San Diego Gas & Electric To Invest $7.5 Million To Develop Electric Car Awareness Program

MAY 23 2016 BY ERIC LOVEDAY 21

Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer speaks at SDG&E's electric vehicle news conference

Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer speaks at SDG&E’s electric vehicle news conference

General Motors Chief Engineer Electrified Vehicles Pam Fletcher recharges a Chevrolet Spark EV at the DC Fast Charger at Fashion Valley Mall Saturday, September 28, 2013 in San Diego, California.

General Motors Chief Engineer Electrified Vehicles Pam Fletcher recharges a Chevrolet Spark EV at the DC Fast Charger at Fashion Valley Mall Saturday, September 28, 2013 in San Diego, California.

San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) has announced a major initiative designed to boost electric car adoption in the utility’s service area.

SDG&E says that it will “invest $7.5 million over the next five years to develop a new education campaign to create awareness, expand electric vehicle (EV) ownership and lead the charge among large cities to electrify the transportation sector.”

The focus of the new education campaign will be to offer electric car ride-and-drives throughout the utility’s service area:

“SDG&E’s new education campaign will include EV ride-and-drives in every geographical area of the region. These events allow customers to test drive EVs from all the major car manufacturers at one location, familiarize themselves with the many benefits of driving an EV such as tax credits and rebates of up to $10,000, low fueling costs and environmental protection. The campaign will also provide funding to community groups that will promote electric vehicles and other benefits. These education initiatives are intended to inspire the next wave of new drivers to switch to an electric vehicle and expand the use of EVs to all geographic and socio-economic areas.”

SDG&E - Power Your Drive program

SDG&E – Power Your Drive program

In total SDG&E will spend roughly $52.5 million (including nearly $13,000 per one charging point – 3,500 spots at 350 sites).

SDG&E believes that by 2020, the number of electric cars on San Diego’s roads could quadruple from 20,000 to some 80,000.

The first 20 locations (multifamily communities and businesses) under the Power Your Drive pilot program are already committed.

“SDG&E is working to sign up 200 participants by the end of the year, in locations throughout all 26 cities in the region. At least 10 percent of the chargers will be in disadvantaged communities.”

Jeff Martin, SDG&E’s chairman, president and CEO said:

“California is known for new ideas and innovation, and development of life-changing technologies. Now, we are leading the U.S. in creating the leading standard for de-carbonizing electricity and advancing clean transportation. Some problems are solved by looking to the future, not the past, and this is one of them,” said Martin. “That is why we are reducing carbon in the transportation sector by installing charging infrastructure throughout the communities we serve, and maximizing the use of renewable energy to charge vehicles.”

Chairman/President/CEO Jeff Martin, City of San Diego Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer, City of Chula Vista Mayor Mary Casillas Salas, City of Imperial Beach Mayor Serge Dedina, IBEW Local Union 569 Manager Johnny Simpson, City Councilman Mark Kersey

Chairman/President/CEO Jeff Martin, City of San Diego Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer, City of Chula Vista Mayor Mary Casillas Salas, City of Imperial Beach Mayor Serge Dedina, IBEW Local Union 569 Manager Johnny Simpson, City Councilman Mark Kersey

San Diego Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer said:

“San Diego is a national leader in developing innovative solutions to reduce emissions and protect our environment. I am happy to see SDG&E working to strengthen our reputation in this field by installing thousands of new electric vehicle charging stations at apartments, condos, businesses and underserved neighborhoods throughout our great city.”

“San Diegans will not only save money on their gasoline bills, it will also help San Diego achieve its Climate Action Plan goals by cleaning up our air and reducing emission in the crucial transportation sector. Power Your Drive demonstrates once again why the nation looks to San Diego for leadership in urban sustainability.”

CPUC Commissioner Carla Peterman said:

“California is a leader in setting policy supporting the widespread deployment of electric vehicles. The SDG&E pilot program will not only make EV charging more available, which is important for driving the sale of cars, but it will test how charging can benefit the power grid and bring down electricity costs for all ratepayers.”

City of Chula Vista Mayor Mary Casillas Salas said:

“Chula Vista is proud to partner with SDG&E to provide clean air to our communities. Continuing our record of environmental leadership we are looking at electrifying our City fleet and are pleased to partner with SDG&E to install 60 charging stations at City facilities and more throughout our city.”

Full press release below:

SDG&E to invest $7.5M in EV education push; complement to $45M charging station initiative

17 May 2016

(SDG&E) announced it will invest $7.5 million over the next five years to develop a new education campaign to create awareness, expand electric vehicle (EV) ownership and lead the charge among large cities to electrify the transportation sector.

The education campaign will complement the $45-million pilot program recently approved by the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) to install 3,500 charging stations at 350 local businesses, multi-family communities and disadvantaged neighborhoods. The utility expects the combined $52.5 million comprehensive effort will increase the use of clean energy as a fuel for transportation and help consumers overcome any obstacles to EV ownership.

SDG&E also announced 20 multifamily communities and businesses that are committed to the growth of electric vehicles and charging stations under the company’s innovative Power Your Drive pilot program.

Among the participants to step forward and pledge to promote EV growth and charging included: American Lung Association; Bayview Baptist Church; Circulate San Diego; City of Chula Vista; City of National City; City of San Diego; County of San Diego; Cuyamaca College; Escondido Union High School District; Gildred Co.; H.G. Fenton Company; I Love A Clean San Diego; Jewish Family Services; Menlo Equities; Palomar College; San Diego Housing Federation; Sea World; Sony; UCSD; and UTC Aerospace.

SDG&E is working to sign up 200 participants by the end of the year, in locations throughout all 26 cities in the region. At least 10% of the chargers will be in disadvantaged communities.

SDG&E’s new education campaign will include EV ride-and-drives in every geographical area of the region. These events allow customers to test drive EVs from all the major car manufacturers at one location, familiarize themselves with the many benefits of driving an EV such as tax credits and rebates of up to $10,000, low fueling costs and environmental protection. The campaign will also provide funding to community groups that will promote electric vehicles and other benefits. These education initiatives are intended to inspire the next wave of new drivers to switch to an electric vehicle and expand the use of EVs to all geographic and socio-economic areas.

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21 Comments on "San Diego Gas & Electric To Invest $7.5 Million To Develop Electric Car Awareness Program"

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SparkEV

“low fueling costs”? That’s a laugh when SDGE rate is one of the highest in the area, if not THE highest. LADWP EV rate is about half that of SDGE, never mind the typical rate. I suppose that’s one way to squeeze more money out of people by duping them to drive EV under the guise of “low fueling cost” that’ll push them into even higher tier.

Solar doesn’t work for renters and condo owners. In fact, they’re fighting / reducing netmetering to make solar less attractive. Clean energy is not their goal.

DJ

I wholeheartedly agree with this. I am serviced by SDGE and have a Volt. I mainly charge at work for free but that is stropping soon. It isn’t worthwhile cost wise for me to charge at home. I already pay more than 40 cents a kWh which is more expensive than gas! Their TOU EV rate is also crazy expensive. Super off peak is like 20 cents a kWh! Unless you have solar which we now have charging and having to pay SDGE is not cheaper than gas. Low fueling costs my butt…

Speculawyer

Wow, PG&E doesn’t sound so bad.

kdawg

According to their webpage they charge 18.6c/Kwh for baseline.

If you go over the baseline, up to 130%, you pay 21c/kWh.

If you go over 130%, you pay 40.8c/kWh.

I don’t know how many kWh is considered baseline.

https://www.sdge.com/sites/default/files/regulatory/1-1-16%20Schedule%20DR%20Total%20Rates%20Table.pdf

SparkEV

They used to have 4 tiers so low users (eg. solar, energy savers) would pay less. They plan to eventually reduce that to 2 tiers so the low users would pay more.

In addition, the lowest rate for TOU EV is the base rate (~$0.19/kWh). LADWP had $0.11/kWh for EV, which was lower than the base rate (they may still do, I haven’t looked in months).

kdawg
SparkEV

Notice the super off peak rate is the same as base tiered rate. Notice the summer peak rate is higher than the highest tier! If you use bit more than your solar or use little electricity, you’d pay more to go with EV TOU. You’re likely to run the AC and fridge harder in summer peak hours and paying even more.

If (when?) some people get duped and find that they’re paying more for EV “fuel”, than their gasser, tiered or EV TOU, it’ll turn them off to EV even if they liked it before. Indeed, there was a comment about someone trying to return SparkEV when they found out that it was costing more in electricity than their gasser. And this is with second most efficient EV in market, not electricity hog like Tesla.

Dave C

SparkEV – you’re exactly right. I bought a Volt just over two years ago and within just a few months the peak rate went from 29c to 48c. I was lucky to be able to go solar last year, but no thanks to SDG&E. Hands down the worst utility.

D

Baseline varies but it’s around 300kWh a month. Charging a EV for a daily driver would easily go over that. Tier 1 and 2 aren’t bad in comparison to Tier 3 and 4 price wise but as many people who have an EV would default to being in the higher Tiers it’s not a lower fueling cost than gas at the momement. Maybe if gas were $5 to $6 a gallon but not at $3.

Jason

Depends where you live. On the coast it’s around 370. It’s higher as you go inland. I pay the .40. I’m around 900 a month with mine.

Just_Chris

Congratulations you just hit grid parity for solar + battery storage. Lowest cost battery systems add 20 to 25 c/kWh, if solar is around 13-16 c/kWh you can make and store power cheaper than you buy from the grid. Stay connected for the heavy usage days and try and maximise solar usage by load management.

Jon

Hopefully they will get sued for false advertising and be forced to lower rates for metered chargers

Speculawyer

Good! I’ve been disappointed with the lack of EV pushes by utilities. Are they not allowed to push EVs?

SJC

SDG&E had to pay $400 million for “gaming” the system like Enron, maximum profits at all cost to the consumer seem to be their method.

Michael Will

I welcome this – and solar will work for businesses and home owners. apartment renters will get that from the landlords in the future and more soon will want to destination charge and not at home, especially once there is enough range in a car to not have to be filled up 100% every morning. It all falls into place nicely.

Seth

That is impressive money, you could install over 37 DCFC double stall locations for that money, that would be enough to charge a whole lot of cars per day in a city.

Instead, they are going to use it for a education program instead of something the customers could have used today and tomorrow.

Talk about “help consumers overcome any obstacles to EV ownership”, or maybe i’m just jaded and I’m seeing this wrong.

Looks like half is already spent on the facade of the building 🙂

sven

And that Nissan LEAF didn’t wrap itself.

Jason

SDG&E is a joke. Every other electric company offers incentives to install a charger at home. Not them.

electric-car-insider.com

SDG&E, like most of California does not have low rates, although the time of use super off peak is 18c – 19c as kdawg posted (thanks!)

The good deal is Solar net metering with TOU. You get paid peak rates for your production, pay only off-peak if you’re not using a lot of energy during the day.

I’m in San Diego, pay $15 per month when I run the heat or AC, zero when I don’t. That includes charging 3 EVs.

SDG&E is very supportive of EVs, has a dedicated team. San Diego will probably continue to lead the nation in EV adoption. Part of that is because of SDG&E support.

Dave C

Wow, an SDG&E chearleader. No, SDG&E doesn’t support EV’s. Their lowest 18c kwh is 50% higher than even the average USA rate THEN, their so called “super off-peak” period is a measly 5 hours long, the shortest period of any utility. AND they offer zero incentives of any kind, unlike most other Utilities (even in CA). Unfortunately, if you don’t have solar, might as well stick with gas.

Jeffrey Songster

This is great to see. We need to keep raising awareness to get EVs past the early adopter phase.