This is just further proof that we can't rely on EPA range tests to parallel real-world driving.

Our good friend Sean Mitchell recently had the opportunity to drive a Tesla Model S Performance Raven. He decided to see how much estimated range the car could achieve in comparison to the EPA's estimate. which is 348 miles.

We rely on the EPA's estimated range and efficiency for electric cars, just like we rely on MSRP for pricing. The reason we do this is that these are standards for comparison across the industry. While the EPA range testing cycle is more realistic than others like WLTP and NEDC, you can't count on it as the gold standard.

As we've shared and proven on numerous occasions, some cars can barely achieve the EPA's estimates, while other cars far exceed them, such as the Porsche Taycan. As Alex Dykes (Alex on Autos) pointed out, the same is true of gas cars. You're not likely to get the EPA-estimated miles-per-gallon (mpg) in your car.

There are many factors involved in a car's range and efficiency, including temperature, weather, speed limit, driving style, terrain, etc. Mitchell speaks to some of this in the video. His estimate easily beats the EPA's, plus he was traveling on the highway with 75-mph speed limits in Colorado, where the mountainous roads have an impact on range.

Check out the video for all the details. Then, leave us your range test results in the comment section.

Video Description via Sean Mitchell on YouTube:

Performance Model S Crushes 348 Mile EPA Range