Report: What German New And Used Car Buyers Think Of EVs

2 years ago by Jay Cole 18

New DAT Survey Shows Increased Consideration Of Plug-In Cars In Germany (via Dat.de)

New DAT Survey Shows Increased Consideration Of Plug-In Cars In Germany (via Dat.de)

Plug-in electric car registrations in Germany – Through February 2016 (click to enlarge)

Plug-in electric car registrations in Germany – Through February 2016 (click to enlarge)

The Dat Group (or Deutsche Automobil Treuhand GmbH if you will) has put out its 43rd annual report on the behavior of new and used car buyer in Germany.

Thankfully this year the outfit has translated that survey in English…and also expanded the results to give more prospective on German car buyers (both new and used) opinion on plug-in vehicles.

Do they know what they are?  Do they care?  Will they buy them?

If interested, we encourgage anyone to check out the entire report (and a lot more information) here. Below find some of the highlights via infographic form:

If Conventional Passenger Vehicles Did Not Exist (Data via DAT.de)

If Conventional Passenger Vehicles Did Not Exist (Data via DAT.de)

New And Used Car Buyer Awareness (via DAT.de)

New And Used Car Buyer Awareness (via DAT.de)

Environmental Awareness (via DAT.de)

Environmental Awareness (via DAT.de)

 

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18 responses to "Report: What German New And Used Car Buyers Think Of EVs"

  1. Speculawyer says:

    Conventional hybrids are not “alternative fuel vehicles”. The ONLY fuel they consume is gasoline diesel. :-/

    1. przemo_li says:

      Traditional hybrids have electric engines, where power is not generated by burning fuel by regen breaking.

      1. Dan says:

        It’s still from burning fuel.

        Fuel energy was used to generate momentum, which is recaptured by regen braking and used by the electric motor.

        Unless there is a plug, all the energy is coming from fossil fuels.

      2. Brian says:

        Regenerative breaking only recaptures energy, it does not creating any new energy. Where do you think that energy came from in the first place? Gasoline or diesel, of course!

        I too take offense at calling a non-plug-in hybrid an “alternative”. Similarly with diesel; the fuel still comes from petroleum, what’s the alternative in that?

    2. wavelet says:

      You’re misunderstanding the report. The term they’re talking about (and posed in the survey) was “alternative drivetrain”, NOT “alternative fuel”. Conventional hybrids would still count as alternative drivetrains.

      (I just downloaded & read the German original, to make sure).

  2. Scott says:

    These bracketed vehicle categories are pretty meaningless with the existing models. You can’t really draw any conclusions on “drive types” when there’s only one or two models in that category.

  3. kosee says:

    The positive one from this is the used car buyers who seem just as interested in a BEV as in a hybrid with no plug.

    1. Speculawyer says:

      Yeah, that is definitely a good way to put a positive spin on it.

  4. notting says:

    One little story from Germany:
    My parents have a very good usage profile for a BEV:
    – Very many short distances to drive.
    – Driving range ca. 50km (in the meaning of they need a vehicle with an range of 2*50km + xkm).
    – Already Renault drivers for decades (brand with most kinds of BEV in our area).
    – Clio-like vehicle is ok.
    – Could charge at home (home owners), would even put thicker cables and a wallbox there.

    Why I didn’t suggest a Zoe:
    – Entry looks to low.
    – No adjustable drivers seat.
    – Battery is expensive (just for rent, not to buy).
    – Vehicle to expensive (before the 5k Renault discount was there).
    – Don’t want an “automatic gearbox”.

    Ok, the last one is a general problem. But the rest is just stupid made by Renault. So they bought a Captur TCe 90 (Clio-SUV)…

    notting

    1. przemo_li says:

      The what???

      You actually want You parents to deal with “gearbox” ???

      Never heard about those cars You sell as soon as your mechanic look at it with THAT look?

      😉

    2. Markus says:

      Sadly you made a big mistake. You missed to let your parents test-drive the ZOE. If your parents would have driven the ZOE, they would have gone for it. Preheating, easy up-hill-start, very silent, good for your children. If they have Solar-Panels on the roof, its also poor maths in the decision.

    3. turboro says:

      All wrong arguments!
      – Entry is higher than Clio
      – Driver seat can be adjusted
      – Low charge price compensate for battery rent
      – Dealer gives high discount on Zoe
      – Drive automatic before judge

      It’s clear that you and your parents never really looked and went for a drive.
      Maybe next their next car will be a Zoe 🙂

      1. notting says:

        “All wrong arguments!
        – Entry is higher than Clio”

        Your argument is wrong because the Clio was never an option. And I’m absolutely sure the entry of the Captur I mentioned at the end is higher then the one of the Zoe.

        “– Driver seat can be adjusted”

        Sorry, I forgot the word “height” in that context. You won’t find it in the Zoe price list (like at my Megane they mentioned it).

        “– Low charge price compensate for battery rent
        – Dealer gives high discount on Zoe”

        No arguments if you’ll have problems driving the car (reasons see above).

        “– Drive automatic before judge”

        Don’t tell me, would also have prefered the TCe with more power. But I’m really afraid that my parents will push the “clutch pedal” very hard from time to time…

        notting

  5. BraveLilToaster says:

    So, 70% of the respondents have heard of electric cars, and less than 5% give two shits about buying them.

    Well, at least the problem isn’t “lack of advertising” or flat-out ignorance.

    1. Djoni says:

      Yep, just between 9 and 10% would pay more to save on gas or to put less Co² in the atmosphere.
      Witch translate to the percentage of people that are ready to do something for mankind.(Or pretend they would)
      Not much, not enough.
      Don’t know how to fix that.

      1. V2 says:

        Not sure what you mean by “just between 9 and 10% would pay more to save on gas or to put less Co² in the atmosphere”?

        The survey gives the numbers for people answering positively to the questions as 71%/61% and 50%/42% respectively for new/used car buyers.

        Wonder what would have been the answer to a question to the effect of “If you want to save on gas and CO2 emissions but do not want to buy electrified car, what would you rather have?”

        1. Djoni says:

          Sorry, my mistake. I thought that it applied only to the 22% new buyers and 14% uses ones that would consider buying alternative fuel car.
          But in fact it’s for all car buyers and the proper number are those you mention 71%/61% and 50%/42% respectively for new/used car buyers.
          Still your last question is interesting.

  6. ModernMarvelFan says:

    If you combine EREV and PHEV together (similar), the amount of interest is higher than either BEV or non-plugin hybrid for used car buyers…

    It is also higher than BEV for new buyers as well.

    So, PHEV (including EREV) is actually a very valid first step.