Road Tripping And No Tesla Supercharger? This Hack Is the Answer

FEB 2 2019 BY EVANNEX 70

NO SUPERCHARGER? NO WORRIES, THIS TESLA OWNER HAS A HACK FOR ROAD TRIP CHARGING [VIDEO]

The first question the unenlightened ask of EV owners is invariably, “what do you do when you run out of charge?” And we invariably reply, “You don’t run out of charge, any more than you run out of gas in a legacy vehicle. You plan your trips and plug in well before the range indicator gets near zero.”

*This article comes to us courtesy of EVANNEX (which also makes aftermarket Tesla accessories). Authored by Charles Morris. The opinions expressed in these articles are not necessarily our own at InsideEVs.

Above: Tesla’s Model S driving on Highway 40 (Flickr: Paul Sableman)

However, before we get too smug about it, let’s remember that unforeseen problems can and do crop up when on the road. As your correspondent has observed firsthand (and written about), in the real world, it’s quite common for public chargers to be unavailable for a variety of reasons. They may be out of order, inaccessible due to road construction or wrecks, ICEd out or simply occupied – and not even the stupendous Superchargers are immune to these problems.

Fortunately, if for whatever reason you can’t get to a Supercharger or other public charger, there are other options, even in remote regions. The latest video from the Tesla sage who calls himself Dealer_of_Happiness describes one good way to find an emergency charge. Although it’s “becoming more and more difficult to find a spot where you’re out of range of a Supercharger,” it’s only prudent to know about this resource.

Every EV needs to have a 120-volt charging cable in the trunk for emergencies. Equipped with this, if you can find an electrical outlet, you can charge. If you’re in need of a cheeky charge on the highway, look for a rest stop. These almost always have outdoor outlets, and travelers have been using them to power various gadgets since long before the advent of EVs – at the rest stop the Dealer visits, a trucker is using an outlet on the side of the restroom building to brew a pot of coffee.

Above: When there’s no Supercharger, Tesla owners might find another option at highway rest stops (Youtube: Dealer_of_Happiness)

And you may be in need of coffee before you’re done charging. A standard 120-volt circuit will deliver only 3 to 4 miles of range per hour of charging to a Model S or Model 3, slightly less to a Model X.

Fortunately, there may just be a better option. At this particular rest stop, Dealer finds a 240-volt outlet mounted in a little wooden box. These are intended for the use of RVs, but if you have the proper adapter, they will charge your Tesla just fine. This one turns out to deliver 32 amps, good for up to 23 miles per hour of charging. According to Dealer, every US rest stop has one – I wouldn’t be too sure about that, but it’s certainly worth searching for one before you settle in with War and Peace at the 120-volt outlet.

Outdoor 120-volt outlets are not just found at rest stops. Dealer is being overoptimistic when he says that “every commercial building” in the US has one, but they are not rare. They can also sometimes be found on light poles in parking lots, or high up on telephone poles (they’re used to power Christmas lights, among other uses).

Above: With the right adaptor, you can plug an EV into all kinds of different outlets found on road trips (Image: Plugshare)

The key to a worry-free road trip is to be prepared. Keep a nice long extension cord and a selection of plug adapters in your trunk, and both the Chargepoint and PlugShare apps on your phone – both of these handy tools incorporate user comments, which can let you know if particular public chargers are out of order or otherwise problematic.

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Written by: Charles Morris; Source: Dealer_of_Happiness

*Editor’s Note: EVANNEX, which also sells aftermarket gear for Teslas, has kindly allowed us to share some of its content with our readers, free of charge. Our thanks go out to EVANNEX. Check out the site here.

Categories: Charging, Tesla, Videos

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70 Comments on "Road Tripping And No Tesla Supercharger? This Hack Is the Answer"

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I don’t know what the rules and norms are in the US, but if I was doing a similar thing in other countries, I would need to be sure I was allowed to use an electrical outlet before just plugging into it. Just because an outlet is accessible doesn’t mean that the building’s owner is happy for anyone to use it.

It’s often easier to obtain forgiveness than getting permission.

Also beware that public perception of EV charging is that it uses a lot of power. You will plug into a low powered socket, draw barely enough to drive a mile and cost the owner just a few cents, but you’ll be accused of costing him hundreds of dollars, and because power draw on the socket isn’t separately metered, it will be impossible to prove otherwise.

(I’ve seen people getting into exactly this kind of situation charging their mobile phones, so I dread to think how much it would amplified if you’re charging a car)

Of course it’s possible to prove otherwise. Record how many miles you started with and how many miles you ended with after the charge, and multiply that difference by the kWh/mile. Add up to 10% for losses. Confirm it by measuring the duration of the charge and multiply by 80% of the maximum draw of that outlet. That’s two methods to estimate the energy consumption.

In the US, the “norm” is “innocent until proven guilty”, not the other way like you’re suggesting. These “damages” are in the lowest bracket of any Small Claims court.

The real moral of the story: don’t let your charge get this low in the first place without a proper plan. The inconvenience alone justifies proper planning.

Small claims court is for civil damages only. Dumb people get booked for stealing $1 junk from Walmart every day in droves.

“innocent until proven guilty” – that’s just dumb.

Ignorance of the Law is no excuse – you’ll be charged with THEFT (pushing up the demand charge by $60 in this video is surely more than a trivial expense) – even though uneducated commenters THINK they are not using any electricity.

What country are you from, Bill? Dismissing “innocent until proven guilty” is a backwards medieval concept.

“Innocent until proven guilty” is both a founding principle of the US justice system and an international human right under the UN’s Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Article 11. Just in case you’re from Europe, the concept traces back to 6th-century Roman law in the Digest of Justinian (22.3.2), translated as “Proof lies on him who asserts, not on him to denies.”

Until you overturn all that to prove your allegation “that’s just dumb”, your posts are worthless, which apparently is all I need to prove my point to you.

Saying “innocent until proven guilty” is “dumb” is simply unAmerican.

Dr.Dauger that is just silly – that is *NOT* the way you measure electricity usage for commercial accounts in North America. Demand charges can be anywhere from $6-$20/kw and energy charges can be from $.04 to $.25 per kwh for commercial customers. Assuming the highest charge that could be accrued due solely to this car plugging in for 30 minutes – would be $156.80 for upping the monthly demand charge, and $0.99 for the energy usage. That’s 7.88 kw * $20 , and then slightly less than 4 kwh @ 25 cents per kwh. These are the highest – but keep in mind any pressure drop to the receptacle is paid for BY THE OWNER, so that the figures will be HIGHER at the establishment’s (Utility) revenue meter. These *ARE NOT* trvially sized THEFTS and are easily prosecutable. I was at a Drive Electric Event a few years back in Ithaca, NY, and, seeing as there were NO OUTLETS ANYWHERE on the main street where the event was held (contrary to the info Dr. Happy provided here), I asked a small store front owner if it was ok to run an extension cord to inside his shop to demonstrate charging.… Read more »
Bill is amazingly ignorant. First his unit “$6-$20/kw” is completely wrong, clearly proving the rest of his post is without substance. In my job, I do personally see and approve of paying commercial electricity bills, and we’re charged in $ per unit of energy. kw is not a unit of energy but a unit of power, which is energy in a given time. In the scenario of this article, we’re talking about a lone outlet in a remote location, nobody nearby, which is NOT a place where “demand charges” occur. (In an urban area, look up PlugShare for L2 and L3, obviating this topic utterly.) If I must do the math, a standard 120V outlet (5-15R is typical) delivers a maximum of 15A. I quoted 80% of maximum as the standard allowed draw of a 100%-duty cycle electrical device, to which charging EVs comply. 80% x 120V * 15A = 1.44 kW. So if you charge for one hour, multiply by 1 hour for the energy consumed: that’s 1.44 kWh. For TOU metering, the cost is as low as 9c/kWh at night and as high as 40c/kWh daytime during the week. Without TOU the marginal rate might be 28c/kWh. So… Read more »

It doesn’t matter if you steal 1 cent or 20 dollars in the US. It is still the same petty theft, criminal offence that gets you arrested if owner is annoyed enough, calls police and presses charges.

Then you are booked into jail overnight until somebody posts bond, or hopefully just asked to appear in court depending on locality, get criminal conviction record, fine, public mugshot for your life, and just like any criminal are restricted from many things that you may take for granted otherwise. Like getting employed in sensitive job, getting professional license in many professions, security clearance, even renting a decent apartment or qualifying for programs like TSA Precheck. If you are not US citizen you may be deported or denied new visa even you got some kind of “forgiveness” from local judge – you still have arrest record for your life.

How dumb you need to be to assume “forgiveness”?

Post hard evidence of a “criminal conviction record” and beyond due to solely EV charging or else it didn’t happen.

If you’re thinking of Kamooneh in Georgia, that matter was dropped 5 years ago by the county, so it’s moot.

Really guys, this matter relating to EV charging was settled 5 years ago. Kamooneh spoke for himself on IEVs:
https://insideevs.com/nissan-leaf-owner-arrested-for-electricity-tells-his-side-of-the-story-and-where-we-go-from-here-as-a-community/

It “wasn’t really so much about theft, but more about trespassing …” “The solicitor responsible for prosecuting the charges reportedly laughed when my lawyer asked her what she was going to do. She dropped the charges.”

And so what that police dropped charges and there was no private property owner to press it?

He still spent night in jail and has arrest record for his life, that he is going to explain to everybody checking his criminal history and finding it.

But if somebody thinks it is ok to steal a bit of electricity because it is just few cents and nobody cares, please go on, I can’t help if your family didn’t explained it to you in your childhood.

zzzzzzzzz You would have a point in your argument – I mean – the fanboys here say go ahead and charge and if you get caught, its ok to spend a night in Jail since after all – you ARE CHARGING A TESLA !!!! and nothing must be allowed to come in the way of that!!

That’s how silly some of these articles are…. The owner seems to disagree with the ‘TITLE’ here – that of a BIG REVOLUTIONARY HACK, when he is just using the car’s included standard equipment charging cords.

Of course – I can imagine the JOYFULNESS that will ensue – when someone brings all their 30 ampere adapters in the trunk and goes to an RV park, and finds that the only TT-30’s at the park (travel trailer) are 120 volts ONLY.

More demerits for someone who provides fact-based commentary. Jeez.

BILL LIVES IN A WORLD WHERE ALL CAPS MAKES IT A FACT.

Good comment. I think we should ask whenever possible. In an emergency, I would do my best to contact someone or leave a note. I’ve used TT-30/120v at a KOA tent site (30 amps is nicer than 12amps!).
Graphic credits via: wiringchartdiagram.com
https://wiringchartdiagram.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/l14-30r-wiring-diagram-stunning-nema-l14-30-wiring-diagram-49-about-remodel-5-pin-relay.jpg

“So what”? It matters that zzzzz is lying by omission, leaving out two unignorable ingredients of the Kamooneh case:
1. An unusually ignorant policeman from Georgia who was asserting is authority like a caveman with a bruised ego;
2. Kamooneh defying the policeman and telling him off.

Reading the IEV article, this is already hashed out: it was more about the trespassing and pissing off the policeman than about electricity consumption. Zzzzz repeatedly omits these facts, and if he ignores them again in his next post or issues more ad hominems, that proves he’s posting baseless FUD and has given up on any merit to his position.

THAT IS A MYTH – if you push up the business’ demand charge (charging during the day will cause this) then it is NOT a trivial amount of money as ‘Dr. of Happiness’ plugged into a HIGH-POWER Nema 14-50 which typically would raise the demand fine on the electric bill around $60.

This guy might be a foreign exchange student and not be familiar with what is tacitly allowed and what is not, but as almost everyone worldwide is saying here – you are basically committing THEFT if you don’t see any signage EXPRESSLY ALLOWING IT (FREE EV CAR CHARGING, etc) and don’t ask permission or offer to pay first.

Bill resorts to ad hominems and all-caps because his position has no merit nor evidence to support. In the scenario of this article, we’re talking about a lone outlet in a remote location, nobody nearby, which is not a place where “demand charges” occur. (In an urban area, look up PlugShare for L2 and L3, obviating this topic utterly.) A standard 120V outlet (5-15R is typical) delivers a maximum of 15A. I quoted 80% of maximum as the standard allowed draw of a 100%-duty cycle electrical device, to which charging EVs comply. 80% x 120V * 15A = 1.44 kW. So if you charge for one hour, multiply by 1 hour for the energy consumed: that’s 1.44 kWh.

For TOU metering, the cost is as low as 9c/kWh at night and as high as 40c/kWh daytime during the week. Without TOU the marginal rate might be 28c/kWh. So the daytime electricity cost is as high as 58 cents! We’re talking about 58 cents. Who would possibly have a fit over 58 cents?!? Questions of trespassing, etc., therefore make the electricity consumption moot.

This is a matter already decided 5 years ago:
https://insideevs.com/nissan-leaf-owner-arrested-for-electricity-tells-his-side-of-the-story-and-where-we-go-from-here-as-a-community/

That’s why you need to have facts at hand to tell the owner just how little it’s costing, and be willing to pay cash if needed.

I can’t believe this Leptoquark. – not sure what country YOU are in but in North America it is not “Demand Contracted for”, but “Demand Measured”. Did you watch the video? Facts on hand? No offense but the OWNER has the electricity bill, and most commercial owners are savvy to what they pay, and why. Its you who DOES NOT have the facts. Commercial accounts differ from residential (domestic) ones, at least in North America.

In my job, I do personally see and approve of paying commercial electricity bills in California, and there is no evidence to support your allegation, particularly the road-trip scenario described in this article: a lone outlet in a remote location.

digital meters that prove this are available for under 20 bucks. The one I have is only 15 amps though.

Of course it’s possible to prove by calculation: In the scenario of this article, we’re talking about a lone outlet in a remote location, nobody nearby. (In an urban area, look up PlugShare for L2 and L3, obviating this topic utterly.) A standard 120V outlet (5-15R is typical) delivers a maximum of 15A. I quoted 80% of maximum as the standard allowed draw of a 100%-duty cycle electrical device, to which charging EVs comply. 80% x 120V * 15A = 1.44 kW. So if you charge for one hour, multiply by 1 hour for the energy consumed: that’s 1.44 kWh.

For TOU metering, the cost is as low as 9c/kWh at night and as high as 40c/kWh daytime during the week. Without TOU the marginal rate might be 28c/kWh. So the daytime electricity cost is as high as 58 cents! We’re talking about 58 cents. Who would possibly have a fit over 58 cents?!? Questions of trespassing, etc., therefore make the electricity consumption trivial.

Multiple driver’s have been arrested for theft when stealing electricity. Always offer to PAY before using

Yeah – I’m very surprised IEV’s even ran this article as this could be seen by an aggressive lawyer as stating this is officially an “APPROVED” method to charge your car and that instead the article is obviously encouraging THEFT.

Verbal objections by the editors to the contrary – the VIDEO shows unauthorized usage taking place (what we’d normally call THEFT) .

Just to show this is not something to be toyed with , a friend of mine sat on my porch and plugged in his cell-phone and I got a call from the police stating “WE have a COMPLAINT (!!!!) about You!) – there was an ‘unauthorized person’ on my porch stealing my electricity. (Obviously one of the neighbors called the police and didn’t recognize the person as a friend of mine) – to which I calmed them down and stated he has the RIGHT in my house (granted by me personally) to use a nominal amount of electricity for his cell-phone and there is no issue.

Evidence to support?

Unless… you’re slapped with a heavy fine, or your vehicle is impounded, vandalized or towed. It’s usually easier to ask permission first, so that saying is a load of complete tosh.

A hundred tumbs up for this one!

If you drive an $80,000 car, do you really need to steal electricity?

Bingo. Don’t feed the anti-EV movement by behaving like a thief.

Generally should ask permission of the property owner. Rest Stops though are generally publicly funded. You don’t ask to pay for water to drink from a public water fountain, or to pay to use the sink to wash hands or to use the toilet. So I would think if they have open plugs, should’t be an issue to grab a bit electricity while you rest. Rest stops were put in as a public safety and convenience. Might as well use them. Government could get their sh!t together and install some L2, and DCFC at the rest stops that people could pay for. Then it wouldn’t be an issue.

Agreed.. As long as we’re talking about a rest-stop, it makes sense. After all, if they don’t charge for the RVs to use the plugs, then there is no reason an EV can’t use them either. Now if it were just any commercial building, that’s a different story.

I don’t think there is any suggestion here that an EV owner should steal electricity from private buildings without permission. Just that they probably exist, and if I was in that situation, I might stop at a road side diner and ask permission even though they don’t have a proper charging stand.

Exactly my point 🙂

I would NEVER us a 120 volt plug to charge my EV, the BMW i3, and that’s one of the most efficient EV’s out there. It just takes too long. I suppose in an emergency and you need 10 miles of range, but that would take 3.5 hours. That’s insane.

If you’re going to find yourself in this situation often look at the BMW i3 REX. Bring your own charging infrastructure with you.

Edit, maybe Tesla needs to offer a MiniTrailer, with a super efficient gas engine generator for those countries with no EV infrastructure?

Over 90% of trips in the US can be covered by a 120 V outlet at home. If you include home and work with 120 V, the figure is well over 95%. This according to Idaho National Labs research. My household personally has probably done over 60,000 miles on 120 V. Not long trips of course, just around town over ten years.

I also carry a short, heavy-duty extension cord with a standard 3-prong plug because the ginormous plug on my Leaf 110V charger won’t fit inside some of the outdoor outlets that have covers on them.

Yes, good tip! I’ve found that too, and I bought one that I used already.

That shirt……

Glad you liked it 🙂 it’s one of my favorites

Some chargers can indirectly kill people in situations where actually a RCD should do its job to save people! -> https://www.westernautomation.com/rcd-blinding/
And e.g. a Schuko plug (in Europa quite common for situations where you don’t have a EV charger) wasn’t made to deliver >2kW for hours! It’s nomal value of 3.7kW can only be used for some minutes. So it’s possible to damage the infrastructure there. There are CEE plugs for that, even for one-phase.
And beside that, it’s stealing of electric energy if you don’t have the permission, like stealing fuel.

notting

Electricity in North America is Intrinsically safer than in Continental Europe since it is only 120 volts to earth. Your ‘Residual Current Detectors’ (RCDs) are called Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters in North America, but they are the same thing. Also, even at older receptacles in North America without GFCI protection, the ‘charging cord’ or Wallbox has a built – in 20 milliampere trip-point detector. So at least the car charging equipment is essentially protected, and the car will not begin to charge if the ‘safety earthing system’ is malfunctioning.

As regards THEFT – people who wrote this article do not remember about the Guy who plugged in his Nissan Leaf by the parking lot where he was watching his daughter play, and the cops arrested him.

He had tacit permission to use the washroom, toilet paper, water, soap, and paper towels, but none of the electricity.

“At this particular rest stop, Dealer finds a 240-volt outlet mounted in a little wooden box.”
That’s even at little bit more than in Europe.
And lower voltage for some power means higher current. Higher current means more problems like thicker wires necessary, more problems with any sort of electric contacts, etc. So what’s “safer” now depends of the point of view.

notting

https://insideevs.com/nissan-leaf-owner-arrested-for-electricity-tells-his-side-of-the-story-and-where-we-go-from-here-as-a-community/
Bill is lying by omission, leaving out two unignorable ingredients of the Kamooneh case:
1. An unusually ignorant policeman from Georgia who was asserting is authority like a caveman with a bruised ego;
2. Kamooneh defying the policeman and telling him off.

Reading the IEV article, this is already hashed out: it was more about the trespassing and pissing off the policeman than about electricity consumption. Bill repeatedly omits these facts, and if he ignores them again in his next post or issues more ad hominems, that proves he’s posting baseless FUD and has given up on any merit to his position.

I have 10,767 miles of all-electric road trips under my belt, and yes I follow the Boy Scout motto “Be Prepared”. My most recent long trip was a 20-day 4647-mile family road trip last summer: http://tesla.dauger.com/roadtrip1808/ We traveled through 10 western states to see National Parks and sites including Yellowstone, Grand Tetons, Devil’s Tower, Mt. Rushmore, Petrified Forest, Capitol Reef, Bryce, and the Million Dollar Highway using both Supercharger and Destination Charging. “Be Prepared” means not only the right equipment but good planning. I bring every adapter I have and a NEMA 14-50 extension cord, and I plan out my trip so that the charge stops are timed for comfort for my children and allow time for all our sightseeing, but I research for “optional” Superchargers (these can be skipped) and contingency charging in advance as a “safety net”. Fortunately I’ve never had a charging stop that was outside my “plan”. We stopped at many “optional” Superchargers, not due to the car, but for bio breaks for my kids. My plan told me where to be more careful with my driving because it told me in advance where my “safety net” was thin. As you can see from my site,… Read more »

My idea behind this video is not in any way to promote public outlets for charging your EV. Message I was trying to send is that you won’t get stranded if you will find yourself outside of reach of supercharger network.
It’s emergency only use case.

Nice advertisement for EVANNEX overpriced (~$600!) adapter kit.

Actually all equipment that I used in a video is standard Tesla cables. No adapters needed.

Admittedly I did not watch the entire video but RV parks, in general, are equipped with 30 and 50 amp service. You will probably have to pay for the spot but worth noting if you are in a pinch.

It is NOT as easy as this guy in the video makes it look, but I highly recommend getting out there and treading new ground. I always have my eyes peeled for NEMA 14-50 outlets and if the property owner is amenable, put the location on plugshare. I don’t waste time looking for 120V outlets but if you are absolutely desperate, look for those mini-split outdoor units. In America, most of those installs are retro-fits and by code are required to have a 120V outlet immediately adjacent to them, which due to the retrofit is often a dedicated outlet.

Yes and there are directories on line for RV parks. 30 amp service is usually 120 V, 50 amp service is 240 V BUT the circuit breakers are often worn out and will not deliver a full 50 amps for long. Just dial back to 35 or whatever. Hot weather is the worst, cold weather usually allows higher current before a worn out breaker trips.

Never miss an opportunity to go talk to a property owner and offer to pay for the charging you need. I will often plug in, start charging, and go talk to the front desk or property owner about what I’m doing, how much it will cost in electricity ($1-$2), and ask them if they would like me to pay for it and how much. If they are not too bothered and genuinely curious about EVs, I might get a chance to talk to them about the benefits of installing a networked L2 charger. Interactions have been occasionally weird but generally positive (nobody got irately mad) and they understood that I NEEDED the power and they respect the fact I’m willing to pay for it. Sometimes they ask for $10 per hour… which I won’t argue, I’ll just pay $10 and leave in an hour.

Also recommend for the EV road warrior a $35 “EPICORD RV Power Adapter (2) 30Amp Male To 50Amp Female RV Electrical Connector with Handles, Light (2.5 Feet)” which you can find on a certain Seattle based online retailers website.

How is this is a HACK?
It’s just extremely painful L1 and L2 charging using your own EVSE.

A real charging hack would be that idiot in China that climbed an electricity utility pole and hacked into the power grid.

Since we can all agree that hack is extremely dangerous, the better message would be to simply bring your own EVSE and plug adapters if you believe your trip will need them. Lifehackers think that anything they do is a hack.

Actually, there is a network of 30 amp/240 plugs across the USA. They are trailer parks, that is common feed for RVs. RV parks are used to having requests for odds and ends to their services. Examples include showers and laundry. A couple bucks given for an hour 30/240 charge will get you back on the road.

Fyi RVs places are called CAMPGROUNDS not trailer parks..
http://www.rv.net

Trailer parks are where mobile homes are parked

Not around here in NY State Scott. There are tt-30’s (120 volt, 30 amperes ONLY) and 14-50’s ( 190-240 volt Tesla outlets – some KOA campgrounds tell you to lower your draw to under 32 amperes – for $$$ connection charge and a per hour rate), and 5-15’s or 20’s (plain jane 120 volt stuff). Nothing else.

Just imagine it Tesla makes a CCS adapter like they now use in Europe. Then the 500 new Electrify America Fast Charge Ports would be available. On a trip most people want Fast Charging.

Lots of hotels have a small laundry on site with a NEMA 14-30 outlet, if you have a long enough extension cord. I have run a cord out of a hotel window to a parking spot below more than once, although NEMA 6-20 is about the most I find in hotel rooms.

HAHA! I thought about using the 6-20 (for the unit heater/air conditioner for the room), but decided against it since the motel manager could make a BIG STINK about it and say you are TAMPERING WITH THEIR HVAC EQUIPMENT!! (and fine you).

You have Tacit permission to use only the 5-15 convenience outlets you find in the room. Although I always ask even here – if it is ok – when checking in – I ask the manager “My battery is running a little low and would you mind if I plugged in my Battery Charger?’. Then at least this tends to preempt any trouble since, after all, I DID ASK permission – even if the manager was confused as to what I was talking about.

Why is doing the obvious with manufacturer supplied accessory cords called a hack?

I would be concerned about the legality of just plugging in. Fine if I was also buying a valuable item, or had found and asked the owner, but just using an outlet that happened to be outside?

RiGHT – Some arrogant EV drivers think that the world OWES them free electricity. I was talking to one owner of a few commercial store fronts who, since he drove a Tesla “X” himself – put a 80 amp wallbox outside his establishment. He allowed complimentary charging up to 4 hours (sufficient for the old ‘double charger’ ‘S”‘s) but then it was agreed you had to move your car.

He had trouble with one other EV owner:

“I need to charge for 6 hours”.

“Fine. You may charge here for 4 hours then you have to immediately move your car”.

“I demand to stay here until I’m finished charging and YOU CAN’T MAKE ME LEAVE”.

Store owner: “This is not a gov’t installation – you charge only if I say you can since I’m paying for all the facilities and all the electricity used by you. You have no RIGHTS at all”.

“arrogant EV drivers think that the world OWES them”: Classic straw man argument, at the first line. That’s a great reason to ignore his posts. Bill’s credibility is zero.

Dr. of Happiness didn’t say exactly where he was – but in other than state-run Welcome Centers – where the whole state taxpayers pay for it and it is just meant to showcase the Magnanimous State you are just entering – I really can’t believe a PRIVATE company would allow you to suck $1.80 per hour out of their hide (if in 30 cent /kw-hour downstate NY) (not to mention pushing up their demand charge $60-$72 or so). The truck drivers obviously are either ‘renting’ the space, or it will be tacitly assumed that as long as the truck driver eats at the truck-stop – they have no problem with them plugging in their coffee pot – since they spend money at the establishment all the time. If you are not a semi driver, all bets are off since the company isn’t getting any money from you. Another big error of generalization in the video is that “Commercial buildings have outlets everywhere!”. That simply isn’t true. I was at a popular coffee shop the other day – (Tim Horton’s), and there was not a SINGLE publicly accessible outlet INSIDE OR OUTSIDE the building. You couldn’t charge a celly or a… Read more »

Are there Teslas that max out at 32 amp? I thought they all went to at least 40 amp. Seems like he could have stepped it up even faster.

The second generation Tesla UMC maxes out at 32A. Personally, I have used a first generation UMC on my Model 3 LR and get 40A.

Correct. 32A is just a limitation of my gen 2 UMC that came with my car. Gen 1 is 40A.