Teen Driver Technology Coming For Chevrolet Bolt, Volt

SEP 6 2016 BY ERIC LOVEDAY 25

Chevrolet Volt

Chevrolet Volt

Chevrolet has announced that both the Bolt EV and Volt will receive the automaker’s Teen Driver technology.

What’s Teen Driver technology? Here’s how Chevrolet defines it:

Chevrolet’s Teen Driver Technology can remind them to buckle up and avoid speeding, while our other available active safety features can help to alert them in certain situations when they’re making less-than-perfect driving decisions.”

Teen Driver supports certain safe driving practices by muting the radio or the audio of any paired device when front seat occupants aren’t wearing their safety belts. It also gives audible and visual warnings when the vehicle is traveling faster than preset speeds, and allows parents to limit the maximum volume of the radio.

Additionally, available active safety features are automatically enabled and incapable of being manually disabled when Teen Driver is in use. These features may include:

Lane Departure Warning
Lane Keep Assist
Front and Rear Park Assist
Side Blind Zone Alert
Rear Cross Traffic Alert
Forward Collision Alert
Forward Automatic Braking
Rear Automatic Braking
Front Pedestrian Braking
Stability Control
Traction Control
Daytime Running Lamps/Automatic Light Control

Why the focus on teen drivers? Well, as it turns out, a Harris Poll found that “55 percent of parents with teens worry about driving, compared with 52 percent who worry about drugs and alcohol and 53 percent who worry about grades,” according to Edmunds.

Teen Driver technology is available on 10 of Chevrolet’s 2017 cars and truck, including the Bolt and Volt.

Press blast below:

TEEN DRIVING, NOT SEX, DRUGS OR ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE, TOPS PARENTS’ LIST OF CONCERNS
10 Chevys now offer technology to help parents with biggest worry

DETROIT – In the month of August this year more than 360,000 teens will become eligible for a restricted driver’s license in most states – and with that, a lot of parents will experience new levels of stress.

According to a Harris Poll survey commissioned by Chevrolet, more parents with teens worry about their child driving (55 percent) more than any other area of parental stress, including drugs and alcohol (52 percent), sexual activity (49 percent) and academic performance (53 percent).

Chevrolet recognizes this top concern for parents and, as a result, in addition to its suite of available active and passive safety features, offers Teen Driver Technology on 10 of its 2017 cars, trucks and SUVs. Chevrolet’s Teen Driver includes an industry-first in-vehicle report card that shows how the teen drove and provides a way for parents to discuss best practices.

“I, like many of our employees, am a parent of teenagers, so we personally understand the anxiety of having a teen driver in the house,” said Steve Majoros, director of marketing, Chevrolet Cars and Crossovers. “And while we can’t control a teen’s behavior when they are in a car without a parent, Chevrolet’s Teen Driver Technology can remind them to buckle up and avoid speeding, while our other available active safety features can help to alert them in certain situations when they’re making less-than-perfect driving decisions.”

Teen Driver supports certain safe driving practices by muting the radio or the audio of any paired device when front seat occupants aren’t wearing their safety belts. It also gives audible and visual warnings when the vehicle is traveling faster than preset speeds, and allows parents to limit the maximum volume of the radio.

Additionally, available active safety features are automatically enabled and incapable of being manually disabled when Teen Driver is in use. These features may include:

Lane Departure Warning
Lane Keep Assist
Front and Rear Park Assist
Side Blind Zone Alert
Rear Cross Traffic Alert
Forward Collision Alert
Forward Automatic Braking
Rear Automatic Braking
Front Pedestrian Braking
Stability Control
Traction Control
Daytime Running Lamps/Automatic Light Control
“As a mother of two, it’s extremely important to find solutions that can help young drivers on the road,” said MaryAnn Beebe, Chevrolet safety engineer. “Chevrolet developed this system as a tool that can give teens some additional coaching as they’re gaining experience. Driving on your own is a big milestone for teens, and Teen Driver helps to remind them to practice safe driving. And for parents, it’s easier to give guidance to your teen when you have some information on what they’re doing behind the wheel.”

The Teen Driver in-vehicle report card may keep track of the following, depending on the vehicle:

Distance driven
Maximum speed reached
Overspeed warnings issued
Stability control events
Antilock braking events
Traction control activations
Wide-open throttle events
Forward Collision Alerts, if equipped
Forward Collision Braking events, if equipped
Tailgating Alerts, if equipped
Teen Driver is a non-subscription-based service that remains with the vehicle permanently and is available on the 2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV, Camaro, Colorado, Cruze, Malibu, Silverado, Silverado HD, Suburban, Tahoe and Volt. To use the safety technology, a parent must register their teen’s key fob in the vehicle’s system settings.

New for most 2017 models with Teen Driver:

Maximum speed limiter
Configurable audio volume limit
Additional report card information:
Traction control activations
Wide-open throttle events
Tailgating alerts, if equipped
Each of the 10 vehicles also features available Apple CarPlay or Android Auto compatibility, to help encourage teens to refrain from using their handheld phones while driving.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed that August was the most popular birth month in the U.S. in the year 2000, with 360,080 births. Knowing there could be a record number of 16-year-olds hitting the road in August 2016, Chevrolet commissioned a survey of parents with teenagers from ages 13 to 17 years to find out how seriously parents take the issue of their teens driving. To learn more, visit http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/statab/t001x16.pdf.

Survey Methodology

This survey was conducted online within the U.S. by Harris Poll on behalf of Chevrolet from June 16-23, 2016 among 638 parents/legal guardians of a child between 13 to 17 years old. This online survey is not based on a probability sample and therefore no estimate of theoretical sampling error can be calculated. For complete survey methodology, including weighting variables, please contact Darri’n Hardy at darrin.hardy@chevrolet.com.

About Chevrolet

Founded in 1911 in Detroit, Chevrolet is now one of the world’s largest car brands, doing business in more than 115 countries and selling around 4.0 million cars and trucks a year. Chevrolet provides customers with fuel-efficient vehicles that feature engaging performance, design that makes the heart beat, passive and active safety features and easy-to-use technology, all at a value. More information on Chevrolet models can be found at www.chevrolet.com.

Source: Edmunds, General Motors

Categories: Chevrolet

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25 Comments on "Teen Driver Technology Coming For Chevrolet Bolt, Volt"

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How does it know that a teen is driving?

Pls tell me the car will not talking to me every time I go 20 over ….

What is the reason for ever driving 20 over the speed limit – other than to intentionally get pulled over for a speeding ticket or reckless driving violation?

I would suggest they take it further – teen driving mode should not allow the car to be driven over the speed limit. For all other drivers, should not be allowed to exceed 5 over the speed limit. EVER!

I don’t care how you and where you drive.

Back to my question, how does this wonderful teen system know who is behind the wheel?

The way everyone’s system does, by the key. The driver is given a key and the limits are placed on the key.

“What is the reason for ever driving 20 over the speed limit – other than to intentionally get pulled over for a speeding ticket or reckless driving violation?”

Obviously, you don’t drive in a ‘fly over’ State.

Wha?

Your question reminds me of the “deer crossing lady”.

Priceless!

I love the stunned silence.

This is completely silly.

The solution is obvious: Put a pushbutton walk signal for the deer to cross with!

Sheez

Well for starters they could place the signs facing the woods not the oncoming traffic. It’s probably hard for the deer to read them, especially at night.

Wow… just wow…

great share, Kdawg.

At our house in the suburbs, we used to have deer come regularly to our front yard to eat acorns dropped from a huge oak tree… at 3 AM.

Now, how are the deer supposed to see the sign at 3 AM? I ask you.

They really need to light up those signs at night so the deer can see where they’re supposed to cross.

Please don’t drive anywhere near me or my kids

How does the car tell the age of the driver?

“Please answer the following question:

Hitler was:

1. A republican candidate for president.

2. Chancellor of Germany.

3. A 1960’s rap star.

Gotta be 1.

Kudos for doing something but it may just give a false sense of security…Specific driving behaviors aren’t the top concern…#1 is texting while driving #2 is seatbelts and #3 is impaired driving…

I’ll only comment on #1 which is, CarPlay does nothing for texting that a modern cell phone can’t…iPhones/Droids already can read and send texts using your voice and thus is the problem…Most people are not okay with having their personal texts heard by their peers…You also have to turn down the radio volume which brings an additional layer of annoyance to passengers who may put pressure on them to keep the tunes going…

Furthermore multiple studies have been done that concluded that texting (including using your voice) and even just talking on your phone hands-free still is a distraction. The better autonomous driving gets the more distracting things drivers will do…

“Kudos for doing something but it may just give a false sense of security…Specific driving behaviors aren’t the top concern…#1 is texting while driving #2 is seatbelts and #3 is impaired driving…”

All of these will activate an erratic driver alert in the system. Such as, following too close, lane departure, automated braking, etc.

Autonomous driving doesn’t “get better”. It is either autonomous or not. What we current have is definitely NOT autonomous.

Loboc said:

“Autonomous driving doesn’t ‘get better’.”

I’m pretty sure those who are working on Google’s self-driving car project would disagree. Some of their newer cars don’t even have a steering wheel, but Google is still working hard on improvements to the system.

“The better autonomous driving gets the more distracting things drivers will do…”

The better autonomous driving gets, the less it will matter how much attention the human driver is giving to the road.

Since it seems unlikely people will stop using their phones while driving (hands-free or not), we should all hope fully self-driving cars will arrive ASAP. Sadly, it will take 15-20 years before cars not equipped for that become rare on the roads.

I’m surprised by the omission of a few obvious features:
1) Lower speed limit (like valet mode, just not as low);

2) Geofencing (all these cars have a built-in GPS, after all). if the car goes outside a pre-defined area or, send an alert to the parents;

3) Limit on total miles traveled during the outing (if the kid is going to visit a movie theater 5 miles away, total miles shouldn’t be >20) .

1: So, a teen shouldn’t be allowed to drive at normal speed on freeways? Or did you just mean that maximum speed should be limited to the highest speed limit of any in the area?

3: So if they exceed a preset range limit, should the car just shut down? Leaving the teen(s) stranded somewhere is not likely to be safe. Sending a text alert to the parents may be a good idea, though.

GM really doesn’t want teens (or anyone else) driving…

Speaking of deer, this is a serious PSA, but I couldn’t stop cracking up when I saw it:

Trending on social media five minutes after this car goes on sale:

#BoltParentalHack

Don’t worry, Volt and Bolt EV owners. GM will push the teen driver update over-the-air shortly… oh, wait.

1) A seat belt fastened in every occupied seat should not just be required to un-mute the radio. It should be required to shift out of park.
2) Cars with built-in nav systems are generally aware of speed limits on each road (not perfect, I know). The car should use that information to dynamically set the top speed to prevent excessive speeding.