Nissan Outlines Changes For 2015 LEAF


The 2015 Model Year Nissan LEAF is “available now,” according to Nissan.

For full details on the 2015 LEAF, follow the link below:

Details On 2015 Nissan LEAF Released – LEAF S Priced From $29,010

For an overview of just the changes found on the 2015 LEAF (as compared to the 2014 LEAF), refer to Nissan’s “Charting the Changes” post on the 2015 LEAF below:

For 2015, enhancements include:

  • A new MorningSky Blue exterior color (late availability)
  • The addition of Hands-Free Text Messaging Assistant and Voice Destination Entry for SV and SL grades
  • New standard 17-inch aluminum-alloy wheels for the SV grade (late availability)
  • The base LEAF S grade receives standard “B-Mode,” which engages regenerative braking more aggressively while decelerating
  • All 2015 LEAF models include three drive modes: Normal, Eco-Mode and B-Mode
  • Offered in S, SV and SL models
Mornignsky Blue (Left) In Ocean Blue Out

Morningsky Blue (Left) In – Blue Ocean Out

Category: Nissan


25 responses to "Nissan Outlines Changes For 2015 LEAF"
  1. GeorgeS says:

    It’s the typical deal like when I bot my Volt.
    You get nailed if you want some decent wheels.
    No way I’d have a leaf with steel wheels.

    I want base level S with:
    alloy wheels charger
    fast charging

    and that’s it. I don’t need all these electronic add ons like hands free texting and on and on.

    1. kdawg says:

      I got the polished alum wheels on my Volt. Love em. Always look shiny/clean. Nissan should offer something similar IMO.

      1. Assaf says:

        To my knowledge, S also lacks the more efficient heat-pump climate control, which is key for maintaining more stable range performance in adverse weather.

        Plus, Carwings is not just a toy. It also enables you to heat/cool the car from the plug before starting to drive on those adverse-weather days. We used it extensively last winter, after being clueless about it the first winter.

        As to wheels: my gut feeling is that 17″ wheels should hurt driving range, for 2 reasons.
        1. They make the car ride higher off the road.
        2. They consume more energy to accelerate compared with 16″ aluminum (which the 2014 SV has).

        Please correct me if you think I’m wrong.

        1. John F says:

          I think you are wrong about the 17 inch wheels. The height of the vehicle stays the same because the tires also change. If the 17 inch wheel with tire combination weighs less than the 16 inch wheel with its tire, it would change the handling slightly. Less weight would have better vehicle range and faster acceleration, but the change would be very small.

          1. Assaf says:

            Someone at did the wheel+tire numbers and it came out the 17″ is still larger than the 16″ overall. Maybe he was wrong; the easiest thing would be to check two of them next to each other, e.g. at a dealer’s lot. Which I didn’t do of course 🙂

            1. John F says:

              If the tire diameter changes significantly, the speedometer would display an incorrect speed. Its not likely Nissan would have any part of that.

              From the Nissan Leaf specs, the 16″ wheels come with the P205/55R16 tires. The 17″ wheels come with the P215/50R17 tires. If I calculated the diameters correctly from these numbers, the 16″ wheel with tire combination has a diameter of 24.88″, while the 17″ set yields 25.46 inches. On paper, that would make the vehicle about 1/4-inch higher with the 17″ wheels. That may be what your forum poster was saying. I don’t think the numbers are that exact. The sizing is rounded off the the nearest 5 millimeters. The tire aspect ratio is also rounded off the nearest 5 percent. Tire pressure and tread wear will also have an effect on the diameter when comparing tires this closely. It seems the choices for the Leaf are for effectively the same diameter tire. I wouldn’t worry about changes in ground clearance. (However, if you go out and measure, share what you learn.)

        2. GeorgeS says:

          Good point on the heat pump. I’d want that also. However I have the remote stuff on my Volt and don’t ever use it.

        3. Aaron says:

          On the “S” model, you can set the timer to pre-heat/pre-cool the car. You just can’t do it through your cell phone.

    2. Mikael says:

      Steel is always an alloy. So if you just want alloy wheels then they could be made out of steel.

    3. Anderlan says:

      Ship it with a 240V charging cable standard! I’m shelling out upwards of $500 for something that comes in the box in other markets and other EVs.

      1. Anderlan says:

        I’m having to explain to prospective buyers “yeah, it charges at the house in a day and a half”. Sure, it works out that most days you don’t need a full tank, but it just introduces a speed bump to adoption. AND DID I MENTION it shouldn’t be a big deal to just ship one?!?!

  2. Dr. Kenneth Noisewater says:


    1. qwerty says:


    2. Spec9 says:

      Yep. Just some tweaks. The best part of this is that some people will get some good deals on 2014 models still on the lots.

      We are all looking forward to a bigger refresh WITH MORE BATTERY CAPACITY!

      And it would be nice to get more body styles . . . at least bring on that eNV-200 ASAP.

  3. prsist says:

    Double the range!…now that’s how to make me a happy camper!

  4. MichaelB says:

    The centerpiece of the hub cap is no longer blue.

    The buttons on the left are rearranged.

    Some of the NON-LED lights no longer have a blue surface.

  5. David says:

    No official mention of the hot battery. That is the significant assumed improvement in the 2015. Can’t wait to see how it really holds up.

  6. Assaf says:

    So have they changed the drive modes yet again?

    We just got a late 2014 in the “closeout” they did on July 4th weekend (our 2012 lease was due; could have waited for the 2015 but since there seemed to be no major news, we opted for the better deal).

    The 2014 seems to have 4 drive modes, not 3: Eco on/off (via a button on the wheel that remains in the state you had it when last powered off), and D or B.

    If they say it’s 3 modes for the 2015, does it mean that Eco is back onto the gear puck the way it was in 2011-2? Frankly the 4th possible option (B without Eco) doesn’t make much sense anyway, but I wonder why they keep tweaking such a basic driver interface.

    My biggest letdown with the 2014 so far was discovered out only a day after we got it: they added this ridge at the base of the middle back seat. I’m guessing it’s been that way since 2013, but for some reason I saw no one mention it in driver forums. The 2011-2 could easily seat 5 adults, and we in particular could accommodate 3 kids (2 of them lanky teenagers) and a respectable-sized dog in the back. Now, it’s going to be much tighter. And a total blind-sight too. I never even bothered looking at the back seat of a 2013-4; assumed it was the same.

    Well… it’s only two years again, not a Catholic marriage by any means. But I wonder whether the Leaf Gen II will revert to proper 5-adult seating, or constrained back-seat space is here to stay.

    1. GeorgeS says:

      Where are you finding 2 year leases?
      How much does the monthly payment change between a 2 yr vs a 3 yr lease?

      1. Assaf says:

        They seem to be ubiquitous everywhere, for sure here around Seattle. If your dealer doesn’t offer one, just press them a bit harder 🙂

        In general the overall cost (down + payments) for 2 years is more than 2/3 of the 3 year cost, but far less than the full cost.

        In the present situation of BEV market and technology I find it the best option; but talk to me after a few months we’ve had this 2014 one, I hope I won’t have more complaints beyond the ridge thingy.

        1. GeorgeS says:

          Thx for the response.

  7. Lou Grinzo says:

    I’ve seen this show before. I worked at IBM during the introduction of the original IBM PC, and the first few years after it came out were exciting because of all the change but also very frustrating as we kept waiting for faster processors, more memory, bigger/faster hard drives (for those of us who could even afford one in the early days), and higher density graphics. Eventually technology caught up to our wanton desires and surpassed them, but holy cow was it a tough wait.

    I suspect EVs will play out much the same way. We’ll fuss and argue over every little detail here in our niche, EV sales will continue to grow and eventually hit the legendary tipping point where suddenly “everyone” wants one. Then we’ll be the geezers telling young people horror stories about all-night recharge times, sub-100-mile ranges, etc.

    And so it goes.

    1. Assaf says:

      haha, our friends already laugh at us and poke fun at the stories we’ll tell our grandkids. Meanwhile they’re sticking to a 7-seat Highlander, but were kind enough to keep us company while charging the other day 🙂

    2. Aaron says:

      [geezer voice]
      Back in my day, my LEAF took 23 hours to charge from an empty battery! You damn kids and your supercapacitors, charging up in 15 seconds. You don’t know the meaning of range anxiety!
      [/geezer voice]

  8. keep on improving this vehicle, many people i know waiting, price needs lowering