Proterra Electric Buses Reached Two Million Miles of Revenue Service

2 years ago by Mark Kane 10

 Proterra electric bus and charging station

Proterra electric bus and charging station

Proterra Electric Buses

Proterra Electric Buses

Proterra boasted an achivement of 2 million miles (3.2 million km) of revenue service logged – all covered by its pure electric buses.


Equivalent to a bus traveling coast to coast 855 times, from San Diego, California to Jacksonville, Florida


According to Proterra there is 63 buses on the roads  today (we believe mostly EcoRide BE35 and some new Proterra Catalyst), while the total sales reported is at “more than 122 vehicles to 15 different transit agencies“.

“With 63 buses on the road today in Texas, California, Massachusetts, Nevada, Kentucky, Tennessee, Florida, South Carolina and Washington, Proterra is ramping up production in 2016 to meet the market’s growing need for clean, quiet, efficient transit solutions. These highest-performing electric buses are making both an economic and environmental impact on the communities they serve today. In aggregate, Proterra has saved transit agencies across North America over 420,000 gallons in fuel and prevented more than 7.6 million pounds of CO2 emissions.”

“This year, Proterra will nearly double its production capacity as an increasing number of transit agencies see zero-emission buses as a credible and proven alternative to diesel, CNG and hybrid buses. With 30 percent fewer parts than alternative technologies, the Proterra Catalyst dramatically reduces maintenance and operating costs and is more cost-effective over the 12-year life of each bus, saving customers around $450,000 over the vehicle’s lifetime. The Proterra Catalyst is also the most efficient 40’ transit vehicle, with the longest range per kWh of energy storage and the lowest fuel cost per mile, at 22 MPGe and 1.7 kWh/mile.”

King County Metro's All-Electric Proterra Catalyst FC Bus

King County Metro’s All-Electric Proterra Catalyst FC Bus

Ryan Popple, CEO of Proterra said:

“This latest milestone exemplifies the economic, environmental and civic value of electric mass transit and demonstrates to the transit agencies that diesel—often viewed as a necessary evil—is no longer necessary. By democratizing electric mobility through zero-emission mass transportation, we are providing both our customers and their passengers alike the best transit technology on the road today.”

Small transit operator Clemson Area Transit (CATBUS) in Seneca, South Carolina in 2014 became the first transit system in North America to completely electrify its entire fleet using Proterra buses.

Al Babinicz, executive director at CATBUS said:

“We’re proud of the precedent we set early on and are pleased to see our transit agency peers begin to adopt transit solutions like Proterra’s that address the economic and environmental hurdles we’re facing as a nation,”.

Other important customer for Proterra is Foothill Transit in Pomona, Calif. Doran Barnes, Executive Director at Foothill Transit said:

“For the last five years, we’ve been operating Proterra zero-emission buses and are excited to expand our electric fleet with 13 new Catalyst® vehicles coming into service. With the latest round of Catalyst buses, nearly 10 percent of our fleet will be all-electric, a fact we’re extremely proud of.”

Proterra Zero-Emission Buses Complete Two Million Miles of Service.Milestone is equivalent to a bus traveling coast to coast 855 times, from San Diego, Calif. to Jacksonville, Fla.

Proterra Zero-Emission Buses Complete Two Million Miles of Service.Milestone is equivalent to a bus traveling coast to coast 855 times, from San Diego, Calif. to Jacksonville, Fla.

King County Metro's All-Electric Proterra Catalyst FC Bus

King County Metro’s All-Electric Proterra Catalyst FC Bus

As a bonus we adds new video from King County Metro in Seattle, which presents ride from passenger perspective.

ELECTRIC BUS!!! King County Metro BRAND NEW 2016 Proterra Catalyst BE40 4601 on Rt. 226 

Taken Monday February 22nd
It’s amazing how much buses have changed over the years here in the Seattle Area from the Bredas, to the first DE60LFs, to the Xcelsior Nation, etc. I’ve gotta say other than the seating layout in the back and the rattling, I really do like this bus, it sounds really good. HOWEVER this technology isn’t perfect yet, we almost ran out of battery after the video ended and had to skip Bellevue College, OOPS!!! Anyways, let me know what you think of this bus and your opinion on having electric buses here in the Seattle area!!!”

 

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10 responses to "Proterra Electric Buses Reached Two Million Miles of Revenue Service"

  1. mhpr262 says:

    I had imagined it to be a bit quieter … the transmission of that thing must have straight-cut gears with teeth like a Tyrannosaurus Rex for decades-long heavy duty use.

    1. Alpha777 says:

      That sounds like the electric motor.
      Someone at the factory forgot the sound insulation.

      This is a tragic mistake.

    2. ffbj says:

      It has been determined that the T-Rex was the most accident prone of all the dinosaurs.

  2. Kevin C. says:

    For the love Krishna people! I love the sound of no exhaust in the morning. It smells like victory.

    I hope I live long enough to forget the stink of diesel and natural gas exhaust. Gag,cough,cough,gag.
    (The smell of unlimited market share)

    1. ffbj says:

      Apocalypse Now! HaHa.

  3. Battery Bro says:

    Honestly, it didn’t sound too loud to me. And it makes the cool electric vehicle “power-up” sound.

    I wonder, does the engine need to be larger or more noisy to accommodate electrical energy?

  4. sven says:

    As a lifelong NYC subway and bus commuter (aka straphangar), the only time I’ve ever seen actual straphangers was on the subways cars at the NYC transit museum.

    http://www.thefreedictionary.com/straphangers

    But those old-fashion bus bell cords made a comeback a few years ago after going extinct in the 1980’s, and being completely replaced by pressure-sensitive wall-mounted yellow strips of tape. Now all NYC public transit buses have the ubiquitous low-tech bus bell cords.

    http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/05/12/the-return-of-the-bus-bell-cord/

  5. Someone out there says:

    I agree that it’s too loud. That is the sound of energy being wasted, they should look into that.

  6. John J says:

    Really, it’s too loud?
    Sounds like you haven’t spent mush time on diesel buses.

  7. Paul says:

    They saved money and went with the noisier batteries.