Nissan To Electrify A Third Of Its Volume In Australia

OCT 5 2018 BY MARK KANE 7

The new LEAF will soon land Down Under.

Nissan is finally introducing the new Nissan LEAF in Australia, although first customer deliveries are still not scheduled until mid-2019.

The Japanese brand intends to sell the LEAF at 89 dealerships across the country (up from 12 in the case of the first-generation LEAF in 2012). The market launch will be supported by EV installation experts JET Charge.

Interestingly, despite Australia not being a big market for electric cars (market share is negligible), Nissan said that during the current mid-term plan (“Nissan M.O.V.E. to 2022”), one-third of its Australian volume will include electric technology. We could guess that maybe some e-POWER series-hybrids are coming to Australia, as it’s hard to imagine that 1/3 of sales will be plug-ins.

Nissan Australia managing director, Stephen Lester said:

“Electrified vehicles will represent a third of Nissan volume in Australia during our mid-term plan. By introducing more electric alternatives on several of our key models, we will make mass market electrification a reality. I have no doubt electric vehicles will be a success here, and sooner than many think, and Nissan is planning for this now to ensure we meet the future needs of the buyer.”

Categories: Nissan

Tags: ,

Leave a Reply

7 Comments on "Nissan To Electrify A Third Of Its Volume In Australia"

newest oldest most voted
G2

Lets hope Nissan is serious.

Kathryn

But when will they release the e-NV200? I’m sure there are a lot of tradespeople who want one.

LS

Australia + no TMS? Seems like a bad combo. Should have waited for the new battery model.

antrik

Perhaps that’s why the actual market entry is not scheduled before mid-2019?…

DP

In the Sydney Morning Herald article about this, it states “Nissan claims the 2018 Leaf has the world’s first purpose-built bi-directional vehicle battery, allowing it to act as a mobile power plant.”

This quote from the article is something I find interesting in that it isn’t promoted in North America and wonder why. I thought it might be something to do with the voltage, but the household voltage for Australia is 230V and Japan is 100V. Is it used in Europe?

Mills

We need to get rid off this LNP scum Government who is anti renewable energy.

William

Throw a lump of coal on the Barbie, and get some opposition candidates that can get the votes for a renewable WIN!