Porsche CEO Says Automaker’s Future Hinges On Mission E Success

JAN 26 2018 BY MARK KANE 26

Porsche Mission E Alongside Porsche 356

Outlining the future of Porsche, CEO Oliver Blume said that the future of the brand hinges on the success of all-electric Mission E.

The German brand is choosing a three-pronged strategy for future models:

  • emotional ICE sports cars
  • plug-in hybrids
  • sporty electric vehicles

Porsche Mission E Alongside Porsche 356

60% of Panamera deliveries in Europe have been the PHEV version. This has convinced the automaker to expand efforts in the plug-in hybrid direction.

Porsche is hoping for the same feedback for the Mission E, the brand’s first all-electric model.

In Porsche’s press release on the matter we see this in regards to the Mission E:

The future of Porsche sports cars is already coming up to the starting line in the form of the Mission E, the first purely electrically driven technology champion from Zuffenhausen. This concept vehicle combines the distinctive emotional design of a Porsche, exceptional driving performance and forward-thinking everyday functional-ity. The four-door model with four individual seats delivers a system performance of over 440 kW (600 hp) and a range of more than 500 km, acceleration from 0 to 100 km/h in less than 3.5 seconds and a charging time of around 15 minutes for 80 per cent of the electrical energy required. Porsche has invested around one billion euro in this futuristic project, creating more than 1,200 additional jobs just at the head-quarters in Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen, where the Mission E will be built. “Porsche will always be Porsche – the leading brand for exclusive, sporty mobility”, reinforces Blume.

Porsche Mission E Alongside Porsche 356

Porsche is currently in a vulnerable transition period because its needs to maintain its high margins (highest in the VW Group), while increasing investments in EVs. This will require careful balancing of investments and pricing for electric vehicles.

If the Mission E is not a success, with all of the investments made, Porsche will likely lose its momentum. On the flip side, if the Mission E is successful, Porsche will likely turn more fully towards pure electric vehicles.

Full press blast below:

70 years of sports cars at Porsche

Porsche 70 Years Of Sports Cars

Stuttgart. Fast. Pure. Emotive. For the past 70 years, the Porsche brand has been synony-mous with sports car construction at the very highest level. The first vehicle to bear the Porsche name was registered on June 8, 1948: It was the 356 “No.1” Roadster. This is the day on which the Porsche brand was born. The Type 356 turned Ferry Porsche’s dream of a sports car into a reality. “His vision at that time embodied all of the values that still define the brand to this day”, said Oliver Blume, Chairman of the Executive Board of Porsche AG, at yesterday’s New Year Reception at the Porsche Museum. Representatives from the state of Baden-Württemberg as well as from the city of Stuttgart and the worlds of politics, economics and society, joined Porsche to celebrate the beginning of its anniversary year with the slogan “70 years of the Por-sche sports car”. 

“Tradition is a commitment. Without our tradition and without our core values, we would not be where we are today”, explained Blume. “We plan to uphold the stand-ard of technical excellence set by Ferry Porsche well into the future. Intelligent dy-namic mobility has a great future ahead of it. And we have the solid technological expertise, creative employees and unique team spirit to be involved. We have what it takes to ensure that the Porsche brand continues to fascinate – even in another 70 years.”

The history of the Porsche brand begins in 1948. Yet the foundation of the sports car manufacturer is built upon the life’s work of Professor Ferdinand Porsche – work which his son Ferry then continued. Ferdinand Porsche had already designed pio-neering innovations for the automotive industry as early as the start of the last cen-tury. In 1900, he built an electric car with a wheel hub drive known as the Lohner-Porsche, a vehicle on which he would then base the world’s first all-wheel-drive passenger car. In the same year, he created a template for hybrid vehicles with the development of a mixed petrol-electric powertrain. In 1931, Ferdinand Porsche founded his own engineering office. The “Berlin-Rome Car” showcased in 1939 was the beginning of his idea for a sports car bearing the Porsche name, although this dream was only realised by his son Ferry in 1948 with the Type 356.

The successor model to the 356, the Porsche 911 designed by Ferry Porsche’s son Ferdinand Alexander, finally gave the company its breakthrough as one of the lead-ing manufacturers of sports cars in the world, both from a technical and a design perspective. The Porsche 911, presented to the global public for the first time in 1963, has now been built over a million times. “Although the 911 has been consist-ently developed in the intervening decades and enhanced many times over with new, innovative technologies, no other vehicle has managed to retain its original essence in the same way as the 911”, says Blume. “All Porsche models to be devel-oped now and in the future are based on this sports car. As the centrepiece of the brand, the 911 has become the sports car of dreams, winning the collective heart of enthusiasts all over the world.”

The future of Porsche sports cars is already coming up to the starting line in the form of the Mission E, the first purely electrically driven technology champion from Zuffenhausen. This concept vehicle combines the distinctive emotional design of a Porsche, exceptional driving performance and forward-thinking everyday functional-ity. The four-door model with four individual seats delivers a system performance of over 440 kW (600 hp) and a range of more than 500 km, acceleration from 0 to 100 km/h in less than 3.5 seconds and a charging time of around 15 minutes for 80 per cent of the electrical energy required. Porsche has invested around one billion euro in this futuristic project, creating more than 1,200 additional jobs just at the head-quarters in Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen, where the Mission E will be built. “Porsche will always be Porsche – the leading brand for exclusive, sporty mobility”, reinforces Blume.

Porsche is celebrating this year’s anniversary with numerous activities around the world. On February 3 “The Porsche Effect” will open at the Petersen Automotive Mu-seum in Los Angeles. In Germany, the first “70 years of the Porsche sports car” ex-hibition will open from March 20–31, at “DRIVE, the Volkswagen Group Forum” in Berlin. The Porsche Museum will also be holding its own anniversary celebrations with a comprehensive special exhibition opening on June 9. On the same day, Por-sche will be inviting sports car fans to its “Sports Car Together Day” at all of its sites around the world. For the weekend of June 16–17, the sports car manufacturer will host employees, residents of the Zuffenhausen district and prospective customers to a public celebration in and around the Porsche Museum in Stuttgart. The “Festival of Speed” held from July 12–15, at the Goodwood race track in the UK will also cele-brate the anniversary, as will the “Rennsport Reunion” in California from September 27–30. The celebrations will conclude with the “Sound Night” event to be held for the first time in the Porsche Arena in Stuttgart on October 13. Further information is available at https://www.porsche.com/museum/en/.

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26 Comments on "Porsche CEO Says Automaker’s Future Hinges On Mission E Success"

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mx
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mx

We’ll see if the Porsche customer base will support the Electric Revolution. BMW’s didn’t. Too bad, the i3 is a Joyous Rocket, if you choose to drive it so.

The thing about Advanced Technology: It’s ADVANCED Technology. The ICE engine is JUNK in comparison. Even the electric heater in an electric car OUTPERFORMS an ICE.

mx
Guest
mx

In fact, you could say the BMW customer base has destroyed BMW’s future.

Because, building the next “i3” on an old platform that has to support a gas engine. and a plugin hybrid puts that platform at a Strong Disadvantage to Tesla.

JR
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JR

The I3 is build on a new platform, very simular to the tesla, and all new EV design, battery covering the bottom of the car, they also used a new, carbon/plastic material more strong than steel!

Jason
Guest
Jason

You can’t really compare the i3 to the other BMW vehicles. If the i3 was styled asking the lines of the M3 I think the outcome would have been a bit different, but the i3 is styled in a completely different direction to what your average BMW customer is expecting, so how can you blame BMW customers if i3 didn’t do so well?
And if you compare to Tesla then BMW should have done an M7 EV version by now, that commands the higher price and could support the long range batteries the same way Model S has done.
No, BMW is to blame, not their customers.

GreenMD
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GreenMD

+1. I actually test drove an i3 intending to probably buy one, but my wife gave it a non-negotiable “no” based on styling alone. I waited another year for the Gen 2 Volt to come out, which was an easy “yes” because it wasn’t embarrassing. The Leaf was so ugly, it was never even in the running.

Jacked Beanstalk
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Jacked Beanstalk

And then Chevy went and copied the i3 styling for the Bolt.

So far only Tesla seem to understand that an EV is a sophisticated sports car and should look like one.

Bill Howland
Guest
Bill Howland

mx: “…Even the electric heater in an electric car OUTPERFORMS an ICE.”

If you are talking about the Seat heaters, yes. If you are talking about the general cabin heater or battery heater, that is a DEFINITE NO….

My Bolt ev in cold weather (-16 deg C) uses ten times the electricity from the wall outlet as it does in the spring or fall – the main energy waster being those two heaters, both of which in my moist climate are necessary. Under such conditions a VOLT or Prius Prime make much more sense since the ‘wells to wheels’ of such cars when gasoline powered is much higher than my BOLT ev.

I Justify my BOlt’s operation since such conditions are only a small minority of its yearly driving. In the spring or fall it is difficult to beat its efficiency.

Dan
Guest
Dan

Unless the heater is heat pump based the electric heater is a primitive electricity waster.

Running motors on electricity: good. Turning electricity directly into heat: acceptable when absolutely necessary, wasteful otherwise.

ICE cars use unavoidable waste heat for the heater which has no effect on range or fuel consumption.

eltosho
Guest
eltosho

L-)

F150 Brian
Guest
F150 Brian

The mission E is by far the most emotional design we have seen in this market. Kind of weird that they tagged “emotional” with the ICE category.

Assuming they can bring this to market in Model S price range ($85K target was previously stated) with at least half the level of emotion in the concept’s design, they will not be able to build enough of them, regardless of the opinion of the Porsche faithful.

CDAVIS
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CDAVIS

… Yes the mission Mission E has shot at being very successful but only if it has access to a convenient and reliable supercharger network for those occasional long distance trips. Otherwise the Tesla Model S will have a huge advantage over the Mission E.

.
Guest
.

See Ultra-E, MEGA-E and IONITY. The charging networks are getting ready.

dinhh68
Guest
dinhh68

In 10 years if you’re lucky. Even then, that’s only a fraction of Telsa’s superchargers

Dan
Guest
Dan

Can’t T superchargers be used on other vehicles with an adapter? If not T is missing an potential source of profit…. something they need.

Hauer
Guest
Hauer

Why would they clogg up their SCs?

They will need all the capacity for their TM3 customers.

pjwood1
Guest
pjwood1

“they will not be able to build enough of them”.

How right you are. The Reuter’s piece, about demand from Porsche for its ~14KWh Panamera PHEV batteries, really affirms they are in a tough spot:
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-porsche-electric/battery-suppliers-struggle-to-keep-up-with-demand-for-porsches-panamera-idUSKBN1E923I
You can’t product plan, if you don’t have batteries, or can’t even land contracts for cobalt.

Porsche’s (er VW’s) backwards “sports EVs first, touring/SUV second” philosophy helped take this EV decision out of their control.

It’s insulting, to the concept of engineering.

Step away from the internet for a while?
Guest
Step away from the internet for a while?

“It’s insulting, to the concept of engineering.”

You’re taking this way too personally LOL

Kdawg
Guest
Kdawg

Poor man’s Tesla Roadster, but I think it would be received well.

Jake Brake
Guest
Jake Brake

I came to that realization too, and also that I’m poor. This is the gen 2 roadster I’ve been wanting. Sub 100k, long range, fast, and likely more durable than a tesla.

EVSHOPPER
Guest
EVSHOPPER

Bring back the 356 as an all electric for $35k.

Bill Howland
Guest
Bill Howland

Now me, I’d take an electrified 1960’s 911

Scott
Guest

I own a Model X. I will never own another ICE car. Any vehicle that handles well, performs well, and lots of range will be a hit. Before you had choices of 80 miles of poor range, poor performance/handling, and knife tires. Tesla set the new standard which auto makers are not happy to follow but must to survive. With huge batteries, I have only charged at home with my solar panels. For a trip, I fly. Nice not to go to a dirty, smelly gas station every week for 10 minutes. The mission E will be a success. My wife has a Panamera 4 S. We both fight over the Tesla. A Tesla and a Mission E will look good in the stable. This is from a car guy that has had many expensive sports cars and exotics!

Chris Ken
Guest
Chris Ken

Exactly where I stand. My wife Tesla S, me still A7. If together, we always take the Tesla because Freude am Fahren and Vorsprung durch Technik. Eat that, BMW, Audi. I also will never ever buy another car which is not a full EV.

Get Real
Guest
Get Real

The Mission E is a Porsche, it is going to be HELLACIOUSLY expensive!

Your subjective reality?
Guest
Your subjective reality?

Porsches are not “HELLACIOUSLY expensive!” for their segment. Most of their models come in under $150k, well-appointed. For what you get, that’s very reasonable. If the Mission-E is less than $125k (I very much doubt it will list at $85k), it will be very competitively priced vs a similarly appointed Model S.

Jacked Beanstalk
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Jacked Beanstalk

$125K isn’t “HELLACIOUSLY expensive?”

Must be nice to have so much disposable income.