No EV-producing automaker on earth can touch Tesla when it comes to getting maximum range from its batteries. Let’s look at the numbers.

The Ford Mustang Mach-E will be available in standard-range with a 75.7 kWh battery and long-range with a 98.8 kWh battery. Standard-range models with rear-wheel drive are estimated to achieve 230 miles of range and all-wheel-drive models will achieve 210 miles, while extended-range models with rear-wheel drive are shooting for 300 miles of range and all-wheel-drive models will achieve 270 miles.

So, Ford’s max-range setup is a Mustang Mach-E with a 98.8 kWh battery and rear-wheel drive that can go 300 miles per charge. Tesla has never confirmed the size of its batteries, but experts estimate the Model 3 Standard Range Plus uses a 60 kWh battery and Long Range and Performance models use an 80.5 kWh battery. SR+ models, available only in rear-wheel drive, have a range of 250 miles. Long Range and Performance models are available only in all-wheel drive, and have ranges of 322 and 310 miles, respectively.

For those of you playing at home, this means a Model 3 with all-wheel drive using a battery nearly 20% smaller can go 22 miles farther on a charge than a Mustang Mach-E with rear-wheel drive. If you want a more apples-to-apples comparison, the Model Y Long Range model with standard all-wheel drive is expected to use the same 80.5 kWh battery as the Model 3 and still achieves 300 miles of range. Go down the list of other EV automakers and the story is largely the same: big batteries that don’t put up the same range per kWh as Tesla’s do.