Which Tesla version to choose?

In the most recent months, the majority of plug-in cars sold in the U.S. were Teslas. The domination of the Californian company was especially high in the BEV category where it took from 75% to almost 90% of sales. This is why in this post we will focus particularly on Tesla and its three cars - Model 3, Model S and Model X.

We gathered all the models and versions (battery and motor options) to compare three basic parameters – the price after destination charge and federal tax credit, EPA range and 0-60 acceleration times.

Tesla Model S, X & 3 comparison for U.S. (February 19, 2019)

The three Tesla models are available in a total of 11 versions (some hardware and some software differences). Those versions are currently no longer signed by battery capacity (75, 100, etc.).

Model 3:

  • Mid Range, Rear-Wheel Drive
  • Long Range, All-Wheel- Drive
  • Performance (Long Range, All-Wheel- Drive)

Model S:

  • Model S
  • Model S with Extended Range
  • Model S Performance
  • Model S Performance with Ludicrous Mode

Model X:

  • Model X
  • Model X with Extended Range
  • Model X Performance
  • Model X Performance with Ludicrous Mode

By range and price

The comparison by range doesn't give us much of differentiation as after Tesla retired the 75 kWh versions of Model S and Model X, all are equipped with the same 100 kWh battery we believe (the base versions seems to be software limited by 8%). It's expected that over time Tesla will introduce some new offer, again with two battery options.

In the case of the Model 3, there are two battery options - Mid and Long Range, so the step change in range is significant.

Tesla Model S, X & 3 comparison for U.S. (February 19, 2019)

By range and acceleration

In the case of acceleration, there is a significant improvement when selecting higher versions. The 0-60 mph time can be cut by roughly 40-50% between base and top of the line versions.

Tesla Model S, X & 3 comparison for U.S. (February 19, 2019)

*some models estimated