tool… They don’t need more marketing… they can’t keep up with the demand they already have. Give them a couple years and I am sure we will see a true track car come from them and it will be fantastic!

                2. Liuping says:

                  “Going up the Grapevine or up Baker Grade outside LA, at highway speed, say 80 mph or so is something of interest to the average driver and something the Model-S probably can’t do.”

                  Well that news to me. I’ve had no problems going over the Grapevine at 80MPH in my lowly “non performance” Model S 85….

                3. Haeze says:

                  EVDeath, you seem to equate Race driving at Nordschleife with driving at high speed on a highway. I think you may want to attend an event in Nordschleife some time. The fact that a Tesla gets too hot while race driving is because you are constantly accelerating at max output, then slamming on the brakes, then doing it again. Any car without massive cooling capability will overheat in those conditions. With typical highway driving a Tesla actually never even gets warm (I drive mine at 80+ MPH for stretches over an hour at a time and never have seen the overheat warning).

                  You are imagining a problem that doesn’t exist.

                4. tc says:


                  “Going up the Grapevine or up Baker Grade outside LA, at highway speed, say 80 mph or so is something of interest to the average driver and something the Model-S probably can’t do.”

                  I was agreeing with your thoughts on the Model S not being a very good track car, but with the statement above it is apparent that you have no first hand knowledge of the car period. Not many cars can keep up with my S85 going up the Grapevine. The car has so much torque it’s like the steep hill is not even there. Same thing with the Hwy 80 climb to Tahoe. Absolutely no issue whatsoever in sustaining 90-100 MPH on a steep climb for 50 miles.

                  You having no experience with the car and sitting there pontificating based on internet articles you read is not helping your credibility. Unfortunately this is the usual case for Tesla detractors. I really wish you could take the car out for a day and experience it in the real world environment first hand. You seem like an intelligent person otherwise, so until you can have actual experience your time could be better spent talking about subjects you actually understand.

  5. ffbj says:

    Drinking the koolaid is both crass, and never really made any sense, since the people that drank it all died. I suppose that it was meant to imply people who are followers with no minds of their own to make decisions. Since EvDeath has not drunk the koolaid, he is smarter than all those brain dead sycophants, such as myself.
    That, in my view, is why he comes here.

    1. JL says:

      Haha. Though everyone entitles to an opinion of their own. It takes time for Tesla to grow. The company does not make perfect cars, but neither is the world we live in. I choose a Model S for it’s safety rating, HOV and practicality, not a M5 for its performance. Simple.

      1. Phr3d says:

        and (if anyone cares), the First M5 (e12 M535i) from 1980, tended to overheat and crack its Very Expensive (I still have the 1986-dollars bill) aluminum head, as the cooling was not quite sufficient. It also tended to oversteer like a 911 turbo.
        The e28 M5 got most of the overheating issues sorted out, and was no longer scary on oversteer, though it could still wind up pointing-where-you-came-from if you lost concentration. In Only one generation, and three years of owner/track inputs.

        Thankfully, at that time we didn’t have the empowerment of internet with its abundant wealth of caring and studious people focusing on its singular inabilities.

        The Green Hell is called that for a reason, no matter What some agenda-laden thumpers would like for you to believe.

        It’s a dizzying wonder what ICE’s can accomplish after only a century of specialized development.


  6. Scott says:

    Why is anyone arguing with a troll who has preconceived NON first hand knowledge? His name alone (EVDeath) should tell you “it” has an agenda big time. And no amount of actual experience or facts would change its mind.