Tesla Asks NHTSA For Extension Regarding Fatal Autopilot Crash Data

SEP 1 2016 BY STEVEN LOVEDAY 10

Scene Of May 7th Tesla Model S Fatality (via ABC News/Bobby Vankavelaar)

Scene Of May 7th Tesla Model S Fatality (via ABC News/Bobby Vankavelaar)

Back in May, a Tesla Model S, with Autopilot activated, crashed into a semi-truck with devastating results. The driver, Joshua Brown, 40-year-old resident of Canton, Ohio, was killed as a result of the crash. Crash reports provide that the semi-truck driver slowed to make a left turn and that the Tesla Model S Autopilot software failed to detect the trailer, driving into and under the trailer. It was reported as the first known, fatal Tesla Autopilot crash.

Joshua Brown, victim of the fatal crash, posted multiple YouTube videos showing off the Autopilot technology

Joshua Brown, victim of the fatal crash, posted multiple YouTube videos showing off the Autopilot technology

A Tesla blog post following the incident explained:

The Autopilot system failed to see “the white side of the tractor trailer against a brightly lit sky, so the brake was not applied.”

The Florida Highway Patrol and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) initiated investigations. Two months later, the NHTSA mandated that Tesla would provide data related to the crash, by August 26.

Tesla missed the deadline and requested a one-week extension from the NHTSA. The organization allowed the extension and should have the data this week. The data is to include reports on any defects that Tesla is aware of, related to the Automatic Braking and Collision Warning features. Also, Tesla will provide information pertaining to what tests of the systems were performed, and future plans for fixing any known problems. The investigation has no deadline at this point.

Tesla maintains that it responded promptly to the initial information request and only applied for the extension when the NHTSA added the additional request. Due to the lack of new information, both organizations are at a standstill.

Source: Business Insider

Categories: Crashed EVs, Tesla

Tags: ,

Leave a Reply

10 Comments on "Tesla Asks NHTSA For Extension Regarding Fatal Autopilot Crash Data"

newest oldest most voted

Go Tesla Go…continue to fight for humanity

LOL – fighting for humanity is not exactly what AutoPilot is about *)-

Don’t spoil his moment of feeling good.

The delay is a bit puzzling; all of this data is in electronic format, after all. Is it better to be late than to ship all known data on time, and then add any overlooked data later? Could one be fined for accidental omission? Perhaps they are creating new data in response to this request–summary reports, future plans, etc. That seems most likely.

“Also, Tesla will provide … and future plans for fixing any known problems”

It’s hard to say how you’ll fix something until you’ve found a solution.

Re: “…and only applied for the extension when the NHTSA added the additional request.”

I don’t think you just copy some files to a flash drive willy nilly when dealing with the NHTSA. I think you need to double and triple check that you are providing them everything they old and additional request ask for.

Four Electrics asked:

“The delay is a bit puzzling; all of this data is in electronic format, after all. Is it better to be late than to ship all known data on time, and then add any overlooked data later?”

I of course have no inside knowledge of what’s going on, or the reason for the delay. But speaking as a computer programmer, I doubt that giving the NHTSA a raw data dump would be of any use to them. The data needs to be properly interpreted and put into context, before anyone can understand what it means or what it implies.

It’s the same in intelligence (spying) work. The problem isn’t gathering data; the problem is sifting through the data to glean what’s important, and recognizing what’s important when you see it.

The other site claims that Tesla stated, the cause of the delay is due to the NHTSA making an additional modification to their original request …. sounds fair to me.

Oddly enough, cmu just released a study stating that ” autonomous driving is nowhere near ready”.
Criminal negligence?

maybe tesla is delaying so they can release the .8 upgrade coming in a few weeks?