Tesla Launches “Drive To Believe” – Enter For A Chance To Test Drive Model S For One Week

Tesla

NOV 22 2016 BY ERIC LOVEDAY 28

Tesla has launched a competition of sorts over in Europe where the prize is a one-week test drive of a Tesla Model S.

You must enter for a chance to be selected for the one-week test drive, but the only requirements seem to be that you live in one of the European countries listed below and that you be at least 25 years of age or older and that you’re willing to give up your current car for a week.

  • UK
  • Germany
  • Netherlands
  • Norway
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • France
  • Austria
  • Belgium
  • Finland
  • Luxembourg
  • Italy
  • Denmark
  • Ireland

Here’s what the entry form looks like:

believe-2

And here’s the link to the site to submit your entry.

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28 Comments on "Tesla Launches “Drive To Believe” – Enter For A Chance To Test Drive Model S For One Week"

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This surely must be a sign that they are on the brink of bankruptcy. Time to short!
In all seriousness though, a week with an EV is a great way to really let people see if it will work with their life.

Would that make you Happy?

damn, now who has really head of an over 25s?

Great Business Model. Try, then buy! Now, bring it everywhere! Tesla can advertise this, and get more cars out on the streets. I wonder if these are preowned testers or low mile demonstrators.

Nissan does it with Leaf for a couple of years already. Test drive for a day, three or extended, for a week. No competition – just fill the form in or call to dealership to book you in 🙂 in uk you’re getting 20min Tesla test drive, an hour if you’re lucky

What do you think of this guys. A model 3 for $35,000 and a tax refund for $7,500. Then you use $6,500 for a Powerwall 2. Then add $2,000 to the remaining $1,000 and buy solar panels worth for them. Now at a price of $0.3 per watt that will give 10,000 Watt peak power from the solar. Let us assume that the average will be 7. 5 kW and at 3,500 good sunny hours per year we get 26,250 kWh of energy per year. Now the average house in the US consumes 10,812 kWh per year https://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.cfm?id=97&t=3 So 26,250 -10,812=15,438 kWh left to use for the car. Assume a 100 w/mile that is 15,000 miles per year. Not bad. Now assume and God forbid that you have to replace the roof. And the cost of the new roof that generates electricity is less than the one that doesn’t and needs panels for $3,000 to do the job mentioned above. I ask you is it not worth it to have a new roof a car a Powerwall 2 and have electricity for life and a car that will run 15,000 miles for free every year for as long as the… Read more »

Your analysis is faulty.

Why?

Because 10kw of solar is $20,000 not $3,000. And thats if you install it yourself. Not counting permits or anything else. And the $7500 credit will be long gone by the time the $35,000 Model 3 is released. That’s if anyone else is actually able to purchase a stripped Model 3 for $35k. Nice happy thoughts though. I hope you’re right

And a Tesla doesn’t get 100watt hours per mile, its more like 350 watt hrs per mile. Even my Leaf driven very slowly only gets 250 watt hr per mile. Where did you get your numbers that are so far off? Do you even drive an electric car?

And a 10kw solar array will generate 18,000 kwh a year not 26,000. Do you need me to go on? Almost every equation in your analysis is faulty. And i dont even have solar yet.

Here is where I got my solar panels from.
http://www.enfsolar.com/pv/panel

Peder Norby has done a pretty good job at this kind of math. You might check out his website. He gets some different numbers than you do. For example, he uses $2.99 dollars per watt Solar, not $0.30 dollars per watt Solar.

Of course this post may be out of date now, due to dropping solar prices, but a full order of magnitude between your post and his math raises a red flag:

http://electric-bmw.blogspot.com/2016/06/the-thermal-age-is-endingsunshine-is.html

Are you going to drive your Model 3 flat out all the time at a speed of 60 miles per hour in the rain up hill?

The Model S85 has an EPA range rating of 265 miles, which comes to 320.8 Wh/mile.

We can assume the Model ≡ will be somewhat more energy efficient, but your figure of 100 Wh/mile is very far from realistic. Even the surprisingly energy efficient Hyundai Ioniq needs (28 kWh for 126 miles* =) 222.2 Wh/mile. It’s doubtful that the Model ≡ will best that by much.

*Hyundai voluntarily lowered the claimed range to 124 miles, but the actual testing numbers say 126 mile combined range.

Alaa lives in Egypt and they use less power there… LOL.

The $7,500 tax credit won’t be “long gone” by the time the $35,000 Model 3 ships, and here is why. The biggest reason is that the $7,500 tax credit applies to U.S.A. cars only, but Tesla ships more than 50% of its cars overseas. Tesla has sold 98,000 cars in the U.S.A. so far, according to the data on this site. There is no way they will ship 102,000 Model S and Model X cars during Q4 2016 and through all of 2017 into the U.S.A. only. They will probably deliver more than 102,000 cars worldwide, but less than half into the U.S.A. – taking them perhaps to 150,000 or 160,000 cars in the U.S.A.. Therefore, by the time the first Model 3 cars ship, the $7,500 tax credit will still be around in the U.S.A. – not for many cars, but it will still be around and definitely not “long gone.”

Because in makes no sense. Your assumptions are mostly baseless. Your solar performance numbers look way too optimistic, and 7.5kW of solar will set you back $25k installed, $15k if you do it yourself. My Fiat averages 278 w/mile, about the same as the Model 3

@Alaa:

You would learn more, and you would get a better reputation on this forum, if you’d listen to, and thank, those who take the time to correct your faulty assumptions and factual errors regarding technical matters — which are unfortunately quite frequent — instead of arguing with them.

Alaa — Unless I’m missing something, that link was to panels only. No racks, no wiring, no converter, no hardware, no labor, no tools, no permits, no shipping, no taxes, etc.

It sounds like you are on the right track, but you probably have to tighten up the math, and shy away from the assumptions.

If you want to use little Wh/miles get an eBike. Mine is around 8 Wh/mile. Far below any car and in the city you are (nearly) equal fast.

I drive 16km (~10miles) each morning and need only 5-10 minutes longer with my bike. For shorter routes the eBike only gets better.

Tesla needs to have this program available for “Alt-Right” Trumpites in Washington DC…

this is a STUPID offer. if you could afford a tesla model S, you could get a dealer to let you test drive the car. there is no need for a “contest”. the only people who would need a “contest” are people who couldn’t afford one. if you want a tesla model S, but can’t afford one, why would you torture yourself by borrowing one for a week knowing that you would have to return it. this would be about as ridiculous as if i went to a mercedes-benz dealership and borrowed a b#@z-o for a week.

. “evidently, your bentley must have said ‘rent me'” — ice cube

Like any halo car, the point of letting somebody who can’t afford an S drive an S would be to use the Model S to sell them on a future Model 3 purchase.

Sell the dream in order to close the deal on the moderately priced car lower in the model lineup.

That’s always been the formula for building exclusive Halo cars in order to drive mass market unit sales.

that’s a terrible idea. that sets them up to be disappointed with the model 3. it would be like test driving a b#@z-o only to end up buying a benz c-class.

one guy who doesn’t have to worry about such things is floyd “money” mayweather, he just dropped $3.5 million to buy a bugatti chyron:

http://www.maxim.com/rides/floyd-mayweather-buys-another-bugatti-2016-1

he had to sell one of his older bugatti’s to make room for the chyron in his garage. in addition, mayweather had already spent $4.8 million to get a Koenigsegg CCXR Trevita, one of only 3 in the world.

simply amazing…

Of course, be over 25.

I love how I’m 23 and can drive my Dad’s Tesla but since I’m not the magical “25” I cannot test drive a Tesla test car lol

Maybe you could try ringing up Koenigsegg, and seeing if they will let you borrow a One:1 for a week….

*grin*