Tesla Model S 100D Sets Production EV Range Record Of 1,078 km/670 Miles On Single Charge

2 months ago by Mark Kane 18

1078 km – 669.83 miles with Tesla ModelS 100D in a single charge by Tesla Owners Italy-Ticino-San Marino

Tesla CEO Elon Musk said achieving 1,000 km on a single charge in a Model S 100D was possible and now it’s been done.

On August 3, 2017, Tesla Owners Italia completed the 27 hour marathon of driving a Tesla Model S 100D at approximately 40 km/h (25 mph) to cover 1,078 km (669.83 miles) on a single charge.

That’s the new record for the longest distance covered on a single charge in a Tesla ever, and well above the 1,000 km mark stated was possible by Elon Musk two month ago.

The team managed to set the record using just 91 Wh per km, in total using 98.4 kWh.

Here’s some video posted following the drive. Video description:

“We beat the world record, 1078 km with Tesla Model S 100 D Series. The new world record is ours, all Italian!”

Tesla CEO Elon Musk even took to Twitter to congratulate Tesla Owners Italy and to verify that the drive indeed set a new record, not just for a Tesla, but for any production electric car ever!


Here are some photos (all via Tesla Owners Italy-Ticino-R. San Marino on Facebook) from the attempt:

1078 km – 669.83 miles with Tesla ModelS 100D in a single charge by Tesla Owners Italy-Ticino-San Marino

1078 km – 669.83 miles with Tesla ModelS 100D in a single charge by Tesla Owners Italy-Ticino-San Marino

1078 km – 669.83 miles with Tesla ModelS 100D in a single charge by Tesla Owners Italy-Ticino-San Marino

1078 km – 669.83 miles with Tesla ModelS 100D in a single charge by Tesla Owners Italy-Ticino-San Marino

1078 km – 669.83 miles with Tesla ModelS 100D in a single charge by Tesla Owners Italy-Ticino-San Marino

1078 km – 669.83 miles with Tesla ModelS 100D in a single charge by Tesla Owners Italy-Ticino-San Marino

Source: Tesla Owners Italy via Electrek

Tags: , , , , , , ,

18 responses to "Tesla Model S 100D Sets Production EV Range Record Of 1,078 km/670 Miles On Single Charge"

  1. SparkEV says:

    91 Wh/km = 6.87 mi/kWh. since they got 670 miles, energy used would be 97.5 kWh. Is that the usable capacity on S 100D or was some “lost” in something not shown and the actual usable is 100 kWh?

    1. Mint says:

      The picture shows 98.4kWh used for 1078km, so the exact efficiency is probably 91.3 Wh/km.

      I guess 1.6kWh is unusable.

      1. Jim Whitehead says:

        You have just discovered the hidden magic reserve: almost 2kWh. Its necessary to keep the big battery from dying at “zero” charge.

        1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

          Right.

          Nobody should expect any EV to be able to use full nameplate capacity. The usable capacity of the battery pack will always be less, so long as they’re using li-ion batteries.

          In fact, if the reserve is only 1.6 kWh out of 100 kWh, then I find that surprising. EV engineers not only want to reserve some “room at the bottom” to prevent bricking, they also want to reserve some “room at the top” because charging li-ion batteries to 100% of manufacturer rated capacity wears them out much faster than leaving a bit of margin, say 2% or so.

          But then, Tesla rounds off the actual capacity of its packs to the nearest 5 kWh, so perhaps that “100 kWh” battery pack actually has 101 or 102 kWh of batteries, as rated by Panasonic.

        2. Rick says:

          that 20% reserve is like an “idiot light” that use no power.

  2. Another Euro point of view says:

    What about driving at 5 mph average speed ? What would be the range then ? Come on Tesla Italia. You can do better !

    1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

      From what I’ve read, the “sweet spot” of maximum energy efficiency in a highway-capable EV is generally around 20-25 MPH. At very low speeds, energy efficiency is actually lower because (if my understanding is correct) too great a percentage of energy expended gets wasted on overcoming mechanical friction; friction which isn’t reduced much at lower speeds.

      1. SparkEV says:

        It’s not for overcoming friction. Car requires minimum level of energy use regardless of speed. At very low speed, that can be more than the energy used to propel the car.

        For SparkEV, static power is about 1 kW (less with lights off, etc). To propel the car at 17 MPH require about 1 kW for 2 kW total, about 9 mi/kWh.

        But if one drove at 10 MPH, static power is still 1 kW, but propel power might only be 0.6 kW, less than static power for car. 10 / 1.6 results in only 6.25 mi/kWh.

        Since the battery capacity is constant, range and efficiency are directly related.

  3. Rick says:

    To use fewer electrons, replace road rage with driving Zen

  4. Bacardi says:

    Just makes you wonder why doesn’t Musk offer “the right tires” as an option?

    1. Gordon says:

      The right tyres for range are not the right tyres to turn corners or stop in the wet. The tyres we have on our cars give us the best balance between what we need them to do.

  5. Bruce Miller says:

    Aluminum Storage Breakthrough
    The accidental discovery of a novel aluminium alloy that reacts with water in a highly unusual way may be the first step to reviving the struggling hydrogen economy. It could offer a convenient and portable source of hydrogen for fuel cells and other applications, potentially transforming the energy market and providing an alternative to batteries and liquid fuels.
    https://www.newscientist.com/article/2142693-nano-aluminium-offers-fuel-cells-on-demand-just-add-water/#.WYU4xugiRsM.facebook

    1. Mark.ca says:

      Talk about complicating things even more then they need to be.

  6. ModernMarvelFan says:

    Seriously, why bother?

    We have known this since day one of EV ages. The older Tesla S85 broken its range record at avg speed of 25mph. Nissan LEAF did it too so did the first generation and 2nd gen Volt with their respective max range per charge.

    The 1,000kM just happens to be a nice “round” number. But any EV owner would have known that max range is achieved at 25mph for just about all EVs.

    1. SparkEV says:

      More than the range, I’m more interested in efficiency when using all usable battery. EPA rates Tesla in low 3 mi/kWh (~100 MPGe / 33.7 kWh/gal), but 25 MPH shows 6.87 mi/kWh.

      Battery rundown with Leaf achieved about 7 mi/kWh. SparkEV achieved 7.3 mi/kWh and still the king of efficiency.

  7. James says:

    Real world range competitions should be the measure.

    25mph? Big deal. Where on earth can you drive anywhere at 25mph but city streets and neighborhoods?

    True, bumper-to-bumper traffic adds into real world range – but in a competition like this it would be better to see several cars out on the same roads in the same conditions all going for max range by using hypermiling techniques and keeping average speed to 40-45mph.

    This is just a number. Stupid to say – “we can prove how far an electric car can go ….er, at 25mph”!…

  8. James says:

    The funniest ones are when they take a Nissan LEAF on a closed course at 25 mph with no traffic.

    What are they thinking? Does that prove anything at all?

Leave a Reply