Porsche Plug-In Hybrid U.S. Sales Comparison

APR 26 2015 BY MARK KANE 9

Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid sales - March 2015

Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid sales – March 2015

2014 Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid

2014 Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid

Porsche introduced its first plug-in hybrid model – the Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid – in the US in October 2013.

Since then, through to the end of March, 1,110 were delivered.

Comparing sales of the plug-in version to all sales of Panamera we find that between 10 and 15% of customers chose the plug-in.

For the whole of 2014, the average share for Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid was 15.3%.

In 2015, sales have started off by going down year-over-year, although 10% share is maintained.

Porsche Cayenne S E-Hybrid sale - March 2015

Porsche Cayenne S E-Hybrid sale – March 2015

The Porsche Cayenne S e-Hybrid (from $76,400) Had A Decent First Month Of Sales In The US - Selling 45 Copies ... we think it can go much higher in the future!

Porsche Cayenne S E-Hybrid

Porsche Cayenne S E-Hybrid has been available for just five months. Sales are slightly higher than for Panamera S E-Hybrid.

Average share through the first 309 sales stands at over 5% of all Porsche Cayenne sales in US.

Porsche, despite being an established brand, probably must reconcile that Cayenne S E-Hybrid will be massively oversold by the all-electric Tesla Model X when it eventually arrives.

Porsche 918 Spyder sales - March 2015

Porsche 918 Spyder sales – March 2015

Porsche 918 Spyder

Porsche 918 Spyder

There is third plug-in model – Porsche 918 Spyder, but even we at InsideEVs struggle to count it as an electric car.

Anyways, 154 deliveries in less than a year indicates that many customers of high-end sport cars are willing to pick an electrified one over conventional drive.

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9 Comments on "Porsche Plug-In Hybrid U.S. Sales Comparison"

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Your statement “many customers of high-end sport cars are willing to pick an electrified one over conventional drive” is correct, but we do not know what drives the decision.

Buying a Porsche is “conspicuous consumption”, not transportation. At this point, PHEV adds a bump in “conspicuous”, and creates an additional talking/bragging issue.

I fear this may change as EV technology becomes more common.

I suspect the main reason is access to the carpool lane. Other than that, it is pretty useless since it is such short range.

I was under the impression these Porsche vehicles do not qualify for HOV access (at least not in California):
http://www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/carpool/carpool.htm#vehicles

Well damn . . . then they are really useless. Can’t see why someone would get this instead of a Tesla.

I think these cars are a good example of where legislation is working in a very positive way. The EU say 95gCO2/km as an average by 2020, from the look of their latest Porsche models they have accepted this and are moving on.

I don’t disagee with you about why people buy a Porsche but Porsche are likely to resist the development of separate US and EU drive trains so we may end up at a point where the us buyer has his choice limited by eu legislation. Either way my opinion is the future of porche is the phev.

“but we do not know what drives the decision.

Buying a Porsche is “conspicuous consumption”, not transportation. ”

I liked “we do not know”, better than your following remark. A lot of sports car buyers are into technology. Electric drive / PHEV flattens the torque curve out, and keeps the driver from finding the typical sweet spot, of an ICE’s “rev band”. It keeps him/her from having to keep the turbo “on boost”, when braking 7 minutes at the Ring. It opens up better power allocation, as we’re finding out with Tesla AWD, torque vectoring, etc.

In the past, we’ve had systems apply the brakes, for traction control, while the car is “on the gas”. Enormous waste, and hard to control. If you’ve ever seen a $4,000 ceramic brake rotor destroyed by the over-application of rear brakes, from TC, you’d appreciate more how cars like the 918 fix things, for people who see driving differently a bit differently than most of us.

Well the bright side is that they can now predict a 5 to 15 % of sales of a model would be a plug in.
This is the first step to electrification – having a clear chunk of all market segments that are electrified.

That’s a really good point. Compared to overall marketshare of under 1%, 10-15% is pretty good for one specific model where it’s an apples to apples comparison between the different powertrain options.

The 918 may be electrified, but don’t forget it is the current record holder for production sports car around the Nuburgring. Some may just be concerned about having one of the fastest cars around. To them, electrification is just icing on the cake.