Samsung SDI To Supply Lithium-Ion Battery Packs For BMW X5 eDrive Plug-In Hybrid

MAR 18 2015 BY MARK KANE 11

BMW X5 PHEV - Image Credit: Tom Moloughney

BMW X5 PHEV – Image Credit: Tom Moloughney

Samsung SDI is expected to provide batteries for the upcoming BMW X5 eDrive PHEV.

The Korean manufacturer is already supplying BMW with lithium-ion batteries for both the i3 and the i8.

For the plug-in, extended range X5, Samsung SDI produces 9.0 kWh worth of cells per copy.  That battery provides 13 miles (US EPA) of all electric range for the big SUV.  (For Europe, the plug-in has a 31km/19 mile NEDC range rating).

More details on the X5 xDRIVEe40 can be found here.

Recently, Samsung SDI acquired Magna Steyr’s battery pack division, which could be related to the contract with BMW.

“Local industry insiders and IHS, a global market researcher, speculated that the recent purchase of Magna Steyr’s battery pack division has opened the door for the South Korean company to strengthen its corporate ties with the German luxury carmaker. Magna Steyr is the subsidiary of Canadian car parts maker Magna International.

U.S.-based IHS said that under an earlier agreement reached between Samsung SDI and BMW, the former is expected to increase shipments of battery cells by at least 20-30 percent until 2016.

This arrangement could mean that Samsung SDI will be shipping batteries not only for BMW’s i3 small electric vehicle (EV) and i8 plug-in sports car but also the X5 eDrive to be released later in the year.”

It seems Samsung SDI is BMW’s supplier of choice for battery-related deals.

Source: Yonhap News Agency via Green Car Congress

Categories: BMW

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11 Comments on "Samsung SDI To Supply Lithium-Ion Battery Packs For BMW X5 eDrive Plug-In Hybrid"

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With this and similar announcements from other manufacturers of li-ion batteries for EVs, it finally looks like the output of the Panasonic/Tesla Gigafactory over the next few years will be matched, or even slightly outdone, by the additional manufacturing capacity being built out by all the other battery makers put together.

Of course, that also means that if things continue according to everyone’s announced plans, Tesla alone will have enough batteries to build as many long-range EVs as all the rest of the EV makers put together. Of course, many of those auto manufacturers have no intention of producing EVs in large numbers, and other EV makers have no intention of producing anything but short-range EVs.

“. . . it finally looks like the output of the Panasonic/Tesla Gigafactory over the next few years will be matched, or even slightly outdone, by the additional manufacturing capacity being built out by all the other battery makers put together.”

BYD alone will match the Gigafactory’s output by 2020. In a previous comment, you miscounted and overestimated the Gigafacory’s battery cell production output; it’s 35 GWh per year, not 50 GWh per year. The 50 GWh figure includes 15 GWh of battery cells imported from Panasonic’s Japanese factories. Tesla will use the 35 GWh of US made batttery cells and 15 GWh of Japanese made battery cells to assemble 50 GWh of battery packs in the Gigfactory. See my comment below for more details and links:

http://insideevs.com/tesla-ceo-elon-musk-tweets-battery-swap-tesla-stock-price-model-s-range-more/#comment-654922

Thank you for the correction, sven. My bad for not going to the source for that figure, and relying on what was reported elsewhere, but I did not “miscount”.

Anyway… annual production of 35 GWh of batteries from the Gigafactory in 2020 is indeed the correct figure for what Tesla is projecting.

http://www.teslamotors.com/sites/default/files/blog_attachments/gigafactory.pdf

It seems like Tesla is in constant negotiation with Samsung SDI. Last I heard, they had all but agreed to produce 40% of the batteries for Model X up to 2018. The deal seemed to balance on Samsung supplying touchscreens to Tesla as well.

Since Samsung will start manufacturing their cells in China this year – it seems that cost-cutting is part of this recipe. I know a $35,000 Model III is the goal and that will require inventiveness and smoothed corners – but I sure would take MADE IN USA batteries into consideration before I pull out the checkbook.

Made in China has many considerations for me. Although I know my cellphone is made in China and a good deal of domestic products in my home – I’m always on the look for non-Chinese made anything I can purchase, be it clothes, hard goods or electronics.

China may be the big cheap “maker” these days, but they also are not our friends.

Who is our “friend”? Some of our “friends” were our enemy at one point in history.

So you are all about buying Chinese goods? Ever read about the working conditions and child labor in their factories? You good with that?

It’s about time America become a maker nation again and not a taker nation.

On top of that – you good with Communism?

I’m just not getting your retort. Even if the batteries were built in one of our nation’s allies’ factories, it would be foreign workers profiting and their economies instead of our own.

Who are our “friends?”

China was our ally in WWII, and Japan was our bitter enemy. Today they are both our “friends.” This could change tomorrow of course, but I certainly hope we can all get along with each other.

GSP

Well, I hope this massive increase in battery consumption pushes down battery prices. It has got to start having an effect.

Thanks.

They should at least have a 1 in front of that 31 Km to deserve the e in the cars name.

13 Miles for such a big SUV is huge! A typical gasser would take a full gallon of gasoline to go that far! That means that every day you drive this thing instead of the gasoline X5, you save at least a gallon of gas? I’m going to go out on a limb here and say that many people will save more gas by trading their gas X5 for this PHEV X5 than those trading in their Prius for a Volt.