Tesla Cheers Up Sick Kids With Rides In Model S – Video

APR 14 2015 BY ELECTRICCARSTV 14

Don’t we all have a soft spot for sick kids?

In mid-March, Tesla Motors teamed up with Dream Drives For Kids to offer sick kids a ride in the Model S at the Portland International Raceway.

This video is from those drives.

Via Oregon Live, here’s a summary of the events:

Buckled up in their carseats, two 3-year-old twin brothers counted down to acceleration inside a Tesla Model S.

Benjamin starts the countdown from five and his brother Zevi repeats after him.

As soon as Benjamin says “Go!” driver Eric Peterson slams on the accelerator and they’re off, speeding up to 110 miles per hour on the Portland International Raceway.

One trip around the track and the boys are ready for a second lap.

“What my wife, my family and our friends are trying to do with Dream Drives for Kids is create that kind of joy,” said Peterson.

Peterson owns exotic cars and after speaking with a friend who is an employee at Doernbecher’s Children Hospital, he came up with the idea for this organization, giving sick children access to Ferraris, Lamborghinis and Porsches.

“To get out of the hospitals, get away from medicines, get off of chemotherapy and just come and smile and laugh and all the things that these cars enable us to do.”

Tesla’s involvement is as follows:

“The experience was part of an individual ride given by the Petersons and Dream Drives for Kids. Through a partnership with Tesla Motors, the California-based electric car company hosted a day on the Portland International Raceway bringing along a fleet of Tesla Model S sedans for nearly 25 area patients.”

And guess what? This is just the start of Dream Drives for Kids, which will now tour the country seeking children in “need of some accelerated healing,” says Oregon Live.

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14 Comments on "Tesla Cheers Up Sick Kids With Rides In Model S – Video"

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God, we all know how the P85D accelerates by now. Could we drop the bandwagon already? It’s being done to death. Let’s actually move on to some NEW news for a change.

I dunno… I find it refreshing that there are cases where INSANE speed doesn’t always kill– but ironically helps other human beings feel better by taking their minds off themselves and their illness, for a little bit.

Many sick kids are highly sensitive to the emissions of gasoline vehicles, so using an electric car for this purpose, is brilliant.

Glad to see Tesla using its technology while advertising awareness for the brand, by performing charity support for some of the most vulnerable people in our communities.

Much Karma.

Well said Anon!

Not to be a Debbie Downer, but were all of the kids at least 8 years old? Don’t child seatbelt laws require them to be 8 years old and over 4’9″ to use an adult seatbelt?

They are not on public roads

Hats off to Dream Drives for Kids!

Oh, don’t worry… Let me outdo your Debbie Downer post with a reply:

Most of these kids will likely die of their illness, or malnutrition as a secondary effect of their illness– long before they have a change to die in a supervised Tesla Driving Demo.

There, feel better now? 😉

Actually success against childhood leukemia has been excellent for the most part.

Yeah, they are not on a public road so they won’t get a ticket, but the small children might get seriously injured (ie parapeligic/quadrapeligic) because a seat belt designed for an adult might fail to protect a small/short or young child in a high-speed crash.

These children should also be wearing helmets if they’re going 110 mph. Crashes at that speed can and do happen all the time on speedtracks.

A guy died just this past week at the Exotic Driving Experience at the Walt Disney Speedway in Florida. He was an instructor sitting in the passenger seat of a Lamborghini, and was wearing a helmet and seat belts. The estimated speed of the crash was 100 mph, 10 mph slower than the Tesla driver in the story above.

These sorts of accidents and deaths are not uncommon when people (non-profession race car drivers) drive passenger cars on speedways at speeds over 100 mph. Last week’s Disney Speedway death was at least the 3rd death in the past year at U.S. speedways that allow customers to get behind the wheel of a fast car.

http://www.cnn.com/2015/04/13/us/florida-disney-driving-experience-death/

http://www.baynews9.com/content/news/baynews9/news/article.html/content/news/articles/bn9/2015/4/14/disney_speedway_deat.html

I think that Tesla should send a P85D to every children’s hospital for the a day once a quarter to help put a smile on these kids that did not smile for months. It is such a small cost for Tesla and a huge reward to see these sick kids at least smile. I hope Elone gets to read this.

Two posts out of the six posted so far are actually -negative- about a program to enable sick kids to have fun?

What is -wrong- with you people?!?!?!

It’s great to see people are taking the time and trouble to help out those in need. “Pay it forward”; we need more Good Samaritans!

Did you miss the part where it said the Tesla reaches speeds of 110 mph? Tires blow out, tie rods snap, drivers lose control. What do you think will happen in a crash at that speed to the small children with no booster seats and improperly fitted seat belts? The answer is Seat Belt Syndrome injuries. Read the link below, then Google “seat belt syndrome” and click the “images” link. Warning, it’s graphic. http://saferide4kids.com/seat-belt-syndrome/ http://thecarseatlady.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/sketch2011-04-0412_47_052.png The small children in the front seat of the Tesla have the shoulder belt wrapped over their NECKS instead of their chests. In a high-speed crash a shoulder belt around a child’s neck can break their neck rendering them a quadriplegic, or if the child’s head slips past the seat belt they will jack knife and the lap belt can severe their spine rendering them a paraplegic (not to mention the jack-knifed child’s head coming into close proximity of a deploying front air bag, hitting them full force). The above are reasons why on public roads small children are required to use booster seats after they outgrow child seats, but before they reach adult size. Those reasons also apply on race tracks, especially when going… Read more »

Here is an example of someone you jack knifed while wearing a lap seat belt and was paralyzed from the waist down. This accident was just a 30 mph crash.

http://www.latimes.com/business/autos/la-fi-hy-toyota-chelsie-hill-award-20141021-story.html

Yeah…good Simpson family scenario, Homer Simpson as the driver.

Let me say something that will cheer everyone up….that chic is hot.