Nissan Reveals LEAF e-Plus: 62 kWh Battery, 226-Mile Range

JAN 9 2019 BY MARK KANE 253

With Nissan LEAF e+ you get more of everything

Here is the long-awaited Nissan LEAF e+ with a higher capacity battery pack, more range and more power, unveiled at the 2019 CES in Las Vegas.

First, let’s start with the name – Nissan LEAF e+ is the global name for the car, but particularly in the U.S. and Canada, Nissan would like to name the top of the line version – the LEAF PLUS Series. There will be three trim levels: LEAF S PLUS, LEAF SV PLUS and LEAF SL PLUS.

Market launch plan:

  • Japan – January 2019
  • U.S. – Spring 2019 (pricing to be announced closer to on-sale date)
  • Europe – Mid-2019

62 kWh battery and 226 miles (364 km) of EPA range

The most eagerly anticipated news is about the battery and range. A few years ago we were expecting something around 60 kWh and it seems that Nissan delivered even a little more – 62 kWh, which is by the way on par with the latest competitors in its price range.

The 62 kWh of energy is 55% more than the base 40 kWh battery option (which still remains on the market). As the lithium-ion battery cells are more energy dense (25%), the pack size is almost the same as the previous one, however Nissan didn’t say anything about weight.

“Even with a 25 percent increase in energy density and the increase in energy storage capacity, the LEAF e+ battery pack is almost the same size and configuration as the pack in the Nissan LEAF. Other than a 5-millimeter increase in overall height (16-inch wheels), the car’s exterior and interior dimensions are unchanged.”

There is no word in the press release about thermal management system (liquid cooling in particular), which makes us think nothing changed from the current LEAF. Battery limited warranty is to be 8 years/160,000 km (whichever occurs first).

Because of the 55% higher capacity, the LEAF e+ is expected to get EPA range rating of about 226 miles (364 km), which is about 50% more than in the case of the 40 kWh battery version – 151 miles (243 km). The increase is then 75 miles (almost 121.7 km).

Fast charging up to 100 kW

According to Nissan, the LEAF e+ will be capable of charging at around 70 kW with a peak of 100 kW (probably at a certain state-of-charge window and temperatures).

The Japanese company encourages that when connected to 100 kW, the e+ will charge in a similar time as the base 40 kWh LEAF connected to the 50 kW charger, which is positive news.

“Thanks to the available new 70 kW (100 kW peak) Quick Charging system, the 2019 Nissan LEAF e+ can charge more efficiently than ever.*3 Based on early testing, Nissan LEAF e+ owners can expect similar charging times when hooked up to a 100 kW charger as current LEAF owners do with a 50 kW charger, despite a 55 percent larger battery storage capacity.”

160 kW electric motor

The e+ brings over a 36% increase in peak power from 110 kW to 160 kW (again on par with new mainstream BEV models). As the torque is also slightly higher, Nissan expects better acceleration, especially in the higher speed range – “50 mph (80 kph) to 75 mph (120 kph) is nearly 13 percent quicker”.

“The high-capacity battery and more powerful, 160 kW motor in the LEAF e+ combine to produce 45 percent more power and 250 lb-ft (340 Nm) of torque, enabling faster acceleration when driving at high speeds. Accelerating from 50 mph (80 kph) to 75 mph (120 kph) is nearly 13 percent quicker. This allows the LEAF e+ to confidently pass slower-moving vehicles, exit corners faster and more seamlessly, and merge easily with fast-moving traffic. The top speed has increased by approximately 10 percent for comfortable cruising.”

Design and new features

From the exterior, LEAF e+ will be almost the same as the 40 kWh LEAF, but with some small accents and “e+” logo (S PLUS, SV PLUS and SL PLUS in North America).

“The LEAF e+ carries over most of the LEAF’s design. Subtle clues to its e+ designation include a revised front fascia with blue highlights and an “e+” logo plate on the underside of the charge port lid.

There will also be a rear trim level badge for U.S. and Canada which will be designated as S PLUS, SV PLUS and SL PLUS.

Like the standard model, the LEAF e+ boasts a spacious, highly functional interior with a quality, high-tech feel. The combination of premium materials throughout the cabin befits a luxury vehicle. Vibrant blue contrast stitching for the steering wheel, seats and instrument panel accentuate the car as a Nissan electric vehicle.”

Among changes Nissan mentions a very important upgrade to a larger and more responsive touchscreen with an updated navigation system:

  • “New for the LEAF e+ (on North American and EU models) is a larger, thin-film transistor, full-color 8-inch display, with an updated navigation system that can be linked to a compatible smartphone. The display features smartphone-like operation including swiping, scrolling and tapping. Applications, maps and firmware are updated over the air with the simple touch of a button, instead of having to manually update by USB or at a Nissan dealership.*5
  • Other new features include Door-to-Door Navigation, which syncs the vehicle’s navigation system with your compatible smartphone for seamless driving and walking directions. The Connections feature allows any of the car’s passengers to quickly and easily connect to a device within the vehicle.*6

5 The new navigation system for the European market can also have its software and maps updated via Inter vehicle communication (IVC) systems.

6 These new features are available on North America and EU models only.”

Nissan LEAF remains the best-selling electric car in history with more than 380,000 sales since 2010 (including over 128,000 in the U.S.). The time will tell whether e+ will enable the LEAF to stay on top a few years from now. A lot depends on prices.

Denis Le Vot, senior vice president and chairman, Nissan North America said:

“The new Nissan LEAF e+ offers all of the style, convenience and electric vehicle benefits that have helped make LEAF the best-selling electric vehicle in the world, plus even more driving excitement, range, power and choice,” said . “Customers now have a selection of powertrains and models to best suit their driving needs.”

“Nissan Intelligent Mobility is at the core of everything we do and the new Nissan LEAF e+ takes this vision even further. EV’s will play a significant part in our product lineup as we move forward and will lead the way to providing an efficient and sustainable future for the world.”

Nissan LEAF e+ specs (vs. LEAF 40 kWh)

  • 62 kWh battery (+55% capacity over 40 kWh, 25% more energy dense lithium-ion cells, similar size)
  • battery limited warranty of 8 years/160,000 km (whichever occurs first) is standard
  • 226 miles (364 km) of expected EPA range (up 50% from 151 miles)
  • 160 kW electric motor (up from 110 kW) and 250 lb-ft (340 Nm) (vs. 320 Nm in 40 kWh version)
  • 70 kW (100 kW peak) Quick Charging system (vs. less than 50 kW)
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More in the press release:

Nissan LEAF e+ joins world’s best-selling electric vehicle family

New powertrain option offers expanded range and power

LAS VEGAS, Nevada (Jan. 8, 2018) – Nissan today unveiled the Nissan LEAF e+, further broadening the appeal of the world’s best-selling electric car*1 by offering a new powertrain with additional power and range.

The “e+” refers to the increased energy density of the model’s 62 kWh battery pack and the higher output of its powertrain. The new powertrain adds to the car’s range by approximately 40 percent, with EPA-estimated range of up to 226 miles, ensuring that there’s a Nissan LEAF to meet the driving needs of a wider range of customers.

“The new Nissan LEAF e+ offers all of the style, convenience and electric vehicle benefits that have helped make LEAF the best-selling electric vehicle in the world, plus even more driving excitement, range, power and choice,” said Denis Le Vot, senior vice president and chairman, Nissan North America. “Customers now have a selection of powertrains and models to best suit their driving needs.”

The LEAF e+ will be sold under the LEAF PLUS Series in the US and Canada, with each trim level receiving its own designation of S PLUS, SV PLUS and SL PLUS. Globally, the vehicle will be referred to as the Nissan LEAF e+.  

More than 380,000 Nissan LEAF vehicles have been sold globally since the 100 percent electric model first went on sale in 2010, with over 128,000 sold in the US. Equipped with advanced technologies including ProPILOT Assist semi-autonomous driving system and e-Pedal mode for one-pedal driving, the LEAF embodies Nissan Intelligent Mobility, the company’s vision for changing how cars are powered, driven and integrated into society.

“Nissan Intelligent Mobility is at the core of everything we do and the new Nissan LEAF e+ takes this vision even further,” Le Vot continued. “EV’s will play a significant part in our product lineup as we move forward and will lead the way to providing an efficient and sustainable future for the world.”

Having pioneered mass-market electric cars with the LEAF, Nissan is continuing to promote alternative vehicle transportation. The LEAF family of cars play a vital role in Nissan’s efforts to integrate electric vehicles and energy systems into customer’s lives – creating an “EV ecosystem.” Among these efforts is Nissan Energy, the company’s initiative for its electric vehicles to easily connect with energy systems to charge their batteries, power homes and businesses, or feed energy back to power grids, as well as new efforts to reuse batteries.*2

The Nissan LEAF PLUS Series is scheduled to join the LEAF at Nissan dealerships in Japan in January 2019. U.S. sales are expected to begin in spring 2019 and European sales to commence in mid-2019.

Nissan Intelligent Mobility

The Nissan LEAF e+ represents a step forward in each of the three key areas of the Nissan Intelligent Mobility vision: Intelligent Power, Intelligent Driving and Intelligent Integration.

  • Nissan Intelligent Power: increased range and performance

The Nissan LEAF e+ features a new version of the LEAF’s revolutionary electric powertrain, delivering excellent energy efficiency and robust torque and power output. While the current LEAF meets the needs of many customers with its driving range of EPA-estimated 150 miles, the LEAF e+ offers an EPA-estimated range of up to 226 miles, allowing customers the ability to do more between charges.*3

The high-capacity battery and more powerful, 160 kW motor in the LEAF e+ combine to produce 45 percent more power and 250 lb-ft (340 Nm) of torque, enabling faster acceleration when driving at high speeds. Accelerating from 50 mph (80 kph) to 75 mph (120 kph) is nearly 13 percent quicker. This allows the LEAF e+ to confidently pass slower-moving vehicles, exit corners faster and more seamlessly, and merge easily with fast-moving traffic. The top speed has increased by approximately 10 percent for comfortable cruising.

Thanks to the available new 70 kW (100 kW peak) Quick Charging system, the 2019 Nissan LEAF e+ can charge more efficiently than ever.*3 Based on early testing, Nissan LEAF e+ owners can expect similar charging times when hooked up to a 100 kW charger as current LEAF owners do with a 50 kW charger, despite a 55 percent larger battery storage capacity.

Even with a 25 percent increase in energy density and the increase in energy storage capacity, the LEAF e+ battery pack is almost the same size and configuration as the pack in the Nissan LEAF. Other than a 5-millimeter increase in overall height (16-inch wheels), the car’s exterior and interior dimensions are unchanged.

Because ownership satisfaction and peace of mind are pivotal for all Nissan LEAF owners, the battery limited warranty of 8 years/160,000 km (whichever occurs first) is standard for all versions.

  • Nissan Intelligent Driving: innovative ProPILOT features and smooth e-Pedal operation

Playing a leading role in Nissan Intelligent Driving is ProPILOT Assist, an in-lane semi-autonomous driving technology that can automatically adjust the distance to the vehicle ahead, using a speed preset by the driver (between about 18 mph and 62 mph). ProPILOT Assist can also help the driver steer and keep the vehicle centered in its lane. If the car in front stops, ProPILOT Assist can automatically apply the brakes to bring the vehicle to a full halt if necessary. After coming to a full stop, the vehicle can remain in place even if the driver’s foot is off the brake. If traffic restarts, the car will resume driving when the driver touches the steering wheel-mounted ProPILOT Assist switch again or lightly presses the accelerator to activate the system. All these functions can reduce stress when driving on the highway in both heavy and fast-moving traffic.

Further enhancing the LEAF’s driving experience is e-Pedal, which allows the driver to start, accelerate, decelerate and stop using only the accelerator pedal.*4 To match the LEAF e+’s additional power and increased mass, Nissan has reprogrammed the e-Pedal software for smoother operation and enhanced pedal feedback, especially for operation in reverse, and for smoother and more rapid deceleration, making it easier to stop the car using e-Pedal, even when backing up.

In addition to ProPILOT and e-Pedal, every LEAF is equipped with advanced safety technologies including Intelligent Lane Intervention, Lane Departure Warning, Intelligent Emergency Braking, Blind Spot Warning, Rear Cross Traffic Alert and Intelligent Around View Monitor with moving object detection.

  • Nissan Intelligent Integration: updated interface, larger display and convenient updates

The new Nissan LEAF links drivers, vehicles and communities through its convenient graphic-based Human Machine Interface. It allows the owner to use the NissanConnect smartphone app to perform tasks such as monitoring the vehicle’s state of charge, scheduling charging to benefit from optimal energy tariffs, finding the nearest charging station, and heating or cooling the car before getting in.

New for the LEAF e+ (on North American and EU models) is a larger, thin-film transistor, full-color 8-inch display, with an updated navigation system that can be linked to a compatible smartphone. The display features smartphone-like operation including swiping, scrolling and tapping. Applications, maps and firmware are updated over the air with the simple touch of a button, instead of having to manually update by USB or at a Nissan dealership.*5

Other new features include Door-to-Door Navigation, which syncs the vehicle’s navigation system with your compatible smartphone for seamless driving and walking directions. The Connections feature allows any of the car’s passengers to quickly and easily connect to a device within the vehicle.*6

Integration goes beyond what’s in the vehicle and now includes Nissan Energy, the company’s existing and future initiatives for Vehicle-to-Grid, Vehicle-to-Building and Vehicle-to-Home connections, generating solar electricity, as well as reusing batteries. With Nissan Energy, LEAF vehicles are part of a larger electric vehicle ecosystem.*2

Sleek, modern design

One of the most eye-catching exterior elements of the new Nissan LEAF is the car’s sleek, streamlined silhouette, which maximizes aerodynamic efficiency. The car’s bold fascia features Nissan’s signature V-Motion grille with blue 3D mesh. The car’s streamlined profile gives it a sporty look, while the rear features a distinctive tail light design.

The LEAF e+ carries over most of the LEAF’s design. Subtle clues to its e+ designation include a revised front fascia with blue highlights and an “e+” logo plate on the underside of the charge port lid.

There will also be a rear trim level badge for U.S. and Canada which will be designated as S PLUS, SV PLUS and SL PLUS.

Like the standard model, the LEAF e+ boasts a spacious, highly functional interior with a quality, high-tech feel. The combination of premium materials throughout the cabin befits a luxury vehicle. Vibrant blue contrast stitching for the steering wheel, seats and instrument panel accentuate the car as a Nissan electric vehicle.

Pricing

North America pricing will be announced closer to on-sale date.

 

About Nissan North America 

In North America, Nissan’s operations include automotive styling, engineering, consumer and corporate financing, sales and marketing, distribution and manufacturing. Nissan is dedicated to improving the environment under the Nissan Green Program and has been recognized annually by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as an ENERGY STAR® Partner of the Year since 2010. More information on Nissan in North America and the complete line of Nissan and INFINITI vehicles can be found online at www.nissanusa.com and www.infinitiusa.com, or visit the U.S. media sites nissannews.com and infinitinews.com.

About Nissan Motor Co., Ltd.
Nissan is a global full-line vehicle manufacturer that sells more than 60 models under the Nissan, INFINITI and Datsun brands. In fiscal year 2017, the company sold 5.77 million vehicles globally, generating revenue of 11.9 trillion yen. On April 1, 2017, the company embarked on Nissan M.O.V.E. to 2022, a six-year plan targeting a 30 percent increase in annualized revenues to 16.5 trillion yen by the end of fiscal 2022, along with cumulative free cash flow of 2.5 trillion yen. As part of Nissan M.O.V.E. to 2022, the company plans to extend its leadership in electric vehicles, symbolized by the world’s best-selling all-electric vehicle in history, the Nissan LEAF. Nissan’s global headquarters in Yokohama, Japan, manages operations in six regions: Asia & Oceania; Africa, the Middle East & India; China; Europe; Latin America; and North America. Nissan has partnered with French manufacturer Renault since 1999 and acquired a 34 percent stake in Mitsubishi Motors in 2016. Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi is today the world’s largest automotive partnership, with combined sales of more than 10.6 million vehicles in calendar year 2017.

For more information about our products, services and commitment to sustainable mobility, visit
nissan-global.com. You can also follow us on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and LinkedIn and see all our latest videos on YouTube.

*1 Based on cumulative sales data from December 2010 to December 2018.

*2 Availability of features and components vary by geographic region.

*3 Targeted range estimates for LEAF S PLUS only; subject to appropriate regulator confirmation. Actual range will vary with trim levels, options and driving conditions; see Customer Disclosure Form for details. Charging capacity may vary based on battery temperature.

*4 Those who prefer conventional driving can still make full use of both the accelerator and brake pedals.

*5 The new navigation system for the European market can also have its software and maps updated via Inter vehicle communication (IVC) systems.

*6 These new features are available on North America and EU models only.

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253 Comments on "Nissan Reveals LEAF e-Plus: 62 kWh Battery, 226-Mile Range"

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So two answers pending: cooling system? and CCS for Europe?

And price….

no ccs. Price 36,000 or so GBP for entry oh and cooling Air. And batteries I believe are now LG Chem, so probably different chemistry than AESC so most likely better for heat tolerances.

If you watch Nyland video, Leaf in -7C temperature shot up to 47C when fast charging the second time and power was 25 kW. Driving at 90 km/h in -7C only brought it down to 35C. If you imagine 20C ambient (spring weather), the battery will be cooking at 74C even with 50 kW charger. With 40C ambient (typical summer over asphalt), it will really cook at 94C if charged with 50 kW.

Without active cooling (likely, liquid is needed), I doubt 100kW or even 50kW is meaningful.

The at some point the rumour mill was saying that the Leaf Plus would have forced air cooling, which would already be a huge step forward. The Ioniq uses forced air, IIRC, and it can charge reliably (and repeatedly) at almost 3C!

Ioniq uses refrigerated air and pack was designed as such, probably fins to increase surface area for cooling. Leaf being only few mm larger than 40 kWh pack, I don’t think they did much, if any.

Time and testing will tell, but given the numbers so far, it’s not looking good.

4,162,320 Yen and 4,729,320 Yen including tax.

If true, that’s $38.2K to $43.4K at current exchange rate of 109 yen to usd.

The Japanese price includes a 10% Consumption Tax i.e. VAT.

not likely having cooling spaces if the pack is similar size despite the improvement in cell density.

pack is slightly bigger 5-millimeter increase in overall height

Pretty sure the 16″ tires instead of 15″ tire, made the whole car 5 mm taller, not the Battery Pack, how I Read it!

What 15 inch tire? Leaf has had 16 inch wheels since the beginning, still comes standard with 16 inch in US on S trim level, 17 inch wheels on SV and SL trim.

Wheel size mention in the article is somewhat odd statement as overall tire diameter is a better indicator vs wheel diameter…

My LEAF S (2015) with its 16″ wheels had a slightly different tire radius than the stock 17″ wheels! The speedometer read ~5% fast with the 16″ wheels. When I moved to standard 17″ wheels/tires, the speedometer was about perfect. A good way to artificially shorten warranty too… 🙁

Air cooling system, like Nissan ev-200. Is quite better than 40 kwh Leaf, but itsn’t a liquid cooling system. We’ll see how it works.

The power is a good surprise.

Hardly a surprise. The motor-controller on the 40kwhr trim could plausibly be rated for 50%ish more output than the pack puts out on the regular–meaning both 40 and 60 trims could plausibly share the same drive hardware.

Most important question for everyone who use DCFC. Leaf or otherwise: will they continue to offer free charging? Based on Nyland findings and no cooling on Leaf, you can be sure the Leaf will continue to suck at charging.

Free charging SUCKS!!!!!

Do Not Read Between The Lines

Things I was expecting:
1) Multiple people to write that it needs active liquid cooling
2) Multiple people to write that CHAdeMO is dead and that it should have CCS instead.
3) The conspiracy theorists who were writing that the long-range Leaf wouldn’t be sold to say nothing
4) BoltSV to write that free charging sucks

Those things are all obvious points.

1. Based on thermal data from Nyland, it’s pretty clear Leaf needs active liquid cooling to have average charge power anywhere close to 50 kW, let alone 70 kW. Peak power means nothing when thermal is the limit.

2. From growth perspective, Chademo is practically dead in US.

3. Without decent TMS along with competition from Hyundai/Kia let alone Tesla and GM, Leaf will not sell many, especially with high price tag due to bigger battery.

4. Free charging SUCKS!!!!!!!!!!!

Probably no for CCS. Cooling I believe will still be passive maybe with fan(s) for air cooling.

Cooling is indeed passive like the other models. But the Batteries are from LG and they are a bit better on use.

Lets not forget, since the early days 8 years ago, larger capacity (and more cells in parallel) make for a more gently used battery in the long run, sharing the load more throughout. Using a 50kW DC could in theory produce less heat and strain than for the 40kWhs and less so for say the 24kWh LEAFs, right?

It doesn’t help quell anxieties about long summer trips, but maybe the longer gap in range between recharges is enough to avoid overheating?

Bjorn’s videos tend to show that the battery heats up during highway driving as well as during charging, so I doubt the longer intervals will help much.

Also, are there more cells in parallel? Is there a source for that? Because if the cells have 25% more energy capacity then there isn’t really a way to take a 96s2p pack like the 40kWh Leaf’s and add a string to end up with a 155% increase. I don’t understand how they’ve done it, because if the cells only account for 25% of the increase then you still need 1.24 times as many cells in series to get to 62kWh, which would increase the pack voltage all the way up to 500V. That would be great for fast charging, but they did say that it would charge at the same speed on a 50kW charger, implying that the pack voltage hasn’t changed. Maybe they got the rest of the increase by reducing the lower SOC buffer? With a big pack you could assume fewer excursions to extremely low SOCs, but was there really a 24% buffer down there that they could sacrifice?

Latest video on “rapidgate fixed” shows driving at -7C slowly decreases the temperature from 47C to about 37C over hour. That might mean the thermal conductivity + heat generation during driving result in about 40C above ambient.

I think it’s a function of temperature gradient and current draw. I watched that video too, and if I recall correctly he was doing a pretty tame 90km/h. I think at 120 the differential would be a good bit higher. Also, I’d rather not have to rely on -7° weather in order to not have my car overheat 😉

Thats what i think too. Only once charging ins needed for all ways below 700km/430miles. Who drives more than 400 miles very often?

They’ve said as much by not saying anything, or indicating in their blurbs, that it doesn’t need it. Mores the pity.
Love your shows btw. A pioneer.

Which shows are you referring to?

Bravo, now get it to the dealers!

Outstanding. The more, and more variations of “serious” EVs on the market, the better.

Glad I didn’t wait around and instead bought a Model 3 (coming from a 2014 Leaf owner).

good move — I did the same!

Leaf Plus vs Base Model 3, will be an interesting comparison, when it happens!

The only advantage I can see over Tesla, is Nissan will lease you one and they still have $7500 available. Nissan had better come out with some good leases. Their leases have absolutely sucked as of late, and the dealers are simply horrible to deal with.

The car is way cheaper than the model 3, it seems around $10k cheaper, in the US with the tax credit even more.
$10k is a big chunk of money!

Model 3 @ $35,000 Base Model, will put pressure on the Leaf Plus S, and the Model 3 with Premium Upgrade @ $40,000 will challenge the Leaf Pkus SV and SL Models, no doubt!

When Model 3 @ $35000 is available … LEAF price will be revised… No doubt on this either.

There will probably never be the $35,000 base model. EEStor will have their super capacitor commercial before Tesla has the base model to the public.

Hahahah, $35k Model 3! Good one! ROFL!

I put down my deposit for the M3 $35k model on day 2, waited. Was lied to by Elon while he pocketed the interest on my deposit and gave it to the rich M3 long range buyers. I cancelled my deposit, got my Volt instead, and have been driving 80% electric since. Seriously, get a Bolt instead of the Leaf Plus. Bolt has proven performance and quality, liquid cooling, the battery will hold much longer !

Jean-Baptiste Labelle

Tesla is also leasing is also leasing the Model III, at least in Europe.

France, Germany, Norway and Netherlands?

American consumers seem to be incredibly lucky now. 2019 will full fill every pre-order and it seems all too likely for the US market to be further serviced before taking the 3 internationally and beyond at a mass scale.

But still, for the rest of us the LEAF would still be the “better” or easier option.. The Model 3 is not going to become RHD anytime soon, and it’s not a hatch back, both big downsides of European markets like IRE and UK – the latter where the LEAF is made.

But then again, brexit is arriving before the LEAF will, so…

The RHD Model 3 and the Leaf in Europe probably arrive within 3 months of each other.

Why order a hamburger when you are offered steak, although it is cheaper.
Wise decision. I think in every term imaginable, except for price, you made a better deal.

“Why order a hamburger when you are offered steak, although it is cheaper”

Is that why so many fast food are still open? Because people just don’t want steaks?

Cost matters.

There’s way too much elitism around here. Not everyone can afford a $50K car. This sort of snobbish behavior is not going to engender much good will for EVs.

So Nissan still has interest in Leaf. Next important point is the price. Spring launch means between Mar-21 to Jun-20.
They cannot price it above $36K since Niro EV has that price.
Let’s see.

Just to put up some good face before the World, they brought Mr. Carlos Ghosn to court.
I hope they release him and give a fair trial.

I see $34k as selling price for a base

Sure they can, since Niro EV is probably made in very limited number. .
Hope I’m wrong though.

Meh,… no liquid cooling.

True, but it’s cheaper. And unlike the Tesla 3, or the new VW I.D prototypes, there’s no gunk and adhesive involved in the battery packs. The LEAF like all the others should still be easy to put together and take apart in the future.

And if it still chills itself the same way an iPad does, at least would a bigger pack with more cells spreading the load, stressing itself less not potentially lessen heat build up? – I’m also saying this from living in a temperate climate. LEAFs and owners in Arizona, SoCal and Spain be damned.

You should watch this video. Leaf charged in -7C ambient shot up to 47C battery temperature even using 50 kW charger (of course, tapered under 25kW by 47C). Ipad cooling does not work in Leaf even in -7C ambient, let alone 20C (spring) or 40C (typical summer over asphalt).

https://youtu.be/J92fS73qw8c?t=883

Yeah. . But over 90% of all charging ( at least in Norway) is done at home or work (slow charging), so for people that does not live in a semi desert area will probably do fine.
Others may have to choose another brand, with a cooling system developed to handle more extreme temperatures, and multiple fast charges.

In SoCal, many Leaf drivers charge at DCFC 90% of the time (it’s free, home charging is not). Some start at 90% SoC when plugging in trying to achieve 100% at DCFC while wasting theirs and everyone else’s time.

“The LEAF like all the others should still be easy to put together and take apart in the future.”

Yea, which makes them the battery of choice after people wreck them. Our shop is littered with them.

Very true. I know one man who’s plannimg to EV retrofit their 60s Land Rover with a wrecked 2013 LEAF in another country. He’s on his second replacement BMW-LandRover 2.0l turbo diesel from the late 90s, and he’s betting that one will grenade on him soon.

Living in Seattle, I’ve never had trouble because of the air cooled battery but I don’t think the rest of this thread will like this bit of news.

It’s specifically made for Seattle. In Cali they sell it under the name of Tesla Model 3.

Yeah. I live in central Texas so, put me in under ‘the rest of this thread.’ Seattle’s summer is my winter.

Living in Seattle I 🐢 moded several times in my 2013 Lead while highway driving over Snoqualmie pass.

Yes the Leaf battery absolutely sucks —- I have never hit 🐢 mode, but the cold kills miles super fast over the pass and the 2nd quick charge is completely limited.

In bitter, Washington cold, ignoring the remote cabin warming, does force charging to 100% help retain an above ambient temperature? I know that below 10C, most batteries, NiMH and particularly Li-ion are too cold to operate fully with too high of an internal cell resistance, risking itself more to capacity loss than at baking temperatures.

I believe that it is technically water-cooled (as is everything else) living in Seattle.

It would be very disappointing if this new Leaf doesn’t have a thermal management system.
Air cool is totally inadequate.

no liquid, air

Air cooling can be adequate for the use, if done….properly.

Also, I think Batteries are now LG Chem. So different chemistry and probably will be better for heat tolerances. So this with Air cooling, slightly bigger battery housing and still somewhat limited DCFCing (mainly at 70kW but can peak to 100kW – so this to me means still some throttling to avoid heat). I also think it will all work fine, and still has 8-year 100,000 mile (160,000km) 66% SOH warranty.

8 year /100K miles on 62kWh battery is much worse than the same 8yr/100K miles on the 40kWh battery since it will be cycled more under the same usage.

Well still a warranty!

I think you have it backwards. The larger battery will be cycled less.

Exactly, so the 62kWh should have a longer warranty, all things being equal.
(i.e., I think MMF had it right, but worded it poorly — i.e., “it”.)

The Leaf 2.0 (40 KWh gross, 37 KWh net/usable) battery was/is also from LG Chem, only the Leaf-1.0 (24 KWH net/usable) and Leaf 1.1 (30 KWH net/usable) were from their own AESC battery factory.

Are you sure? Source?

I don’t think so. For the 40-kwh batteries, Nissan developed a new nickel-manganese spinel cell that is designed in part to reduce capacity loss. Still AESC. For the new Eplus, it’s LG Chem.

Yeah – you are right, there was sooooo much talk about Nissan of using now LG-Chem cells, that I assumed it’s already for the current Leaf 2.0 (40 KWh gross, 37 KWh net/usable) pack, especially as LG as external supplier was mentioned as the reason of the “rapidgate” as Nissan now has to take care more of the packs.

According to an earlier article https://insideevs.com/nissan-leaf-40-kwh-battery-deep-dive/ it’s indeed still AESC cells for the Leaf 2.0 but NMC instead earlier LMO .

Do Not Read Between The Lines

No. The 40kWh is theirs. Tried to sell the manufacturing to a Chinese company but the company pulled out.

Now all the dealers in SoCal that want $15k+ for a 3 year lease on the base Leaf can go ….hide themselves.
Time to drop the price, suckers!

YES, and that’s what I’ve been saying for many months. Even if you want the old Leaf (I don’t know why), wait for 60kWh announcement for the best deal. With low slow car sales these days, there will be even better deals.

I can tell you why…first, 150 miles is more than enough even for one car household …then why care about cooling on a lease….and price!
How is that for “why”?

At $10k total lease i would be all over this!…i have no interest in the 60.

You care about cooling on lease, because DCFC charging will slow down due to heat. Even in sub arctic temperature where Nyland lives, it hits 47C, imagine summer in SoCal.

Yes, on the second charge. If i need to go 300+ miles there is no way i will not fly.

You should watch Nyland video. Second DCFC was severely affected, but just driving at 90 km/hr kept the temperature almost 40C above ambient of -7C. After 100 miles at 120 km/hr in summer, you won’t be happy even with first DCFC.

You can get a Bolt for around $10K. Why would you even consider the 40 kwh Leaf for that amount?

Better seats, Propilot and more room.

The Bolt has better range (238 miles).

yes slightly. I think what may help Nissan here is the boot space, it is pretty big for its class. Also pro pilot is actually very very good. I use it a lot and it works well. E-pedal is also a very nice feature that once you try it for a bit, you tend to use it all the time. I do. We will see.

Do Not Read Between The Lines

Bolt has one-pedal driving as well. It’s also quicker and clearly more efficient.

And the LEAF has seats you actually want to sit in (“Zero Gravity” seats).

Yes, basically Bolt EV has 9% better range taking into account battery pack size difference.

That translates to efficiency. Efficiency is more miles per kWh. That means given a time at charger (DCFC), you get more miles, in effect quicker charging. Even if Leaf can charge at same average power (unlikely based on Nyland video), Bolt is effectively charging about 10% quicker.

Kinda surprised by this, as I would expect the Leaf to have better aero dynamics, so better efficiency. Given that the more boxy Kona, Niro and Bolt get more for ~60kWh its a little odd, may be a surprise waiting in spring.

Jean-Baptiste Labelle

Let’s how highway range at 120-130km/h looks like… My guess is that the Leaf will be better or as good as the Kona / Bolt / Niro.

For the Kona and Niro it seems to be 64 kWh usable (I read 67 kWh gross size several times). Nevertheless they still may be a bit more efficient.

They are different size class vehicles. The Bolt and Kona are similar size, and slightly larger than a Honda Fit. The Leaf has the size of a Honda Civic hatchback, and actually it’s a bit taller.

They are all close enough to see some cross shopping, but you are right, Niro and Leaf are more similar in size and Kona and Bolt EV. However, Bolt EV has a shorter front on it so less wasted space than a Leaf, Kona, or Niro, so actually has more space behind the front seats than Leaf, Niro, or Kona. This is mostly air space due to the tall ceiling, so might not be that meaningful, but still worth noting.

This space use is true, but I think of it as safety space. When the rear passenger’s head is less than an arms length to the rear window, what happens in a rear end collision. The have been some real serious collisions with Prius C sized vehicles and the Prius doesn’t do well against the trucks like that.

The Bolt EV also lacks several features of the class like adaptive cruise (I won’t buy a car without that feature).

I really don’t care about that feature.

If you have never tried it, you don’t really understand the benefits. If you only tried it once (like on a test drive), it can be a little unnerving. If you have tried that feature extensively and still don’t care, you’re an outlier.

That statement applies to one pedal driving also.

That is perfectly fine, but it will limit sales of the Bolt EV if they don’t have options competitors do, options that people want.

Have you actually used a car with adaptive cruise control with low speed follow (say for 3 months of use)? It is really nice to just set cruise control and follow a safe distance from the car in front.

Of any of the driver assist features, this is by far my favorite. As I said, I wouldn’t buy a car without this feature again. I am not the only one with this line of thinking.

Well, my 2010 Kia Soul has “Adaptive Cruise”, I “Adapt” it to traffic Flows! It’s just not “Automatic!”
/S

“I won’t buy a car without that feature”

Yea, I won’t buy a car without ashtrays (and I don’t even smoke).

You lost me with this comment. Ashtray vs ACC?

As an aside, major auto suppliers such as Continental and ZF will begin offering the newest Nvidia autopilot system in 2020. Tesla Autopilot currently uses the older generation of Nvidia hardware, so now any company can incorporate a similar system into their vehicles. This will end up being far better than the current fixed systems of today.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/samabuelsamid/2019/01/07/nvidia-launches-nearly-complete-drive-autopilot-package-with-zf-and-continental/#3d3529fba7f5

The Bolt has CCS, which is less found where I broadly live.

Bolt also has TMS, more headroom, and available now.

i think this just keeps the Leaf from being obsolete by giving it the base acceptable range on 200+ miles. Model 3 will set the bar at $35k at that range. Now Nissan has to work on styling that looks like $35k instead of $20k. Tesla is still the only automaker who gets that.

Styling is subjective, I know many who love the new Leaf looks and hate the model 3, and vice versa.

True, but actual sales numbers tell the story. Leaf sales are on average 47,500 annually since 2010. Model 3 sold about 130k for 2018 alone.

It also may be time for the Leaf to evolve with a new name with a more premium design so it can move more mainstream, instead of a greenie car, like Prius who’s sales continue to dive.

Btw….is Tesla able to sell cars in Japan?

Not sure if Japan is open for Tesla yet, yes no doubt Model 3 is killing it. I still would not compare the two. Maybe base model 3 if that ever arrives. Tesla is more software than auto, which is good for many and some don’t like it. However, they have brand now and Supercharging, which is still king. Leaf can fit many who are worried about post-sales repair costs, parts, etc. for Tesla which is expensive.

However like you said, sales tells the story and Model 3 will continue to go nuts. However remember, Leaf is still number 1 single model BEV globally by sales – over 380,000 now.

The Leaf should hold out a little longer as the “number 1 single model BEV globally by sales”. The Tesla Model 3 should start to run close to neck and neck, with the Leaf in Global sales, somewhere about this time next year.

This should be an Interesting year ahead, as wider BEV adoption, and anticipated higher EV sales volume in 2020, approaches.

I keep my cars well past warranty because I hate car payments. Tesla parts are expensive and have a history of more major part replacements than the Leaf. Only the Tesla battery will be superior for longer life.

I am betting the larger battery in the Leaf will overall have a longer auto life and will have to wait until they price it. Also the Nissan dealers have free fast charging here in Hawaii.

Even better yet, Hawaii is not a very large state, so it’s not like road trips will result in lots of rapid charging….

Since the Leaf Sales began in 2010, and Model 3 sales only in 2017, at the current Ramp up of Model 3 Sales and Deliveries, the Leaf won’t be the Leader for much longer, as Tesla gets Europe & China Sales starting in Q1! Unless this Plus Model doubles average sales, of 47,500 a year!

Yes Tesla has been available in Japan since the original Roadster, they have stores at least in two places Tokyo and Osaka. Plus a few super chargers around the country.

They have 4 now; Nagoya and Kawasaki in addition to Tokyo and Osaka.

Selling non Japanese cars in Japan is pretty damn hard. For ANYONE. The top selling non Japanese brand gets like 19% of the market.

2018 sells for the Leaf worldwide should be about 90 000 units. Knowing that the Leaf 2 only arrived in April or after for several countries. It’s not bad imho.

Well, I am sure if Nissan took initiative to get more CHAdeMO chargers installed(this is easy, just install the 50kW CCS+CHAdeMO ones, and let everyone charge) AND advertised them just like their gas ones(emphasizing the 226 mile range, rapid charging and the low price), they would sell really well.

Essentially, they have to put the car on a level playing field with their gas ones. Also, shine the spotlight on the instant 250lb-ft of torque.

There are 5 things people worry about in an EV, range, charging time, charger availability, price, and speed. If you tackle all of those, you will sell cars, that’s why Tesla is successful, because they use their brains, and know what people want.

I’m sure there are some that prefer the LEAF. But I suspect very few.

$35k vaporware is not going to set any bars until it’s reality.

The 62kWh Leaf isn’t available yet either.

There is no Model 3 at $35K. Maybe someday, but not anytime soon.

There is no Leaf with 62kWh . Maybe someday, but not anytime soon.

Do Not Read Between The Lines

Targeted for May in European markets.

I am a bit disappointed that it has been almost 3 years waiting for the car that was widely adverised with the magic number $35k. Whereas Nissan, you can order the 62kWh almost instantly after release, worldwide.

That said i’m really looking forward for the Y, and i have plenty of time to wait driving my 40kWh Leaf (sorry, got tired of waiting for the $35k Model 3..)

Indeed.

So, is this the “LOWEST” 200+ miles range sub $40K vehicle on the market?

Way to aim high, Nissan…

How did Hyundai/Kia beat you to the range game?

All things considered i’d rather get a Leaf than either of the Koreans. If i were to compare with not yet existing bare bones $35k Model 3 and Leaf 60kWh, i’m not sure which one i would get, unless of course i had to order now.

Exactly, the Kona/Niro are nice, but not going to be sold in my market (Iowa, no, not going to order one with no battery heater and no real local support).

So of the Bolt EV, Leaf, Niro, and Kona about $40k compact hatchbacks I can buy Leaf or Bolt EV locally. The Leaf would get my pick because it has adaptive cruise. Model 3 standard would get my pick over either as Superchargers are more plentiful here and I want Autopilot.

I don’t think the Leaf or Bolt have battery heaters?

The old Leaf and Bolt EV both have battery heating.

Both do.

Well, you could buy a CPO Tesla S60, for $35,000 right now…. It has 208 miles of range, but it also has Supercharger access, it’s got better performance, AND it’s battery will likely last far longer than the Leaf

If it came with CCS we could actually use the greater than 50kw charging… but last I checked, Chademo has the best established network for DCFC but it’s a dead man walking in the USA too. Each Electrify America (VW dieslgate penalty charger stations) is getting one (1x) 50kw Chademo and umpteen CCS @ 100kw or more. How is this car supposed to compete with even a $40k TM3?

Yeah. If Nissan can really get the sales moving on this car, such as 4,000 per month or more, that would help solidify Chademo as a more long-term option. But I just don’t see it happening.

They can sell an adapter

Do Not Read Between The Lines

And there’s the first one…

The CHAdeMO rollout was significantly supported by Nissan. They’d just have to continue doing it.

The two key questions un answered and I need a battery heater before I need cooling, win goes to everyone else while Nissan becomes a foot note.

Every LEAF with the exception of the 2011 has had a heater. It’s unlikely they will delete this feature. It only prevents no-start scenarios due to extreme cold, it doesn’t handle “conditioning”.

With the only 50kW+ ChadeMO chargers in the USA being available at Electrify America sites (and even that is available at only 1/4 or 1/6 of the stalls where a CCS vehicle could also be occupying it), I think the choice of charging standard now with the next generation of charging networks coming out is a poor choice for the US market.

50kw are upgradeable

Yea, upgradeable to CCS.

yeah, should have been CCS for North America to be competitive.

Not to mention every EA site only has *1* CHAdeMO plug, while there may be up to 15-19 CCS plugs.

Do Not Read Between The Lines

And so it begins …

No average buyer wants to “choose” a charging standard.

This is a nice addition and the Nissan dealerships seem to be much more aggressive with pricing than I can find at any of the local Chevy dealers, at least in my area of the country.

Whether this is going to be enough and if it will arrive in time to beat the base Model 3 will be interesting. If Tesla does something like seriously de-content the M3, use cheap cloth seats and a smallish (<54 kWh) battery, there is a chance Nissan may sell quite a few new Leafs.

The Model 3 standard is exactly that. What are you expecting? Steel roof instead of glass, cloth seats, and likely no center console (or much more limited). Efficiency means small battery gets same range as leaf.

This is why Tesla wins. They get same range as Leaf for 50 kWh as Leaf uses for 62 kWh, the cars sell for the same price, the money saved on the battery goes to Tesla’s bottom line.

The Leaf looks appealing, but which would you buy? The Model 3 would get my money due to more plentiful charging network and available Autopilot.

Three Nissan dealers in my neighborhood, Tesla – zero.

Actually, there is no Tesla dealers any where in Earth…:).
But you remember someone in an other site comparing Audi worldwide network of service centres and about Tesla having far less, forgetting that when Tesla revealed its first car (the Roadster in 2006), Audi already existed for an hundred years!
Sometimes people still are whinnying about Tesla small network of service centres or showrooms (in some States, say thanks to some unfair laws that prevent Tesla to have them there or limit them to open the number of installations they need) and at the same time they are whinnying about Tesla being bleeding cash! Tesla is doing what ever they can, but it is difficult, and costly, to match, in ten years, incumbent brands network of service centres, “dealers” and factories spread all other the world that are here for an hundred years…Be patient…

With chargers right . Same here plus the EV god in the area they putting up in PA

How many browser capable devices do you have? Quite literally, every browser capable device is a Tesla “dealer”.

Imagine a world where Tesla partnered with an existing dealership network to service and support their cars, at least for a little while. Toyota is a perfect match, they don’t want to make EVs and they have already partnered with Tesla in the past on the RAV4. In this world it’s good to have friends.

Hopefully at Tesla cooler heads will prevail and they will pivot as necessary to fill bigger shoes and not suffer the downfalls of vertical integration with an iron fist. With good partners they could easily capture 80% of the EV market (a Microsoft if you will) or they could block out the world and do it on their own for <20% market share (like Apple). The next 3-5 years will be critical for expansion in the EV space to bring on some heavy hitter corporate partnerships to solve the needs of the many not only focusing on the wants of a few.

A friend ordered a Model 3 AWD. They brought it to his house free of charge. We live 4 hours from the nearest Tesla Showroom. Way easier than haggling at the local Nissan dealer.

If I had the parking space, and the Money, I would get Both!
😋

And do you honestly think Tesla would ever do that(what you just said)?

Electrek has this learned during their Nissan paid invitation to the CES show :

“” I had a chance to talk to Kazuhiro Doi, Nissan’s Alliance Global Director of Research about the new battery pack. Some details:
The battery pack cells are made by LG and are still passively cooled …. “”

So not even a simple fan cooling as rumored before ….

Software was fix in the last couple of months that rapidgate is no more

You hope it doesn’t just mean more cell degradation. Given Nissan’s history, I would bet on higher cell degradation.

Nissan warranty on batteries are top notch. If it degrades you get a better battery in the future with better chemistry

That would mean very high GHG emissions. And It is still better to not have the degradation, as that’s a lot of degradation to be experiencing before replacement and a lot of stress for the buyer.

Rapidgate no more when the battery temperature is 47C after second DCFC session in -7C ambient? That’s 54C degree increase just using 50 kW charger (average charge power is lot less). Gotta love low expectations.

Are they not going to sell in China which is the World’s #1 market.
Adding another range gives it a dual range which should double the sales.
Will they add another model with 80 KWh in 2020?. This will go a full 300 mile range and will be used by Cabs worldwide and also those who want long range driving.
Are they going to sell a dual motor version, if so it can be badged as a crossover which is the best selling segment.
But it all depends on how actively Nissan and its dealers sell it.

Didn’t they announce another EV for the chinese market?

they are selling a very similar EV specifically made for China market there.

They sell Nissan Sylphy there which I believe is a sedan Leaf. They started offering it just months ago and already registered 2k+ month. Considering the fact that ICE Sylphy sells more than 20k per month, they have a lot of room for improvement. 🙂

About time!

Yeah, Nissan is well beyond fashionably late to the 200 mile + EV range party.

Anyone care to speculate on the 0-60 time with the greater power? My future EV can’t be a slug – I don’t need sports car acceleration, but has to be decent.

I’ll bite — 6-7 seconds. The original LEAF(s) were 9+, I believe.
Not that impressive, but 0-30 will be sub 3, probably!

It is 160 kW (215 hp), borderline too high for FWD, it should be RWD. VW ID Neo will probably be a much better featured car for the same price in Europe. RWD to handle power, faster and more available charging, etc. Leaf is still nice and should beat the ID to market at least. All depends on pricing I think, why Nissan is waiting to announce it. ID Neo is not coming to the US, unfortunately.

Say that to all the FWD cars that 300+ HP

Gasser FWD are very front heavy, not so for EV.

Very few handle that power well. Anything over about 250 starts to bring complaints (or it is in big heavy cars). The cars with that much power tend to heavily limit torque application from a start to limit wheel spin and torque steer.

As you accelerate in any car, your weight shifts rearwards. In a RWD car this increases the load on the rear wheels giving you added friction. The harder you accelerate the more weight pushes down on the rear to maintain traction with the road.

FWD cars the opposite happens, the harder you accelerate the less traction you have. This is why FWD tires squeal their tires so easily when starting from a stop, especially up hill or on slippery surfaces. Old RWD cars that were front heavy had some trouble on slick surfaces from a stop as you don’t get the weight transfer effect as much on slick surfaces like that (you can’t accelerate as quickly)+

So the range is about the same as SR Model 3.
Price will be about $30000 after tax credit for the S trim.
Model 3 will be about $34000 after tax credit for Model 3 SR (assuming it will come after May 31, 2019).
If I am shopping for a new EV, I would hold out for the SR Model 3 and pay $4000 more.
1. Super Charger network.
2. M3 accelerates faster.
3. Autopilot > Pro pilot.
4. Keyless entry and heated seats are standard, … right, Elon?
5. Tesla looks better than Nissan.

For the “must have a hatchback” fan club, who are not going to want to wait around for another 18 months for a Tesla Model Y, they may possibly consider pulling the trigger on a 24 month Leaf Lease. This option will just tide them over, in the mean time, as Tesla starts to up Model Y production.

Model Y will be much more expensive than the Leaf.

How are you calculating $34,000? SR+PUP is ~$41,000 with delivery fee. After May 31st the rebate drops to $1,875. That’s $39,125.

The autopilot and propilot are optional. Leaf plus SL will be $6k more than S trim also.

6. Tesla battery has liquid thermal management system.

Ouch, that #6 is a LTMS doozy!

don’t forget depreciation, Tesla should hold its value better vs nissan if its like prior year models, won’t matter much if you hold onto the car for a full 10-14 years but if you end up selling in 5-7, Tesla would be the way to go. not sure if a nissan could even last 10 years.

The CHAdeMO circuits on the new Electrify America chargers are actually rated for 100 kW even though no Leaf has yet been able to get more than 50 kW out of them. I wonder if these 62 kWh Leafs will be able to get more power out of the EA chargers. It won’t be long before people will start trying to figure out how to get the 62 kWh pack into the older Leafs.

If you watch Nyland video it’s pretty clear why 50kW is the limit. Anything more, and you accumulate too much heat. At 54C degree rise above ambient even at 35kW average, even 50kW is too much.

Sure the new pack may peak at 100 kW (or 70 kW). But what is the average? If using no cooling like now, it’d still be 35kW due to thermal limit.

Do Not Read Between The Lines

Re-read the article. Nissan is talking about 70kW charging with 100kW peak.

I’ll believe it when I see it. When Nyland shows Leaf battery temperature of 47C while the ambient is -7C when using 50 kW charger, how are they going to charge 70 kW for any length of time without real TMS? 10 seconds?

i think this is better than expected – not just a battery, also a new motor, new charger, new screen and apps. Price will be interesting. Should keep them relevant. I’d say probably well done. But….. I won’t be giving up my Model 3.

Price in Japan is 4,162,320 Yen and 4,729,320 Yen including tax.

Current 40kwh Leaf goes for about i¥3.15 million to ¥3.99 million for comparison.

worse efficiency than the Bolt. How can they have a bigger battery but less range?

When you recycle the now ~10 year old platform of the original Leaf, rather than starting from scratch. That’s how. Nissan’s motto seems to be “the cheaper, the better”.

ipace also bigger battery, less range than Bolt. Poor engineering will do that. If you rank range divide by battery kWh, you can see who has better engineering in first order approximation (hint: Tesla 3 #1, but guess who’s #2)

Actually, based on your metric, the lowly, meager range Hyundai Ioniq EV beats them all. Based on combined MPGe here are the top 3 BEV/PHEV vehicles on the market:
1. Ioniq EV 136 combined MPGe
2. Prius Prime 133 combined MPGe
3. Tesla M3 LR’s 126-130 combined MPGe

Prius Prime doesn’t count since it’s a gasser not to mention even less electric range than a minivan. However, you are correct on IoniqEV and Tesla 3, and they are indeed well engineered to first order approximation.

PHEV disqualification not mentioned in your statement: “If you rank range divide by battery kWh, you can see who has better engineering in first order approximation (hint: Tesla 3 #1, but guess who’s #2)”

Just pointing out that both Hyundai & Toyota are “better engineered” than Tesla- based solely on your metric. 🙂
But since you brought it up, after #3 Tesla, who is #4 in terms of range/kWh?

Prime has 25 miles range with 8.8 kWh battery, 2.8 mi/kWh. Bolt has 238 miles range with 60 kWh battery, 4.0 mi/kWh. Even without gas engine, Prime is poor.

Tesla 3 MR, 268/65=4.1, IoniqEV 125/28=4.5. This is why I considered Ioniq when shopping.

hint, it’s not Chevrolet…

#4 Hyundai Kona EV: 120 combined MPGe
#5 (tie) Chevy Bolt, VW eGolf, Hyundai Ioniq PHEV: 119 combined MPGe
#6 BMW i3: 118 combined MPGe

https://fueleconomy.gov/feg/PowerSearch.do?action=noform&path=1&year1=2018&year2=2019&vtype=Electric

https://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/PowerSearch.do?action=alts&year1=2018&year2=2019&vtype=Plug-in+Hybrid&srchtyp=newAfv

Read what I wrote; it’s not MPGe, but miles range divided by battery kWh. In that, Prime is worse than all EV other than ipace. Same applies to Ioniq PHV, and Kona isn’t even out.

ioniqEV 125/28=4.5
Tesla 3 310/75=4.1
Bolt 238/60=4
i3 150/42=3.6
egolf 125/35.8=3.5

SparkEV 82/18.4=4.5 (yes, very well engineered car!)

I’ll also add, what kind of crap engineering was put into Prime such that it’s 133 MPGe rating, yet only achieves 2.8 mi/kWh? If anything, it has to be the poorest engineered car due to such large differential.

A brief web search tells me that the Prime has about 6 kwh usable out of the 8.8 kwh battery pack. 25 miles/6 kwh = 4.17 miles/kwh

I wrote battery capacity, not usable capacity. Such large reserve is hiding some poor engineering.

“new charging system” does that mean CCS or still dead standard walking ChaDeMo?

Price

“Nissan LEAF remains the best-selling electric car in history with more than 380,000 sales since 2010 (including over 128,000 in the U.S.).”

Tesla Model 3 already beat the US sales figure. And is going to blow past the global Leaf sales in short order.

Model 3 will probably take the #1 position from the Leaf this year

Disgusting passive cooling and terribly slow 70 kW charging rate. IN the desert SW this car is not going to sell–especially priced near the Tesla which Leaf will lose it’s $7500 rebate in 2019 as well. Nissan is acting more and more like Honda and Toyota trying to force people to buy PHEVs or FCEVs both of which are not desirable in America. Screw yourself Nissan I’m selling my 2017 Leaf as not happy to learn about your persistent belief that BEVS should be driven only in the city so you can continue selling your smog polluting fossil fuel cars.

How are they going to lose their full $7500 rebate in 2019? They’re at 130K vehicles through 2018. They’d have to sell over 5500 a month to reach the 200K threshold.

Wtf you taking about?

This would’ve been exciting 2 years ago, but now I’d just buy a Bolt, or better yet, a Model 3. Nissan squandered a golden opportunity being first to market, but they’ve yet to get it right.

In the voice of Trump Church Lady:

Well isn’t that special Nissan. Sin City electric cars! So very nice and clever.
How about a f@#%ing delivery/cargo van for the good old USA!
You could call it the Trump series eNV200 + for delivering wine and steaks in Atlantic City…

Exit stage left dancing wildly constrained.

😂😁😀

I could be wrong but I didn’t see the AC charging wattage. Only DC charging. Is it missing from this article?

This is now officially the ugliest 200+ mile BEV on sale. I mean honestly… it looks like a Prius.

Have you been blinded by Prius ugly? NOTHING looks as ugly as Prius.

I went from a 2006 HHR to a 2012 Prius V, clearly beauty is in the eye of the beholder ;P

Old Prius was not too bad. I’m talking about the new ones. It’s like some sewer monster that just crawled out.

No telescoping steering wheel, no buy

People in Japan really shouldn’t have any problem with the range of the Nissan Leaf e+. Range anxiety should really be a thing of the past. The 62 kWh battery pack is substantially better than the 40 kWh battery pack. Most people in Japan drive less than 200 miles per day anyway.

But will that be enough to have people make the switch from their ICE cars to this Nissan Leaf e+?

What are the expectations from car experts regarding the sales numbers of the Nissan Leaf e+ in Japan in 2019?

I’m missing one big feature that might not play a role in the US or Japan, but does in Europe: 3-phase charging! Almost all houses (not perse their private chargers) and all public chargers in The Netherlands do have 3-phases. Having a 3-phase charger (like Renault has) would charge the car at 3 times the speed of the charger they use now. (A bit depending on using 16A or 32A chargers and charge poles. In The Netherlands, most charge poles have two connectors and work at 32A max when only one car is connected and 16A when two cars are charging.)

Well now we know why they kept delaying it. That efficiency is a bit weak and just air cooled?

Again, this is why I say aerodynamics, aerodynamics, aerodynamics! People will look at those specs and though they have no idea what aerodynamics are, they see the price and the range.

Also….CCS? Do it or die.

C’mon Nissan. Make it dual-capable: Have both CCS and Chademo fast-charge ports.

Do you want it to sell or not? You can see the future of the US DCFC market in the USA just like I can.

You KNOW that it is the right thing to do.

If Nissan really gives the Leaf a CCS port they can forget about Chademo immediately. Which would be quite nice.

CHAdeMO’s death would be the best thing to happen to US fast charging. The less standards, the better.

“In addition to ProPILOT and e-Pedal, every LEAF is equipped with advanced safety technologies including Intelligent Lane Intervention, Lane Departure Warning, Intelligent Emergency Braking, Blind Spot Warning, Rear Cross Traffic Alert and Intelligent Around View Monitor with moving object detection.”

I found this interesting. Currently with the 40kwh Leaf, you have to get the SV trim and add on a $2,200 option to get pro pilot and these other safety features.

So is that changing with 2019? And Nissan is adding all those features as standard?

Nissan should have gone with the CCS charging system… Also, a liquid cooling system is a must, unless they intend to sell this thing for $30k…
Also, what is their intended production numbers? 300,000 pear year, at $30k-$35k woudl probably be a good price….

If the volume of the battery remains almost the same, the battery capacity increases by 55% and the energy density increases by 25%, than the weight of the battery has to increase by about 24 %.

70 kW charging is really deceptive 😮

Unless I am reading this wrong, this thing is DOA,

According to Nissan’s UK site, it is £40k before incentives (£36,995 after Gov Incentive) and only 5k copies of the larger battery for the whole of Europe ?

£31k for 40kWh (old battery still) including Gov Incentive ?

Feeling somewhat deflated !

Do Not Read Between The Lines

https://www.nissan.co.uk/vehicles/new-vehicles/leaf/prices-specifications.html#grade-LEAFZE1A-0

In the UK the 40kWh Leaf base is £31k _before_ incentives.
The current high price quoted is for some stupid “ZERO” “limited edition”.

Wow, more unsatisfied customers dumping their eplus 3 years from now, WIN!

My wife and I own a model 3 LR and 2018 Leaf SL and we are glad we didn’t wait for this especially if they plan on selling it anywhere near list price. I think the 40 kWh Leaf could sell pretty well as a city car if the price is right. And for us it was at about $28K net for a completely loaded SL _before_ tax incentives. That was 1/2 what I paid for my LR model 3 and still $10K less than a SR model 3 will go for delivered in any color but black and lacking even adaptive cruise control. I think the problem is people see the list price and that keeps them away. If Nissan just lowered the list price to the sales price people would see the Leaf is really in the 20s before any tax incentives. The model 3 is much more car for sure and priced (price = what people actually pay) accordingly. If people think Leafs cost near model 3 prices sales trouble is ahead for sure. As for how our Leaf compares to our model 3: Leaf wins on seating position (especially in the back seats), Epedal Vs Tesla… Read more »

Since I think we can assume the lack of cooling system is going to show up in long distance fast charging, this car better have a price advantage over the competition.

Is active thermal management really so tough for Nissan? Perhaps if they worked on that instead of locking up their CEO.

It needs a good battery cooling system and an aggressive price or the Model 3 will pass it up within 2 years….Let’s see what happens!

it is kind of strange that the miles per kwh decreased when comparing 40kwh and 62kwh battery

If you take 30kwh Leaf with 107 miles range you get 3,57 mpkwh
40kwh Leaf with 151 miles range gets you 3,78 mpkwh
And when they said the size is only 5mm bigger so therefore you should be getting 3,99 mpkwh which would result in a range of 247 miles, not only 226
I know it’s not much but that difference is 80% of my journey from home to work, so it’s not nothing you know that every mile counts especially in winter : )

More powerful motor uses more energy

Weighs 300lbs more

Besides inefficient and probably crappy battery, I will give credit where credit is due: POWER. It took pushing and pulling from Tesla and GM, but FINALLY, we have a decent EV power from Nissan. I can’t wait to see Leaf vs Bolt drag races.

Do Not Read Between The Lines

2011: 80kW
2018: 110kW
2019: + 160kW

Yup. GM could learn a thing from Nissan (did I just say that??!?!?)

So, what is the competition for this car? You currently have the Bolt. Those two are pretty similar rather uninspiring cars that get you over 200 miles of electric range. So, if you are looking for simply an EV that is somewhat affordable, during the time they both have their rebates those two will be decent choices. The new Kona and Niro EVs seem like a much more desirable choice for most people since those are more up to date cars. Cars designed for 2019, not 2015. Things change quickly these days in the EV world. They will also qualify for the full federal rebate program for a long time. The problem with the Kona and Niro is that there is no reason to believe that Hyundai/Kia have any desire to sell large quantities of them, so they will probably be unavailable to most people. What are the other EV choices? It’s also all about the rebate. Companies that don’t have the rebate, will not be able to compete with those that do. That is going to have to change. I still put Tesla in a different category. That is a luxury car vs. these cars, and still currently in… Read more »
Do Not Read Between The Lines

KoNiro.
Don’t know about available volume for this though.

Niro and Kona are compliance vehicles in the US, they won’t be sold broadly, where Leaf and Bolt EV are both nationwide.

Do Not Read Between The Lines

Don’t know what the available volume will be on the +.