Scania To Supply 15 PHEV Trucks For German E-Highways Trial

DEC 9 2018 BY MARK KANE 11

Hybrid trucks with plug-in capability

Scania announced that in May 2019 it will supply 15 R 450 hybrid trucks for the German eHighway trials. The trucks will be equipped with special pantograph power collectors, developed by Siemens, so they can drive electric on roads with an overhead catenary system.

So far, several trials like this were conducted around the world with subsidies, but so far no one decided to invest in commercial operation, which suggests that battery-electric trucks are seen as a better solution.

Three places will be electrified:

  • A5 Autobahn in Hessen, where the five-kilometre e-highway infrastructure with electric power supplied from overhead lines in both directions has been completed
  • A1 Autobahn to the Port of Lübeck, with additional stationary charging capacity planned at the port (summer 2019)
  • in Baden-Württemberg along a section of the B462 federal road (early 2020)

“The 15 trucks will be equipped with pantograph power collectors, developed by Siemens, mounted on the frame behind the cab for charging while in motion. These trucks will be operated by haulage companies in actual transport operations. Delivery of the first hybrid R 450 truck by Scania for Hessen is scheduled for May 2019. In addition to delivering trucks, Scania will manage vehicle maintenance and data collection from the trials.

Scania has previously been selected as partner in the concurrent research project conducted by Volkswagen Group Research. A hybrid Scania R 450 is expected to be delivered to the project in February and commissioning is ongoing on Siemens test track outside Berlin. A second electrified research vehicle will be delivered in autumn 2019. The research programme will seek to analyse and optimise the powertrain concept, energy management, hybrid transmission, battery ageing and the next-generation cooling system.”

Magnus Höglund, Head of Electric Road System, Scania said:

“Unlike passenger cars, which remain parked and stationary most of the day, trucks are deployed for long hours in transport assignments when stopping to charge can be highly disruptive in the operations. E-highways offer rational and effective charging en route. The solution also saves batteries and reduces load on the energy network,”.

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11 Comments on "Scania To Supply 15 PHEV Trucks For German E-Highways Trial"

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This is not designed to be used everywhere. It is for areas where they can replace normal trucks for a set distance. They only need a small battery, and the price is cheap ( relatively). From a port to a storage area for example.

The first trucks used to try these e-highways were re-built mild hybrids. Imagine how easy it would be to convert a fleet when all you need is some kind of hybdrid (or all electric) drive-train on the car to fiarly easily use this system.

Put these on some of the major highways and watch the conversion process begin…

More likely, the electrification will be done for the highway portion of the truck route and the small battery and engine take over for the last mile. This minimizes the amount of electrification required. InsideEVs seems more obsessed with maximizing giant battery deployment these days than highlighting the kinds of prudent technology options that give the most benefits for the least investment of resources.

Maximizing use of limited resources supports putting battery packs in BEVs, where they can be charged with high efficiency… not in stringing hundreds of thousands of miles of wires over all lanes of all major highways in order to inefficiently transmit power to trucks.

Using a pantograph electric power pickup may be economically feasible for trains running in dense urban areas, where high population density provides lots of taxes to help support mass transit. But it’s not ever going to make economic sense for trucks running long distances on public roads. Especially not in most regions of the USA, which has an overall population density about 1/10 that of western European countries.

“It is for areas where they can replace normal trucks for a set distance… From a port to a storage area for example.”

There are already multiple companies making “yard mule” or “port truck” semi tractors. This is one area where BEV heavy trucks have already quietly achieved commercial success. There’s no need to reinvent the wheel in this niche EV market; it’s already well served.

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“so far no one decided to invest in commercial operation, which suggests that battery-electric trucks are seen as a better solution.”

Yes, because commercial operation of battery electric trucks (in this size) is common. /s

“Unlike passenger cars, which remain parked and stationary most of the day, trucks are deployed for long hours in transport assignments when stopping to charge can be highly disruptive in the operations. E-highways offer rational and effective charging en route. The solution also saves batteries and reduces load on the energy network,”.

Thousands of trucks stay stationary for hours on big transport companies while they need to stop to rest and to charge the loads.
Don’t make us believe that we are monkeys.

BTW in 2020 the Semi will start to be delivered on Giant transport companies by hundreds.

Imagine how many more trucks Tesla could sell if you need not need a small portion of the battery for some countries….

Imagine how many fewer trucks Tesla (or any other BEV maker) would have the potential of selling, if such trucks were restricted to only driving on roads with overhead electrical power lines which provide sufficient power to drive a heavy truck.

If there is a chicken-and-the-egg problem with BEV adoption, due to lack of charging infrastructure, this so-called “solution” would make the problem 100 times or 1000 times worse!

“Thousands of trucks stay stationary for hours on big transport companies while they need to stop to rest and to charge the loads.”

Right. Mandatory lunch breaks, maximum hours per day for a driver, and only one driver per truck in nearly all cases, means almost all heavy trucks spend several hours a day sitting still. That offers the opportunity for BEV heavy trucks to be charged on a daily basis, even when driving long distances, so long as they stop for the off hours at a properly equipped BEV truck depot or a truck stop designed to handle BEVs.

There is a real economic potential for BEV semi trucks. If there wasn’t, then there wouldn’t be so many trucking companies buying Tesla Semi Trucks to use for testing.

It’s hard for me to take seriously any plans for using a pantograph power pickup system for modern EVs. EV tech should be moving forward into the 21st century, not backwards to the 19th!