Tesla’s Network Of Destination Chargers Now Over 5,000 Sites

6 months ago by Steven Loveday 4

Tesla

Tesla Destination Charger

Tesla continues to expand its Destination Charging network, entering nine new countries since January 2017, now including over 1,000 new chargers globally.

We often hear about the Supercharger network, due to its exclusivity, along with the ability for Tesla drivers to charge quickly while traveling. But, the electric automaker is also working briskly to expand its Destination Charging network.

While Destination Chargers aren’t as useful to give you that fast boost of juice in the midst of a road trip, they can prove just as useful to Tesla drivers that are stopping for a length of time at a restaurant or shopping center, or stopping overnight at a hotel or resort.

Destination Chargers are AC level 2 chargers, not to be confused with the automaker’s infamous DC fast Superchargers, which enable quick charging.

Tesla continues to push its customers to use the Superchargers for their intended purpose, so that the stations don’t suffer overcrowding. In order to better facilitate this, the Silicon Valley automaker is aggressively expanding the Destination Charging network, so that people can plan their trips accordingly, and make use of both charging options.

Superchargers utilize DC fast charging technology, while the Destination Chargers are merely traditional level 2 Tesla Wall Connectors, like you could install in your home.

To push the program forward, Tesla offers restaurants, hotels, shopping centers, resorts, and other similar establishments two free Destination Chargers. The only stipulation is that the chargers must be installed in visible and convenient locations. The businesses can also choose to add additional chargers at their discretion, at a cost. Of course, the businesses will have to foot the energy bill related to the charger use.

The automaker agrees to assure that the business name is provided to its customers, so that Tesla drivers may choose to do business in the participating locations. For example, if a Tesla driver is booking a hotel, he/she may opt for one with a Destination Charger, rather than the location next door that doesn’t offer the service. Hopefully, this will persuade the “next door” location to jump on the bandwagon.

Reddit poster Arxcis has been tracking the automaker’s Destination Charging network, and posts this information on Reddit, in the form of an easy-to-read spreadsheet. The largest expansion shown is that of Europe. As we have continually reported, when Tesla has entered each new country, such as the more recent efforts in Portugal, UAE, and New Zealand, Destination Chargers have been included as part of the process.

Tesla

Arxcis’ most current Reddit post tracking Destination Chargers

According to CEO Elon Musk, the Supercharger network is supposed to double by the end of the year, and the Destination Charger network will quadruple. This puts worldwide year-end estimates at 7,000 and 15,000, respectively. Currently, Tesla has over 5,000 Superchargers and over 10,000 Destination chargers globally.

Source: Reddit

Tags: , , , ,

4 responses to "Tesla’s Network Of Destination Chargers Now Over 5,000 Sites"

  1. guyinacar says:

    Almost right.

    Why ever would “the location next door” install a destination charger when the fools next door are providing one for free? This was an Achilles’ Heel of the recent Connecticut EV subsidy program. If you were a property owner, let’s say Marriott, then your guests could just walk next door to the Hilton and use Hilton’s EVSE for free. In CT, commercial recipients of the subsidy had to “Commit to maintaining and operating the EV charging station(s) as publicly-accessible units,” pay for the electricity, do any maintenance, shoulder the insurance and snow removal costs, and agree that the State of CT could publish the unit’s location for years. In other words, the Hilton “committed” to the subsidy of Marriott customers. Stupid.

    Unsurprisingly, EVSE adoption was glacial. Good luck finding one of those in working order today. Smart property owners “accidentally” broke them.

    No, what’s really required here is a proliferation of small, and just slightly profitable destination chargers, so there’s a market. Tesla is 100% right about the charging rate: nobody wants to unplug at 3am, and generally they won’t. The car just sits on the spot until after checkout and breakfast. So L2 is fine. Better to have 8 spots at L2 than one spot doing DCFC.

    As usual, Tesla is wrong about its proprietary “Betamax” connector, though. Hotel and airport L2 EVSEs should be the J1772 standard, which Teslas can also use. Indeed, airports should perhaps be L1 EVSEs with J1772 standard connectors, but in even greater numbers. Better to trickle charge a thousand cars for a week, etc.

    1. randomhuman says:

      Why J1772 standard? Level 2 Mennekes connector is the way to go.

  2. Bill Howland says:

    Does anyone know of any of the HPWC’s hooked up on 277 volts in lieu of 200-240 volts?

    I thought all ‘destination’ charger locations also had to have at least 1 Clipper Creek wall box for the non-tesla drivers.

  3. My comment very simply is that when I get my Tesla Model 3 coming soon anytime now I also plan to purchase my own Tesla charger okay for an additional $850 okay I think it is worth it and of course it makes sense does it not especially since you will be able to charge your car at any time that suits you okay and you can do it at your own convenience at home okay yes no need to look for a Tesla charging station thank you I rest my case