Porsche 919 Tech To Transfer To Production Mission E

The Porsche Mission E

AUG 3 2016 BY ERIC LOVEDAY 23

 

The Porsche Mission E, A Pure Electric Supercar Had Its World Premier At The 2015 IAA

The Porsche Mission E, A Pure Electric Supercar Had Its World Premier At The 2015 IAA

Porsche recently issued a press release that essentially states that much of the technology employed in the automaker’s LMP1 Porsche 919 Hybrid race car will make its way into the production electric Mission E.

Here are a few highlights from the press release:

  • With the 919 Hybrid, Porsche has developed a new field of technology at racing speed. For the “Mission E”, a fully electric road-going concept sports car unveiled in 2015, the designers adopted the 800-Volt technology from the prototype racer.
  • Arguably, Porsche’s bravest decision for the hybrid system in the 919 was opting for 800 volts. Establishing the voltage level is a fundamental decision in electric drive systems as it influences everything else – the battery design, electronics design, e-motor design and charging technology. Porsche pushed this as far as possible.
LMP1 Porsche 919 Hybrid

LMP1 Porsche 919 Hybrid

Porsche goes on to explain, in detail, what 800-volt technology (and power/energy density) means for both racing and on-road use:

“In both a road and racing car, power density and energy density must be balanced. The higher the power density of a cell, the faster energy can be recharged and released. The other parameter, energy density, determines the amount of energy that can be stored. In racing, the cells – figuratively speaking – must have a huge opening. Because as soon as the driver brakes, a massive energy hit comes in, and when he boosts, it must leave at exactly the same speed. An everyday comparison: If an empty lithium-ion battery in a smartphone had the same power density as the 919, it would be completely recharged in less than a single second. The downside: A brief chat and it would be empty again. For the smartphone battery to last for days, there must be a higher storage capacity, therefore energy density is a priority.”

“In an electric car for everyday use, storage capacity translates into range. In this regard, the requirements of the racing car and a road-going electric car are different. The 919 hybrid has advanced into regions of hybrid management that were previously unimaginable. The 919 served as the trial vehicle for the voltage level of future hybrid systems. Important basic knowledge was discovered during the LMP1 program, such as, cooling for energy storage (battery) and the electric motor, the connection technology for extreme high-voltage as well as battery management and the system’s design. From this experience, the colleagues in production development gained important expertise for the four-door concept car Mission E with 800-Volt technology. From this concept car a production vehicle will appear by the end of the decade to become the first purely electric Porsche.”

Porsche says that the production Mission E will have the following specs:

  • 500 km (310 mile) all-electric range
  • 0-100 km (62 mph) in “under 3.5 seconds
  • over 600 hp (440 kW) via two motors
  • 4 seats
  • 200 kmh (124 mph) in under 12 seconds.

And lastly, Porsche has made it known that, unlike the Tesla Model S, its production electric Mission E will be able to be pushed to the max over and over again without any issues.

Full press blast below:

Hybrid technology in the LMP1 Porsche 919 Hybrid

Atlanta, Georgia. This weekend, the Le Mans Prototype Porsche 919 Hybrid has its only 2016 appearance in Germany. At the six-hour race to be held on the Grand Prix circuit of the Nürburgring, the fourth round of the FIA World Endurance Championship (WEC), the series’ leader fights to defend its title. At the same time its mission is to revolutionize the technology of future sports cars.

With the 919 Hybrid, Porsche has developed a new field of technology at racing speed. For the “Mission E”, a fully electric road-going concept sports car unveiled in 2015, the designers adopted the 800-Volt technology from the prototype racer. Porsche has exhausted all possibilities in designing the two-time 24 Hours of Le Mans winner – especially in terms of the drive concept. It consists of a two-liter, V4 turbocharged gasoline engine – the most efficient combustion motor that Porsche has built up to now– and two different energy recovery systems.

During braking, a generator at the front-axle converts the car’s kinetic energy into electrical energy. In the split exhaust system, one turbine drives the turbocharger while another converts surplus energy into electrical energy. The braking energy contributes 60 percent, with the remaining 40 percent is produced from exhaust gas. The recuperated electrical energy is stored temporarily in a lithium-ion battery and feeds an electric motor “on demand”, meaning, the driver can accelerate and call up the energy at the press of a button. In accordance with the latest regulation changes, the power from the combustion engine is just under 500 hp and the output from the electric motor is well over 400 hp.

The use and interplay of these two energy sources require a sophisticated strategy. In every braking phase, energy is recuperated. On the Nürburgring’s 3.2-mile Grand Prix circuit, this happens 17 times per lap, before every corner. The amount of recovered energy depends on the severity of the braking maneuver, or in other words, the speed at which the driver arrives at the corner and how tight it is. Braking and recuperation last until the apex of every corner, the driver then accelerates again. In this moment, the aim is to utilize as much energy as possible. Therefore, the driver steps on the throttle using fuel energy, and also “boost” electrical energy from the battery.

While the combustion engine drives the rear-axle, the electric motor takes care of the front-axle. The 919 catapults out of the corner without any loss of traction using all-wheel drive – and in the process recuperates energy again because on the straights, the extra turbine in the exhaust tract is hard at work. At consistently high engine speeds, the pressure in the exhaust system increases rapidly and drives the second turbine which is connected directly to an electric generator. Both energy sources, however, are limited by the regulations: a driver may not use more than 1.8-liters of fuel per lap and no more than 1.3 kilowatt hours (4.68 megajoules) of electricity. He must calculate this carefully so that at the end of the lap he has used exactly this amount – no more, no less. He who uses more is penalized. He who uses less, loses performance. It is important to stop “boosting” and lift off the throttle at exactly the right moment.

Converted to the 8.469-mile lap of Le Mans, which is the scale model for the regulations, the amount of electrical energy allowed is 2.22 kilowatt hours. This corresponds to eight megajoules – and that is the highest energy class stipulated in the regulations. In 2015, Porsche was the first and only manufacturer that dared to push the limits so far. In 2016, Toyota is also competing in the eight megajoule class. Audi uses six megajoules. The WEC regulations almost completely balance these differences.

For the concept choice of the Porsche 919 Hybrid, a very close look at the individual alternatives was taken. There was no question that Porsche would use the braking energy from the front-axle as this means a large amount of energy from areas already partially developed in 2015 combined with massive progress in the updated 2016 car. For the second system, two solutions were considered: brake energy recuperation at the rear-axle or through the utilization of exhaust gas. Weight and efficiency pointed in favor of the exhaust solution. With brake energy recovery, the system has to recuperate energy within a very short space of time, which means coping with a lot of energy but at the expense of weight. The acceleration phases, however, are much longer than the braking phases, which allow a longer period of recuperation and make the system lighter. Additionally, with the combustion engine, the 919 already has a drive system on the rear-axle. Adding more power at the rear would have made wheel spin less efficient, leading to heavy tire wear.

Arguably, Porsche’s bravest decision for the hybrid system in the 919 was opting for 800 volts. Establishing the voltage level is a fundamental decision in electric drive systems as it influences everything else – the battery design, electronics design, e-motor design and charging technology. Porsche pushed this as far as possible.

It was difficult to find components to accommodate the high-voltage, particularly a suitable storage medium. Porsche chose a liquid-cooled lithium-ion battery, with hundreds of individual cells, each enclosed in its own cylindrical metal capsule – 2.7 inches high and 0.71 inches in diameter.

In both a road and racing car, power density and energy density must be balanced. The higher the power density of a cell, the faster energy can be recharged and released. The other parameter, energy density, determines the amount of energy that can be stored. In racing, the cells – figuratively speaking – must have a huge opening. Because as soon as the driver brakes, a massive energy hit comes in, and when he boosts, it must leave at exactly the same speed. An everyday comparison: If an empty lithium-ion battery in a smartphone had the same power density as the 919, it would be completely recharged in less than a single second. The downside: A brief chat and it would be empty again. For the smartphone battery to last for days, there must be a higher storage capacity, therefore energy density is a priority.

In an electric car for everyday use, storage capacity translates into range. In this regard, the requirements of the racing car and a road-going electric car are different. The 919 hybrid has advanced into regions of hybrid management that were previously unimaginable. The 919 served as the trial vehicle for the voltage level of future hybrid systems. Important basic knowledge was discovered during the LMP1 program, such as, cooling for energy storage (battery) and the electric motor, the connection technology for extreme high-voltage as well as battery management and the system’s design. From this experience, the colleagues in production development gained important expertise for the four-door concept car Mission E with 800-Volt technology. From this concept car a production vehicle will appear by the end of the decade to become the first purely electric Porsche.

Categories: Porsche

Tags: ,

Leave a Reply

23 Comments on "Porsche 919 Tech To Transfer To Production Mission E"

newest oldest most voted

That front end lighting system is still unaerodynamic.
I cannot believe Porsche will put that into production, especially on an EV.

Headlights: it appears the 919 uses clear skins (Acrylic?) in front of their 4 point lights, many cars today do the same or similar, for maintaining the Aerodynamic face, so I expect they will tweak the design the same way, to cut that nose drag bucket the initial style shows, above.

How will they charge an 800 volt battery with existing 400 volt DC fast chargers? In theory, 800v is a better use of energy- half the current, smaller cabling, and many power electronic components are rated 1,200 v. But it seems like charging options would be limited. Please enlighten me.

I’ll charge same way as you can harvest 120, or 240V outlets to charge most EV’s 300-400V drive systems.

I understand this at level 1 and 2 charging currents with the actual charger in the vehicle. My understanding of fast chargers is they bypass the on board charger and connect directly to the battery with output in the range of 4-500 VDC max.

My thinking is you’d get the faster charge from 400VDC, with perhaps minimal losses as fed through an onboard inverter. Is there anything to stop such hardware? -Your budget is ~$150,000 😉

I see two options: boost converter in line with the charge port, or a split battery pack that can switch from series to parallel. My guess is the first option. Boost converters have been used a lot for HEVs and FCEVs:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boost_converter#Applications

Thanks for the great info! I’ll be reading up on boost converters. The split battery idea may be a cheaper solution since only switching contactors would be required vs power electronics.

“If an empty lithium-ion battery in a smartphone had the same power density as the 919, it would be completely recharged in less than a single second. ”

Wat.

Last I checked there was 3600 seconds in an hour. Charging in 1 second would be equivalent to 3600 C. Last I checked, no, there was no type of Lithium Ion battery that could charge at 3600 C.

+1

Worth reading twice for anybody unfamiliar with how much kinetic waste racing produces. Braking is violent. This is awesome stuff. 800 volts mean thinner wires to convert more braking energy into storage, with less weight. And if you’ve ever “over-volted” any electronic device, you know what happens to its output. Shoot, the voltage dip as a P85D loses charge is an obvious lesson, itself. IMO, the difficult thing to watch will be Porsche’s choice to delay an all-battery car until it truly has endurance. LMP1 allows 61.20 megajoules of gasoline energy, to just 4.68 from electricity (converting from 1.8 liters). We can talk about 800 volts all we want. The real hurdle will be going from “4.68” megajoules, to 65.88 per lap! To get the full 65.88 megajoules, per 5 mile lap [(1.3/2.2)*8.4], we can convert to 18.3kwh each time around. Asssuming a battery hasn’t melted or gone up in flames, you might get 4 laps before pitting in for a recharge (Not bad – close to a 20 minute “drivers ed” session, in PCA). Where is the state of battery technology that can deliver this C-rate??? -That’s how long we’ll be waiting, unless Porsche either adds a REx or… Read more »

gorgeous car and they are going with race tested tech, awesome! without Tesla instigating they prob never would have done this so thank you Tesla too!!!

Not too little, but too late.

What will the Mission E be priced at: $200k+ ?

Volume will be laughably low, and it’s arriving 7-8 years after the Model S. Then, let’s see Porsche attempt to produce an EV (or any car) for under $40k list.

I’m thinking more like $300K+

If this car was avail today or in 2017 it would be Porsche +1.

…but it’s not.

A year from now Porsche will still be talking about this fantastical concept electric car that will at some distant future date be built.

In the mean time Tesla is TODAY selling a family sedan EV capable of doing 0-60 < 3.5sec …that is TODAY supported by a convenient and reliable supercharger network.

At some point tesla will increase their voltage as well. The all electric semi will be 800 volts …just wait and see

I guess at some point they have to increase the voltage. But it’s not a decision they are happy to make, as it takes lot of engineering work and extra complexity to make new superchargers compatible with old cars and new cars compatible with old superchargers.

Heh, 0.71 inches is 18mm, and 2.7 is 68mm. So these are protected 18650 cells. “It was difficult to find components to accommodate the high-voltage, particularly a suitable storage medium. Porsche chose a liquid-cooled lithium-ion battery, with hundreds of individual cells, each enclosed in its own cylindrical metal capsule – 2.7 inches high and 0.71 inches in diameter.” Well done Porsche, you have replicated a Tesla Battery pack. Good news, maybe you can switch to the 21700 while you are at it before the 2020 relase ;D Making the pack 800 volts does make sense for really high power. For comparison, the current P90D wouldn’t need a 1000+ amp fuse, but could do with a 500A fuse. It would still overheat without switching the cell chemistry though, so there is a challenge in that. You can solve the power levels by using more power cells or more energy cells. There is a tradeoff there. This is likely 192 cells in series (2*96) which would allow you to use a regular 50kW charger without a DC/DC converter by splitting the pack in 2 parallel strings. Would it make any sense for normal road use? Just charging, not really for normal use,… Read more »

Hi Seth:

You apparently didn’t see my response to your post about your electric service at home.

1). what would the charge be for ‘Four times the upkeep’ (assuming more than 25 amps)?

2). A 35 amp 230 volt single-phase service doesn’t seem like much. Do you have any resistance heating devices in the house, and do you have an ev to charge?

Better late then never. The upside is that Porsche takes engineering seriously, and builds to a high standard of build quality and driving dynamics. I have no doubt that their BEV will be very good. And very very expensive.

Crap, they are going to build an hibrid and maybe an full electric version….

They will find some excuse for that, like saing that germans need to drive for 3 hours at 250km/h, and that the electric car does not fit this requirements because the technology is not quite there yet.

Porsche seems to be making a big deal about 800 volts (to me basically its an irrelevancy – as long as the semiconductors aren’t too expensive), but the car still only goes around 300 miles. That will be able to be fully charged in, what was that? 15 minutes?

Do they plan on having a chilled water cooler at every charging point? It would be silly to put this much refrigeration in the car itself.

For the price you pay, and the number of people Porsche claims they are allocating to the project, I’m underwhelmed.