Tesla Gigafactory To Open In 2016

FEB 17 2015 BY ERIC LOVEDAY 44

Still Of Recent Tesla Gigfactory Video Progress

Still Of Recent Tesla Gigfactory Video Progress

Tesla Gigafactory Rendering

Tesla Gigafactory Rendering

Tesla is reportedly ahead of schedule on site work at the Gigafactory.

Per Nikkei:

“A battery plant that Tesla Motors is building with Panasonic in the U.S. state of Nevada will begin operations in 2016, earlier than initially planned, a Tesla official said here Friday.”

“The plant’s launch will be accelerated to bring down production costs through economies of scale, said Kurt Kelty, who oversees battery technologies at Tesla.”

If Tesla can get the Gigactory open in 2016, then there’s still an outside chance the Model 3 could launch in 2017.

Nikkei adds:

“Plans call for getting domestic and foreign parts and materials suppliers to build production facilities on the grounds. Tesla has made progress in selecting suppliers, according to Kelty.”

Source: Nikkei

Categories: Tesla

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44 Comments on "Tesla Gigafactory To Open In 2016"

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“Tesla is reportedly ahead of schedule”
—–
Has this ever been uttered before?
πŸ™‚

It may be uttered again, if M3 gets released early…

+1 I hope they prove everyone wrong. Either way…willing to wait.

Yes but only to be disproven later πŸ˜‰

Model X may have taught Elon n’ company the value of not generating their own challenges with overreaching technical designs that generate delays.

I expect M3 to be a little early– with the gigafactory coming online. Getting the base model out, is job one. πŸ˜‰

Good comment about Tesla learning to scale back the design challenges in their products. Agree.

Particularly for a more cost sensitive model.

Still a huge fan though

Will Panasonic equip it fully to begin with or will they just equip it what they can afford to in 2016, and add capacity as they roll along in 2017, 2018, etc.

I believe they will add capacity over time and not all at once.

Yes, the plan as previously announced was to reach full operating capacity in 2020. They have reportedly pushed plans forward a year, which apparently means the current plan is to reach full capacity in 2019.

It’s hard to be meaningfully ahead of schedule when only 1% of the total cost has been spent. However, if they have advanced the schedule that’s good news.

Most of the budget is on machinery not the building itself.

Where did your 1% number come from and whose 1% is it, Tesla’s. Can’t say whose money has been spent so far but likely mostly Tesla’s and pretty sure that amount is a good bit more than 1% of their stake.

I think what’s happened here is we’ve gone from the facility being ready in very early 2017, to being ready in very late 2016. So the schedule has moved up a few weeks. But like all things Tesla, it makes for a great headline, doesn’t it? “Wow, they’re a whole year ahead of schedule!” πŸ™‚

You seem quick to criticize Tesla, why?

Model S might have come out a few months later than they’d said. So what? Does that make Model S any less significant?

It seems guys like you let mega-giant companies slide when they promise some new “Tesla fighter” that will cost $250,000/unit and is years out. Or someone like GM for promising to build a 30,000 unit/yr, 200 mile AER CUV without a charging infrastructure – while something like a delay at young, tiny Tesla compels you to crank up the keyboard and criticize.

Why is that?

It’s more a criticism of the media than a criticism of Tesla. The press writes intentionally misleading headlines in order to capture attention. The Gigafactory was supposed to be operating in early 2017, so 2016 isn’t as much of a gain as it might seem at first glance.

Similarly, it’s not GM that called the Bolt a “Tesla fighter.”

A motto hangs on the wall at Nintendo’s game design studios…

“A late game is only late until it’s released. A bad game is bad forever.”

+many

and even more true for cars

With the premium, on making others wonder, it won’t be long before walls and ceiling are up. Also, if they want to panel the roof, and take advantage of the 30% ITC, that will be another pressure point for the 2016 tax year.

I don’t think they’re gonna do solar/wind at the beginning. Tesla’s capital is best used elsewhere at this point.

Once the income starts rolling in and increasing cash on hand, then it starts becoming worthwhile to shave off the electricity bills with onsite solar/wind.

Today Tesla is not in short of capital. And actually they have troubles of finding good investment opportunities. And investing on solar, wind and battery storage is certainly good enough opportunity for predictable returns of invested captal.

The battery supply is what is wreaking Tesla all most all the time so Tesla is right now fighting for it’s life right now with building the new battery factory.

What?

He’s right…

I have been noticing that when ever Tesla tries to raise car production at their main factory they never can due to the limited amount of batteries. Also Panasonic simply can’t keep up with a aeranvge Tesla needing 7000 laptop batteries to fill it up.

If a major earthquake hits Japan in the next year and shuts down all the battery factories for 20 to 40 weeks it will cripple Tesla more then we could have thought possible.

I personally think that the Giga factory will only be enough to feed the Tesla Model S and Model X at full production.

Certainly the main reason that plans have been pushed forward a year (and I don’t think “a year” means merely a few weeks) is to provide a larger and more reliable supply of battery cells for the Models S and X. But Tesla plans on building 500,000 cars per year by 2020, and I do -not- think most of those are going to be Models S and X. The Model ≑ is intended to be half the price of the “S”, and half the price should result in -much- more than twice the sales, if the Model ≑ is as compelling in its price range as the Model S is compelling in the luxury sedan price range. 500,000 per year would be sales roughly equal to the best-selling models of gas guzzler. No company, not even Tesla, is going to get sales like that with a car that has a base price of $70k and an average sales price of $95k-100k. The top 10 best-selling cars (and pickups) in the USA all have a base price between (if I recall correctly) $18k and $25k. In most other countries, the average sale price will be even lower. It’s going to be… Read more »

I like Lensman. He sounds like me lots of times.

In that, I have nearly been moved to compliment him before, but fell silent the other day when he “+5’d” one of my detractors!

πŸ™‚

Actually, my guess is it’s more a matter of rather than supply assuming pack cost will be lowered by producing the cells and packs there.

I thought they have always said it would start producing the first test cells in late 2016. Hard to tell if this is really any sooner.

At least it is not delayed already, that is a good sign.

Having suppliers build production facilities on site seems to be the optimal strategy in regards to freight costs. Also with the recent portataclysm, all along the West coast, a very good idea.

I would still like to see a full size mock-up of the Model 3 to know that a design really exists. The Model X had a known design at least a year in advance of orders/deposits being received.

” getting domestic and foreign parts and materials suppliers to build production facilities on the grounds ” is the real news here.
This makes for tight quality control and design changes to be nimble and quick;
Way to go!

Very important for Tesla.

As Japan is sometimes plagued by severe earthquakes, it is absolutely necessary to produce batteries in a different region. Now, only one earthquake can literally stop the complete production for several months.

Don’t forget that Fremont is in an earthquake zone also.

Even if, as someone speculated above, this is really nothing more than moving up the date a few weeks from early 2017 to late 2016, I’m glad to see it. The rEVolution is taking far too bloody long, so the sooner battery prices drop and Tesla forces the hands of at least some of the traditional car companies, the better.

As I keep saying, who here thinks the current crop of EVs will look like anything but antiques in just 2 or 3 years? Pick any EV, write down the major specs and the price, and then try to imagine any car company selling that package around mid-2017. It’s a value proposition that would stink like wet garbage on a hot day.

It’s also just as important for it’s own sake. The Gigafactory will force the hand of other battery manufacturers to become cost competitive. An industry driven by cost competition mixed with continuing innovation is a very strong force for making technology very accessible. For example, combined with Solarcity taking the same approach with its own PV Gigafactory, this brings very affordable power generation into the home. This will shock the utility industry and excelerate the decommissioning of coal plants.

Also, I agree about your antique comment, but only in the case of two purpose built EVs – the Leaf and BMW i3. Otherwise, most EVs are retrofits of already best selling cars like the Ford Focus and VW Golf, and Teslas specifically will become timeless collector cars since Tesla continually offers upgrades to keep them relevant, even for the small production Roadster.

CherylG's_DirtyLittleSecret

I for-see a new battery cell form factor in the future….

GO TESLA GO

is it me or am i a geek i am wanting to see more and more photos am hucked on this mega/ giga factory .
i would buy a tickes to go to see the factory mm
i am from leeds england ..

It’s not just you. Large scale construction projects are always impressive. PBS ran a documentary mini-series, “Skyscraper”, that followed the construction of just one building in Manhattan (New York) from start to finish.

Something smells fishy in Reno. I’ve followed everything Elon Musk has accomplished so far and have been very supportive of his ideas and goals.
Having said that, I also spent over 30 years as an electrician, building infrastructure and industrial facilities all over the nation. Even though I’m retired I still keep up with industrial construction manpower needs.
IBEW local 401 of Reno, Nv. will be supplying all the electrical manpower needs for that project.
Thus far, they have only had a few men out there working on temporary power. So far Tesla has only let about 20% of the electrical contract saying they may spread construction of the rest of the plant out over 6 or more years.
What’s happening on the ground seems a far cry from the hype we are being fed.
Remember, you read it here first! πŸ˜€

Something smells fishy in Reno. I’ve followed everything Elon Musk has accomplished so far and have been very supportive of his ideas and goals.
Having said that, I also spent over 30 years as an electrician, building infrastructure and industrial facilities all over the nation. Even though I’m retired I still keep up with industrial construction manpower needs.
IBEW local 401 of Reno, Nv. will be supplying all the electrical manpower needs for that project.
Thus far, they have only had a few men out there working on temporary power. So far Tesla has only let about 20% of the electrical contract saying they may spread construction of the rest of the plant out over 6 or more years.
What’s happening on the ground seems a far cry from the hype we are being fed.
Remember, you read it here first! πŸ˜€