Watch What “Serious” Autonomy Means In The Renault ZOE Callie – Video

1 week ago by Mark Kane 7

Renault has presented a very special ZOE – named Callie, which is equipped with a serious autonomous obstacle avoidance system; one that matches professional test drivers.

Groupe Renault Debuts a World’s First in Autonomous Obstacle Avoidance that Matches Professional Test Drivers

Such a capability is an industry first according to Renault.  And at some point in the future, it could be part of the brand’s autonomous driving package.

The Callie was developed at the Renault Open Innovation Lab in Silicon Valley, California.

By 2022, Renault intends to have 15 models equipped with various levels of autonomous driving capabilities.

“The Renault Open Innovation Lab is part of the Labs network within the Alliance and is focused on improving safety and advancing autonomous driving technology. The technological advancement announced today:

  • Has been inspired by and tested against professional test drivers
  • Complements Renault’s existing achievements in driver-assistance systems (ADAS) and vehicle safety and is an important next step in using autonomous driving to improve vehicle safety
  • Will support Groupe Renault’s goal of becoming one of the first brands to offer widely available “Mind off” technology on mainstream vehicles and deploy fleets of robo-vehicles

The basis for this work comes from research published by Stanford University’s Dynamic Design Lab (led by Professor Chris Gerdes, former Chief Innovation Officer of the U.S. Department of Transportation) that Renault Open Innovation Lab has been collaborating with.”

Simon Hougard, Director of Renault Open Innovation Lab – Silicon Valley said:

“At Groupe Renault, we are focused on being an innovation leader in products, technology and design. Our innovation efforts aim at developing advanced autonomous driving technologies that consumers can trust will create a safer, more comfortable journey.”

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7 responses to "Watch What “Serious” Autonomy Means In The Renault ZOE Callie – Video"

  1. pjwood1 says:

    I believe a cap (or agreement?) exists on how much toque an auto-steer system can deliver. Tesla’s auto-steering strength doesn’t do much more than veer the car in different directions, for example.

    This system is clearly a high-torque emergency maneuver. If it gets it wrong, there could be no human recovery. Too fast.

    1. Dan says:

      Probably more for PR than actual production capability. I would imagine that the most conservative action even in the scenario shown is to brake rather than swerve. Videos of cars braking don’t go viral though.

      I wonder if this is the same car that has been testing on Boston’s seaport district roads.

      1. Alonso Perez says:

        Actually the way to avoid a collision that’s imminent is rarely braking.

        In general if something surprises you on the road, braking will not stop you anywhere near fast enough. Worse, panic braking can cause someone to rear end you, and before ABS could get you killed in slippery conditions.

        The most important tool of any driver is the big round thing in front of you. Till autonomous cars rule the land, anyway.

    2. Terawatt says:

      If autonomous cars are ever to succeed they’ll have to be in control. Human override isn’t a part of this, quite simply.

      But I think it’s much farther away than Tesla would like me to believe. My guess, and that’s all it is, is that we won’t see any road legal fully autonomous car that can drive the kids to soccer practice without a driver in the car at all this side of 2030.

      I’m certainly not prepared to shell out a big sum of money for infirm promises of future autonomous capability… which I believe is what Tesla’s selling. Thankfully it’s possible to get the Model 3 without AP. And Tesla’s even promised all the safety features will be enabled without any optional extras, so the most important part is apparently free…

      1. Curt C. Richerund says:

        Yeah, 10 years plus.

        People forget that it took over a decade for the Flight Director software in airbus to get approved for rollout.
        And, this problem is MUCH harder.

      2. Doggydogworld says:

        2030, or perhaps just a LITTLE sooner:

        Waymo testing empty drivers seat on public streets:
        https://medium.com/waymo/with-waymo-in-the-drivers-seat-fully-self-driving-vehicles-can-transform-the-way-we-get-around-75e9622e829a

  2. Peter says:

    This is a part of level 5 that needs no human override.

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