Pennsylvania Regulates NEVs – Removes Electric Bicycle Restrictions

JUL 12 2014 BY ERIC LOVEDAY 13

Now This Is A Proper E-Bike - Caterham Carbon E-bike

Now This Is A Proper E-Bike – Caterham Carbon E-bike

The Pennsylvania State House Republican Caucus issued this release:

Legislation sponsored by Rep. Mike Fleck (R-Huntingdon/Mifflin/Blair), that would regulate the operation of neighborhood electric vehicles, or NEVs, was unanimously approved by the House of Representatives,  House Bill 573 will next be considered by the Senate.

According to Fleck:

“The number of NEVs being used by Pennsylvania residents and businesses is on the rise and for that reason they need to be regulated.  For example, NEVs are a great means of transportation for residents of senior citizen communities. They’re also being used by businesses interested in cutting costs. I would like to thank my House colleagues for recognizing the need to have state guidelines in place to ensure they are operated safely.”

Fleck’s bill would regulate NEVs in such a way as to restrict when and where they can be driven.  If passed, NEVs could only be operated on roads with speed limits of 25 MPH or less and could not be driven at night.  Additionally, NEVs would be required to meet minimum safety requirement and be equipped basic safety equipment.  As Insurance News Net states:

“Under the legislation, NEVs would be required to be equipped with basic safety equipment, including brakes, windshield wipers, pneumatic tires, odometer, speedometer, seat belts and mirrors. In addition, NEV drivers would be required to possess a valid driver’s license, certificate of title, registration card and insurance.”

In moving to regulate NEVs, House Bill 573 aims to remove restrictions currently placed on electric bicycles (e-bikes).  If passed, e-bikes will not have to be registered, insured and titled, though their operation will be restricted to individuals 16 years of age and up.

Source: Insurance News Net

Categories: Bikes, General

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13 Comments on "Pennsylvania Regulates NEVs – Removes Electric Bicycle Restrictions"

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TomArt

Sounds reasonable, on its face…weird that Republicans would be quick to regulate something…normally, they froth at the mouth against anything remotely related to “regulation” unless they are trying to destroy the use/practice of whatever they are trying to regulate…that’s a huge difference between the parties these days…Democrats use regulations as a means for the encouragement and advancement of efficiency and safety, while Republicans use regulations as a means to impede progress.

TomArt

I hope I’m wrong this time.

Mike

WHAT! That’s Extremely Restrictive. As a NEV can usually do up to 50 mph. This is another Republican Kissing the Oil Industry Axx.

This whore should be kicked out of office.

twas brillig

AGREED!

DaveMart

Alternatively they could regulate the size, weight and speed of automobiles which use roads utilised by NEVs, bicycles and pedestrians!
Nah.
That’s un-American.

Ocean Railroader

Notice how they said that the NEV’s now have to insured now it’s time for the blood sucking Changelings known as the Insurance companies to have their way with them. And charge like $200 bucks a month to insure them. Also they limited them to roads less 25 miles on hour. It really should be 35 miles on hour. In that it’s not uncommon in my area to see mopeds and other slow moving cars traveling at 25 on the four lane highways were the speed limit is 55.

I think this is more to stop the spread of EV’s. In that most roads in Pennsylvania are at 35 to 45 miles on hour or more. I wounder how the Amish get around this is they have a horse and buggies but I can’t use a slow EV?

O wait Mitsubishi invented the i-miev that is nearly the same price as a NEV but it can go at highway speeds and has double the range as a NEV. It is rated as a full car but is almost a little bigger then a NEV. So I guess they won’t stop me from driving my EV out of the neighborhood.

DaveMart

Most roads in cities in the UK now have a 20mph limit, with the more major roads at 30mph.

TomArt

Legally, I don’t know how the Amish are exempted, but they shouldn’t be permitted on some roads (Amish or NEVs). I grew up in central PA, and there are a lot of roads with blind corners and hidden driveways with high speed limits. Almost all roads, except the Interstates, are 2-lane roads, and a surprising number do not have any shoulder to speak of.

Amish are a menace because they are major traffic hazards that you can come up on very quickly without being able to see them. NEVs are no better.

Slow vehicles, of any kind, should be outlawed on any road with a speed limit higher than 35 or 40 mph. It’s not safe for everyone else on the road, and it is routinely deadly for those riding in the slow vehicles.

Ocean Railroader

The thing I find crazy about them is when your driving down US Route 30 and it’s a four to six lane wide highway and you see them at the stoplights like a normal car. Or when you see them crossing.

I wish they would make the shoulders wider like they are in Houghton Michigan. In that the roads in the UP have ten foot wide shoulders on each side bigger then most bike lanes by double.

DaveMart

So you just ignore that if there is slow moving traffic of any sort, other vehicles should limit their speed to what is safe in those conditions, not barrel on and blame it on the slow movers?

No wonder death rates driving in the US are twice that of some places in Europe.

No driver should drive faster than is safe in the prevailing traffic and road conditions.

ItsNotAboutTheMoney

If I could only drive an NEV on roads with speed limits of 25mph or less, I wouldn’t even be able to take the most direct route downtown and I wouldn’t be able to take it to shop at the local supermarkets because they’re on roads with 35mph limits.

Rick Danger

Same here, except here, they are 40-45 MPH streets 🙁

Steven

And then, they’ll have so that all EV’s will be classified as NEV’s… So, your Tesla S will be regulated to drive at no more than 25Mph.

Yeah, that’s how it works here in PA.