Over 3,300 Plug-Ins Sold In Norway In May, Market Share Stands at 25%

JUN 15 2016 BY MARK KANE 21

New plug-in passenger car registrations in Norway – May 2016

New plug-in passenger car registrations in Norway – May 2016

Nissan LEAF in Norway

Nissan LEAF in Norway

Norway’s plug-in electric car market continues to expand without hesitation.

In May, registrations of new passenger plug-ins increased by 23.4% to a total of 3,295 plug-ins, which translates to over 25% market share…an impressive feat in this day and age to be sure!

However. the sales demographics themselves seem to shifting more and more into plug-in hybrids, away from all-electrics.

All-electric registrations dropped by 23.7% to 1,423 (excluding 41 vans), while plug-in hybrids continued their surge by increasing 132% to 1,872 units.

We should note that the above numbers exclude 466 used imported passenger plug-in cars.

Here are a few individual model highlights:

  • Nissan LEAF – 320 in May and 2,274 YTD at 3.5% market share and third place overall
  • BMW i3 – 120 in May and 1,061 YTD at 1.7% market share and 11th place overall
  • Tesla Model S – 156 in May and 957 YTD at 1.5% market share and 14th place overall
  • Renault Zoe – 64 in May and 832 YTD at 1.3% market share and 16th place overall

The top selling model is the Volkswagen Golf with 1,054 cars sold in May and 6,426 YTD, which mostly consists of plug-ins, namely the e-Golf and Golf GTE.

New plug-in passenger car registrations in Norway – May 2016

New plug-in passenger car registrations in Norway – May 2016

Categories: Sales

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21 Comments on "Over 3,300 Plug-Ins Sold In Norway In May, Market Share Stands at 25%"

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That is great news for new sales.

But what is the % in terms of total vehicle on the road?

We are nearing 100k EVs (BEVs) and the total fleet is aobut 2.5 million. Right now I’d estimate we’re at about 3%.

You have to remember that even if 100% of new vehicle sales were BEVs starting tomorrow, it would take 20 years to get to 90% of the fleet being electric..! The *average* car in Norway is about 10 years old, and the average car that is being scrapped is some 17-18 years old. The average Mercedes-Benz being scrapped is a little older than that again, 19 years, and some significant percentage outlasts the average by many years.

Which is why there’s really little time to lose. The transition is urgent and takes a long time even under the best conditions!

The shift towards PHEV, partly displacing diesels and, unfortunately, partly displacing BEVs, is thanks to the change to a conservative government (the “blue-blues” as they are called over here, since it is a coalition between the “blue” conservative party and the “dark blue” progress party). Norway is giving away it’s leadership position on EV adoption by now making the same fundamental mistake as so many others have been doing – namely to incorrectly classify hybrid vehicles (even plug-in ones) as “electric vehicles”. Objectively, it is clearly no more correct to call a hybrid an EV than it is to call a hybrid a petrol/diesel car (whatever it’s other energy source may be). And it should be pretty obvious why naming things in misleading ways is a bad idea! It very easily leads to clouded thinking. Luckily even the blue-blues didn’t manage to screw up the system so badly as to completely abandon the “polluter pay” principle. So BEVs still get favorable taxes compared to all other cars, and PHEVs merely get favorable taxes compared to conventional ICE or non-chargeable(*) vehicles. I expect BEVs to increase their share again in 2017, especially if Opel Ampera-e arrives on time (Opel Norway has… Read more »

“they will disappear from the market automatically in a matter of less than a decade. I will find some comfort in watching their second-hand value crash… ?”

Are you willing to bet your life on that?

I seriously doubt it…

20-30 years is more like it…

My life isn’t worth all that much, so maybe. But what’ sthe upside? What could I win in such a bet, beyond the satisfaction of being proved correct?

I admit I’m expressing a hope more than a belief in saying PHEVs will be gone in a decade. But I do think there’s a decent chance they may be. Certainly if the rate of improvement from 2010-2020 (roughly 3x the car for slightly less money!) keeps up, by 2030 PHEVs ought to look quite ridiculous.

I guess it is possible in Norway, but certainly not in the rest of the world.

Not only in Norway, but in the rest of the world to. Even in the U.S.ofA.

The big attraction of a PHEV is a feeling of security the ICE gives people who dare not trust on the availability of electricity and charging. When people get used to electric cars and the charging infrastructure matures this attraction will fade.
What remains is a car with a limited AER and a very expensive drivetrain.

Changing a country to electric driving goes in two phases. The first phase is making electric cars affordable and creating the needed infrastructure. Like more and more countries are doing now. The second phase will be making burning gasoline unaffordable. You really don’t want to visit a gas station ten years from now in Norway or the Netherlands.

In ten years a $20k BEV with 250miles range will be a far better car then a $20k ICEV. And there will be ample second hand BOLT, Model3, Leaf-II and what more will be released the coming years to compete with these.

In that market, who will buy an old, highly complex(=failure prone) PHEV?

“he big attraction of a PHEV is a feeling of security the ICE gives people who dare not trust on the availability of electricity and charging. When people get used to electric cars and the charging infrastructure matures this attraction will fade.
What remains is a car with a limited AER and a very expensive drivetrain.”

So, you listed two factors. Range and infrastructure.

Range is easier to deal with than infrastructure. Most people over look the speed of infrastructure improvement or how slow it is.

As far as your claim that PHEV is failure prone has been proven false repeatly, yet BEV nutjobs keep repeating that crap.

Both Tesla Model S and Nissan LEAF are on the consumer report’s avoid list due to poor reliability. Yet, Volt, Prius Plugin or BMW i3 REx aren’t on the list.

There is already a 300K miles Volt with very little service required but a 150K miles LEAF already lost 48% of its battery capacity.

So, the facts say that your biased views are just wrong.

Sorry, he’s still right. As plug-in cars start to dominate the market, the infrastructure will start to weigh in favor of batteries. Gasoline stations will close, and a gasoline engine will become an expensive paperweight. This is going to tank the resale value of hybrids. I’m not quite sure when it will happen, but it’s guaranteed to happen…

“Gasoline stations will close, and a gasoline engine will become an expensive paperweight. This is going to tank the resale value of hybrids.”

Completely over optimistic view.

Typical car age in the US is over 10 years old. Those cars will continue to run and have demand on existing infrastructure.

The infrastructure to support typical EVs are non-existent today. In the US, there are no solutions yet to support people living in the Condo/apt. It will take 1-2 decades before the change takes place. Not to mention that continue growth required to support the ever increasing DCFC infrastructure.

Denying that is just being unrealistic.

Several countries are no making it clear that there will either be restrictions n ICE or it will be made economically very expensive to run an ICE.

Norway as 2025, Germany 2030 and I think there is similar idea in the Netherlands.

Vehicles with zero emission from the tailpipe will have a huge advantage in the large cities of the world. As soon as regulators see there is a viable route, they will go for low emission in the city cores.

PHEV still meets that city core restriction.

To me it seems to be within the realm of possibility, in that, as you suggest, progress in bevs continues apace most would prefer just a single source of propulsion.

Your life is worth a lot. That hurt me to read that statement.

Clearly you’re one of the EV purists who thinks “EV” means “BEV”.

The “EV” in “PHEV” means exactly the same as the “EV” in “BEV”. Both types use electric motors to propel the car, and both types are EVs.

Good luck trying to convince everyone that “EV” in “PHEV” means something different. You’ll be swimming upstream there.

And with the current state of EV tech, long-range PHEVs are more practical than BEVs for single-car families. It’s unfortunate that the Volt is the only long-range PHEV, and that only relatively so. PHEVs certainly won’t become obsolete any faster than gasmobiles, and probably not as fast as those will.

This is definitely a case of “half a loaf is better than none”. Sad to see that your attitude is one of “The perfect driving out the good.” 🙁

I agree that gasmobiles will become obsolete first, but I have already found that my BEV is more practical than a PHEV for a one-car family.

“but I have already found that my BEV is more practical than a PHEV for a one-car family.”

Sorry, you are nutjob and just as how the rest of world view us (PEV owners) too.

We are in the minorities because BEV or even PHEV aren’t perfect.

Just curious, which BEV do you own? If you drive a Model S, then don’t bother… YOu already lost your argument in terms of cost.

Also, where do you live again? Norway?

Amazing. Now granted, they do have very generous incentives. But it does show that people will switch over the EVs with the right incentive or if they are forced.

“But it does show that people will switch over the EVs with the right incentive or if they are forced.”

So, anyone can be motivated enough with the right incentives… That is just evidence that EVs can’t stand on its own.

Sadly, that’s what this article has me thinking, too. Norway has extremely high taxes on gasmobiles, up to 100% of sticker price in some cases, and still the best the market can do is a mere 25% penetration by PEVs?

How disheartening for a hopeful EV advocate like me.

Yes, it is sad.

But instead of playing the victim or insisting that EVs are ready, we should look at the reasons why.

It is because two things. 1. Gas cars have more range. 2. Gas infrastructure is here today when EV infrastructure isn’t even close to being ready.

Due to BOTH of those reason, we have a lot more to do before they will be ready.

Instead of just relying on incentives or cheerleading, we should work on the actual problem to improve that. Just “making gas more expensive” only help 1 part of the problem.

We need to build infrastructures today which won’t bare fruits for decades. But we need to start today.