NREL Evaluating Performance of Frito Lay Electric Trucks

MAY 7 2014 BY MARK KANE 2

Smith Newton

Smith Newton

National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s (NREL) Fleet Test and Evaluation Team for a few years now has been conducting performance evaluations of electric and plug-in hybrid electric drive systems in medium-duty trucks operated by fleets.

Besides the NREL’s first program, launched in 2011, on Smith and Navistar vehicles (documented here) there is a new program on Frito-Lay Electric Delivery Truck Evaluation.

This one was launched in late 2013, will take 12-months and is focused on 10 medium-duty electric vehicles and 10 comparable conventional diesel vehicles operated by Frito-Lay North America in the Seattle, Washington, area.

“The on-road portion of this 12-month evaluation, launched in 2013, focuses on collecting and analyzing vehicle performance data such as fuel economy and maintenance costs.”

“NREL is also analyzing charging data to support total cost of ownership estimations and investigations into smart charging opportunities. Smart charging takes into consideration a variety of factors—off-peak timing, driving range requirements, and other facility or utility needs—to minimize the direct and indirect costs of vehicle charging.”

Project Startup: Evaluating the Performance of Frito Lay’s Electric Delivery Trucks

Project Startup: Evaluating the Performance of Frito Lay’s Electric Delivery Trucks

Cumulative results from the first test of 259 Smith Newton Vehicle (attached below) compliment the previous report.

For example, we see 3,383,760 kWh used for 1,841,959 miles, which mean 1.84 kWh per mile.

Sadly, Smith Electric Vehicles suspended production and Navistar EVs, after the collapse of UK’s Modec, aren’t produced any more.

Smith Newton Vehicle Performance Evaluation – Cumulative

Smith Newton Vehicle Performance Evaluation – Cumulative

Source: NREL via Green Car Congress

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2 Comments on "NREL Evaluating Performance of Frito Lay Electric Trucks"

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Let the chips fall where they may!

How did the Average Daily Maximum Driving Speed of 51.6mph end up being larger than the Top Electric Speed of 50mph?

Do you have the data from the Diesel trucks so we can compare?