Ignore The FUD: Tesla Was Auto Industry’s Leader In 2018

DEC 26 2018 BY EVANNEX 31

IGNORE THE FUD, TESLA WAS THE AUTO INDUSTRY’S CHAMP IN 2018

Much of this year was marked by a massive smear campaign against Elon Musk and his electric car company Tesla. FUD was at an all-time high. Ignore it. If you cut through the clutter, and instead, according to Wired, “If you focus on Tesla the company, then 2018 has been very good indeed.”

*This article comes to us courtesy of EVANNEX (which also makes aftermarket Tesla accessories). Authored by Matt Pressman. The opinions expressed in these articles are not necessarily our own at InsideEVs.

Above: Tesla’s Model 3 proved to be a game changer (Instagram: barbaratheninja)

Although Tesla won’t release official figures until the new year, Kelley Blue Book estimates the company sold about 160,000 cars (including Models S, 3, and X) through the end of November. “Last year was around 50,000, so it’s more than triple the sales,” says Kelley Blue Book analyst Tim Fleming.

The current price point puts the newest Tesla sedan in KBB’s “luxury” segment, but that hasn’t stopped people from buying the Model 3. “It will be the top-selling luxury vehicle this year,” Fleming says. That’s against all luxury vehicles, including SUVs. The next best-selling car, the Mercedes C-Class, comes in seventh. Moreover, Tesla sold 2.5 times more Model 3 vehicles than BMW sold 3 Series.

Above: Tesla outsells all other cars and SUVs in the U.S. luxury segment (Chart: Wired; Source: KBB, InsideEVs)

And how does Tesla compare with its automotive brethren on Wall Street? According to Bloomberg, “Stocks of automakers in China, France, Germany, India, Japan, South Korea and the U.S. are down as much as 36 percent… Only one of the world’s 10 most valuable car companies is setting sales records and outperforming the equity market. That would be Tesla Inc., proving that the zero-emission future works.”

“How is the rest of the industry, still overwhelmingly committed to fossil fuel, doing? Daimler AG, the parent of Mercedes, lost a third of its value. Porsche Automobil Holding SE declined 23 percent. BMW AG, which brands its product ‘the ultimate driving machine,’ made stockholders 17 percent poorer. Even Toyota Motor Corp., the global No. 1 making everything from the popular hybrid Prius to the esteemed Lexus luxury line, is down 3 percent. All of the giants, including General Motors Co., Ford Motor Co. and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles SA, reported minuscule sales growth the past five years, a major reason why they are investor also-rans,” notes Bloomberg.

Above: Tesla’s total return in 2018 outshines all other automakers on Wall Street (Source: Bloomberg)

“Tesla became No. 3 in market capitalization among the 20 largest automakers with a total return (income plus appreciation) dwarfing the few that are up on the year when the industry average was a loss of 13 percent. Tesla also produced the greatest risk-adjusted return, which is the market’s way of saying that Tesla investors received the most compensation for price fluctuations,” according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

With Tesla’s planned expansion in European and Asian markets in 2019, Forbes says, “As major automotive makers batten down hatches for the stormy financial times ahead, U.S. upstart electric carmaker Tesla Inc is set to prosper in 2019.” Jefferies analyst Philippe Houchois agrees, “Tesla is one of the few (manufacturers) likely to grow earnings in 2019-20.”

Above: Even serial Tesla bashers, like (gasp!) Fox Business News, are giving kudos to the company and its boss Elon Musk (Youtube: Fox Business)

According to Inverse, “next year’s rollout to other continents will send sales surging as more consumers get on board.” Scott Shepard, senior analyst at Navigant Research says, “The effect here should be considerable. The Model 3 roll-out in North America made it the fastest growing plug-in vehicle market in 2018.” Nevertheless, Shepard notes, “China is a big market for Tesla, but China’s market is already so big that the Tesla effect on it will not be as dramatic as in North America or Europe.”

*Editor’s Note: EVANNEX, which also sells aftermarket gear for Teslas, has kindly allowed us to share some of its content with our readers, free of charge. Our thanks go out to EVANNEX. Check out the site here.

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Source: WiredBloombergForbesInverse; Video: Fox Business

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31 Comments on "Ignore The FUD: Tesla Was Auto Industry’s Leader In 2018"

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Another Euro point of view

Worse than FUD, downright blasphemy ! That’s what it was.
/s. 🙂

Can’t wait for the oil company shills to pop in and brag about their affordable, diesel cars, for the every-man. Or, how Tesla is ruining the environment with logic stretched so thin, I feel bad for them having absolutely nothing to bolster their paid point of view.

Maybe they will get creative and write a poem.

Why is Elon laughing, you wonder? No, it isn’t another recreational faux pas; he’s on his way to the bank and keeps passing by old, white men in short-shorts. They are trying to look innocent while a Tesla owner is blaring emissions testing out their stereo, which is turned up to 11.

Another Euro point of view

Here, found an example of oil companies getting in the way of EV adoption:

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/oct/25/shell-starts-rollout-of-ultrafast-electric-car-chargers-in-europe

Oh wait !

Shell is the only one.
Exxon: ZERO.
Oh, there’s spending pennies on bio-diesel or something.

Shell is also a full member of the California Fuel Cell Partnership, which is promoting the “hydrogen economy” hoax, trying to suck up taxpayer money to waste on building hydrogen fueling stations; money which should be going to EV incentives. That is, incentives for plug-in EVs, not “fool cell” cars, which are not now — and never will be — practical EVs.

hahah.. Diesel. I can’t tell you how many times people have suggested I buy a diesel car over the last few years that I’ve been driving an EV. They just totally don’t get it at all. The closest analogy would be like asking somebody to give up their smart phone and go back to a rotary-dial telephone.

You should buy a rotary phone, they’re better. Smart phones are just a fad.

What do you do when your phone battery runs out? A rotary phone on the other hand always has power even if your electricity goes out. And with cyber-security being such a problem think about how no one can hack your rotary. Plus a smart phone doesn’t have any soul and isn’t even fun to dial. When you dial a smart phone it doesn’t make that wonderful familiar, clack-clack-clack sound. I could never give that up.

Pascal Abessolo Nguema

Depends, I have an app on my smart phone that mimic an old rotary.. 😛

Another Euro point of view
Maybe what you needed to do is ask to those people their reasons. If it was for city or short distance driving then indeed that would have been a silly idea to suggest diesel. For environmental issues as well. Diesel being the worse of the fossil fuels. Now for people traveling long distances, the specific energy of one liter of diesel is 10 kWh. if you take into consideration that a modern diesel waste about 60% of that energy in heat then we you are down to 4 kWh used to move your car. Now a diesel typically has a 50 to 65 liters thank. That’s a 200 kWh battery. Now strictly speaking you can fill that 200 kWh battery in about 5 minutes when not in a hurry. 200 kWh in 5 minutes that’s the equivalent of about 30 times the speed of a Tesla super charger (with tapering etc. real charging rate is around 80 kWh) So here you are, imagine you would have on the market an electric car which: 1/ costs EUR 25k upfront. 2/ has a 200 kWh battery 3/ charges at a rate which is 30 times faster than a Tesla If those people… Read more »

The yardstick (meterstick?) you claim people use for EVs against a diesel is more than absurd. What twisted logic would an individual have to exercise in order to expect from any EV the specifications you list?

So does that mean that EVs can never meet the fantasy requirements of diesel fans? No, because the specs you mention don’t take into account the fact that gas and diesel are destroying our environment. And these expectations don’t address the positive aspects of charging EVs at home, and never having to visit a stinky gas station.

We don’t need any EV to fulfill the diesel fantasy. VW doesn’t have to wait until consumers rearrange their expectations of how a car should perform. If you actually believe that car buyers are waiting for EVs to perform like diesels, than perhaps education is the way to inform consumers of how idiotic it is to expect EVs to have diesel range and diesel costs while also saving our environment.

Only Shell and Exxon claim that diesels have better characteristics than an EV. Because, on balance, a diesel or gas car can’t begin to compete against EVs. And that’s a fact, not fantasy.

Your math doesn’t add up at all.

The Model S will charge at a real-world rate of 150 miles of range in 30 minutes. That’s not just an unobtainable theoretical maximum; that’s what is actually achieved by real Tesla car owners in real road trips, using Supercharger stations which aren’t very busy.

The aim for ultra-fast charging, to make BEVs fully competitive with gasmobiles, would be 300 miles of range in a 10-minute charging session. (There’s no good or practical reason to try to achieve a 2-3 minute charging time. It’s unnecessary and would make both the battery pack and the charger too expensive.)

300 miles of range in 10 minutes of charge would be only 6x the current rate of charging for Tesla cars… not the 30x you claim. Charging at 6x the current* rate will probably be quite usual within less than a decade from now.

BTW — Why are you persisting in your serial Tesla bashing? “Another Euro…”, are you actually still invested in a TSLA short-selling position? If so… Well then, learning has not taken place.

*See what I did there? 😉

Charge leaf overnight twice a week 5 seconds to plug in about £8 for the week, would be cheaper on a night tarif. We fill diesel once a fortnight have to drive to petrol station, queue at petrol station, watch out for cars jumping the queue, use dirty smelly oily pump to fill up, risk thousands of pounds if we miss-fuel, go to kiosk to pay where they relieve me of £70, then drive home.
Just wondering what to do with the extra 10-20 minutes we save every week and the £27 a week we save.
By the way the diesel Is going soon.

Not only that but, they’re pushing Jeeps.
These are gas guzzlers, but also the crudest, most unreliable vehicles on the market.
The engine and transmission are Amazing noise machines.
The punishing ride. The tire noise. Amazing.

But, Jeep has a huge used car market, as people trade them in after 1-2 years.
I guess that’s a plus for US Jobs.

But now they have newfangled push-button land line phones! Much better than those rotary phones; I used to get a sore fingertip from using the rotary dial too much. 😉

Audi “Clean Diesel” driving Another Euro already did!

Another Euro point of view

I just wanted to check if you was keeping a good watch out 🙂

Lol 😂😂😂😂😂😂😂. Toyota was champ again sorry but it’s facts

Signs of Toyota bankruptcy will appear soon.

At this point of time, Toyota is very strong in both China & USA, but the rise of plugins in China could soon change the tide.
Toyota still is the leader of hybrids and they could use this to kill diesels and other gasmobiles.

Another Euro point of view

Probably Toyota’s point of view is that they know enough about car electrification that they can afford to wait a bit. IMO they are probably right as a small company as Jaguar could make a decent EV without any EV experience and the issue they have about the I-pace low efficiency is probably 70% about the bad aerodynamics and the rest probably do not require rocket science to improve considering its their first EV. I would not be surprised to soon see a refreshed version of the i-pace with an improved efficiency.

Jaguar neither designed nor builds the I-Pace. The manufacturing of Jaguar’s EV is performed by a company that has extensive experience in building EVs.

So no, an amateur can’t just decide to build EVs and do it effectively or efficiently.

Ok crazy. When someone can dethroned the reliability title and affordability tile from Toyota then we can talk

I like that Model S with black out grilled in the video tho

Tesla beat all the FUD, thanks to http://www.insideevs.com and many other green websites and its supporters.
Diesel is a big casualty this year. There will be more diesel bleeding next year as many more plugins pop up and diesel models are killed outright.

Don’t expect oil companies to give up, they will mount more attacks next year since transport fuels are their lucrative business.

Diesel is losing to Electric Generation, Ships, Bio Diesel, EV’s cars, trucks buses and soon Semi’s.
I wonder what the diesel consumption is for 2018.

Sales of Tesla is only limited by how many it can produce. The new factory in China and Germany will jump those numbers. The new model Y, Semi ,Pickup and Roadster II will just keep pouring it on. I’m not even counting the Power Wall, Pack and Mega Pack. The HyperLoop and other new items. Get you stock now like I did a few years back.

QUOTE=Although Tesla won’t release official figures until the new year, Kelley Blue Book estimates the company sold about 160,000 cars (including Models S, 3, and X) through the end of November. “Last year was around 50,000, so it’s more than triple the sales,” says Kelley Blue Book analyst Tim Fleming.

160,000 is just US sales probably over 250,000 world sales. I’m still hoping Tesla gets to 500,000 next year. It all depends on production and tariffs in China.

Tesla stock is going down but it’s short term while the rest of the market may still be going lower.
Analysts said that if Tesla doesn’t deliver it’s TM3 by 12/31/18 that Tesla will refund 1/2 the credit so customers aren’t loosing money. That shouldn’t even be a surprise of course they would do that, but how many cars will that effect. I’m guessing no more than a few hundred. Tesla wouldn’t have been announcing letting customers order more TM3’s as recently as 2 weeks ago if it couldn’t deliver. However weather is always a factor especially in the winter.

Well obviously, which company “was the auto industry’s champ in 2018” depends on what yardstick you use. If you go by year-on-year sales increase, then of course Tesla is the runaway winner! With more than triple the sales this year compared to last — let me say that again: Tesla’s 2018 sales will be more than three times what they were just last year! — then of course Tesla will be far ahead of the pack.

But by other metrics, Tesla is still a rather small company compared to market leaders such as Toyota, GM, and Volkswagen.

Using stock price is a pretty silly metric. Tesla’s stock has been overvalued for years, and with the recent turn to a “bull market”, other auto makers’ stocks are down much more than their corporate performance could justify.

Pushmi I really like your comments but I have to disagree on Tesla being over valued for years. Revenue increased by 40% this year. The things that may keep it from increasing revenues by 30-40% a year for at least 5 years are the President, recession and tariffs. Demand outstrips supply and that’s not only in EV’s but also in storage products.
Right now the President is the greatest danger to the economy.

Thanks push. I go by sales and markets and cars they reproduce