Nissan’s New Pedestrian Safety System Called Canto Plays Music Tied To Speed – Video

6 days ago by Inside EVs Staff 10

New pedestrian-alerting sound will be “clearly audible, without being overly disturbing.”

Nissan has revealed a new sound for its electric vehicles at the Tokyo motor show. Dubbed Canto (from the Latin for “I sing”), the sound is designed to improve pedestrian safety by providing a greater aural indication of an electric car’s presence.

Electric Cars

2018 Nissan LEAF

Nissan first created a sound for electric vehicles in 2010, with its Approaching Vehicle Sound for Pedestrians system, which was used on the Leaf electric hatchback.

Mitsubishi has a similar system fitted to its ever-popular Outlander PHEV plug-in hybrid.

The new Canto system, though, is slightly more advanced. The sound is altered when the vehicle accelerates, brakes or reverses, allowing pedestrians to build a better understanding of what the vehicles around them are doing.

In the U.K., current legislation means the sound will have to be activated at speeds of up to 19 mph (30 kph), but in some other regions the Canto system will only be emitted when the vehicle is travelling at speeds of up to 12 mph (20 kph).

Although Canto is primarily a safety system designed to alert pedestrians, Nissan has had to balance the requirements of safety with the noise pollution considerations that help to make electric vehicles appeal – particularly in an urban environment.

According to the Japanese brand, Canto was developed to “enrich the aural environment of the typical city street.” This, the company claims, has been achieved by creating a noise that will be “clearly audible, without being overly disturbing.”

“Canto has been developed to help with pedestrian safety, as well as to provide a distinct Nissan sound – one that is energising and confident, authentic to our brand and representing our unique position in the electrified marketplace,” said Daniele Schillaci, Nissan’s global head of marketing for zero-emission vehicles.

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10 responses to "Nissan’s New Pedestrian Safety System Called Canto Plays Music Tied To Speed – Video"

  1. L'amata says:

    They should put Boom Boxes in these things & shake the ground Up..Why? No Horn?….lol…

  2. SparkEV says:

    Maybe they should have EVs to have ICE in them so that they generate energy when noise is required. *rolls eyes*

    I wonder if noise is required from engine-stop systems on ICE cars.

    1. L'amata says:

      I agree , “Silence is Golden” , the other reason I want an EV…

      1. Vexar says:

        Don’t buy a Leaf. Is any other manufacturer firing up the ringtone cacophony?

        1. William says:

          Lease the Leaf, that’s the best way to stay out of the EV “rapid vehicle deprecation” game, on non thermally managed battery packs.

  3. Michael Roberts says:

    The noise sounds like something out of a horror movie!

    1. William says:

      Nissan, “Innovation that (Really) Exites”, like the frightening “cold sweat” variety!

  4. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

    “Canto was developed to “enrich the aural environment of the typical city street’.”

    This is how a PR department describes noise pollution. 😠

  5. Craigs401 says:

    I still think they should the flying car sound from “The Jetsons”. That would get people’s attention!

  6. Jason says:

    Does the 2018 Leaf have this new VPS? It would also be great to hear a sample of this when there are 10,50,100 Leaf all driving in the same urban area.
    Given ICE have spent years trying to perfect less noise, it would also be interesting to know how much noise a typical ICE generates, and how that compares to this noise.
    I really feel for blind people, but I prefer to turn my VPS off. If I’m in a busy pedestrian area then I might turn it on, but I am also much more vigilant in that situation. As autonomous cars become more common then you would think the computer is looking out for pedestrians and this system becomes less of a requirement, or more likely context sensitive: no pedestrian detected so no noise generation, when a pedestrian is detected then the noise is generated, that would be my preference. Imagine sitting in your house, there is nobody on the street (no pedestrians) but this EV noise is coming through anyway. Or imagine sitting in your house and you don’t even know there are EV’s driving by because there is no need for the noise without any actual pedestrians.
    Nissan, Innovation Without Thought!

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