Plug-In Electric Vehicles Account For 3.2% Of California’s New Car Sales


Chelsea Sexton's Tweet Tipped Us Off

Chelsea Sexton’s Tweet Tipped Us Off

HOV Access a Perk For Plug-In Hybrid And BEV Buyers In California

HOV Access a Perk For Plug-In Hybrid And BEV Buyers In California

A Chelsea Sexton tweet tipped us off, with a link to a story on California’s current electrified vehicle sales.

“Hybrid electric and plug-in electric vehicle now account for almost 10 percent (9.6%) of all new car sales in California.”

“Electric vehicles, which registered nearly zero in state-wide new car-sales as recently as three years ago, are now taking a noticeable market share, according to the latest quarterly report released by the California New Car Dealers Association.”

According to the California New Car Dealers Association, 23,648 plug-in hybrids were registered statewide from January 2014 through the end of September 2014.  Additionally, there were 20,516 all-electric vehicles registered in California during that same timeframe.  Combined, PHEVs and BEVs account for 3.2% of California’s new car sales in during the first 9 months of 2014.

Electric Vehicle News adds:

“The combined total of 44,164 for the first nine months of 2014 already tops California’s electric vehicle sales for all of last year. In 2013, combined sales of plug-in hybrids and all-electric vehicles in California topped 42,000, up 500 percent from 2011.”

Growth in the plug-in vehicle segment in California is strong, that’s for sure.

Category: GeneralSales


18 responses to "Plug-In Electric Vehicles Account For 3.2% Of California’s New Car Sales"
  1. yoyodyn says:

    “Combined, PHEVs and BEVs account for 3.2% of California’s new car sales in during the first 9 months of 2014.”

    Shouldn’t that be 10%? Or did I misread the source?

    1. Eric Loveday says:

      The source is including conventional hybrids in to arrive at 10%. If we only add vehicles with a plug and exclude conventional hybrids, then the number is 3.2%.

      1. yoyodyn says:

        My mistake. Thanks for the clarification.

      2. Assaf says:

        wow, 1:2 vs. ICE hybrids is quite impressive, considering the latter have been around since the late 90s.

        Eat that, Toyota 🙂

        Now… if only more states could enjoy the variety of BEVs offered to Californians…

        …and if only California Leaf/Soul/etc. drivers could enjoy a viable intercity ChaDeMo network like has been in other countries for a while now…

        …here’s hoping 😉

  2. Anon says:

    Not high enough. 🙁

    1. EricP says:

      I agree, not nice enough. It’s hard to change minds. I feel 10% should be BEV and the rest should be PHEV or at least traditional hybrids. Pure ICE should not be allowed to sell in California.

  3. Alaa says:

    Norway is much higher.

    1. Spec9 says:

      Norway’s incentives are huge (no import tax, can use bus lanes, free parking, etc.) plus gasoline costs ~$9/gallon there. It is almost crazy not to get an EV in Norway.

    2. kdawg says:

      Norway is a tiny country.

      The #’s at my house are much higher than Norway. It’s 100% 🙂

      1. Vin says:

        Wow! I’m only at 75%. 🙁

  4. mustang_sallad says:

    If love to see how that compares to another market segment in California, say convertibles for example. Plug-ins surpassing convertibles in Calfornia would be a big headline!

  5. Spec9 says:

    Much higher than the rest of the country but I’d like to see it even higher. We need more choices of plug-ins available:
    -More long range BEVs (>200 miles) besides just the Tesla
    -An SUV PHEV (Damn Mitz Outland should be here.)
    -A mini-van PHEV
    -A BEV that is a CUV or SUV (Model X is coming but more would be nice.)
    -We need lots of medium range EVs (100 to 200 miles)

    1. Robert says:

      Spec, What do you think about a target range of 150 miles? What about 125 mile target range, at prices a bit less than the $35K target stated for the Model 3 Tesla, like – $30K for 150 miles, and maybe $26K for 125 miles?

      I think short range in an EV is a challenge, but even more so – an EV not equipped to access DCQC’s makes the issue worse! So – EV’s should all have DCQC capability on board, as well as faster AC charging, like 6.6kW+!

  6. bender says:

    Is there a breakdown of PHEV and BEV sales by county in California? I’m curious if almost all the sales ae concentrated in the Los Angeles and San Francisco areas, or if the inland “Republican” areas are also buying some.

    1. Spec9 says:

      Oh, I think you already know the answer to that question.

      But pure EVs would probably not be practical inland where they tend to drive further but PHEVs should do well there.

    2. ModernMarvelFan says:

      Most of the PHEV/BEV qualified dealers are concentrated around SF/SJ and LA area. So the chances that rural area of the California buying those cars are much smaller…

  7. suresh says:

    anyone has similar figures for geogia? i am hoping georgia still leads in pure electric segment. they can easily reduce the 5k incentive and expand them to include plugin hybrids like volt.

  8. Omar Sultan says:

    Since CNCDA is reporting the numbers, does that mean Tesla sales are not included?