Nissan-Dongfeng To Introduce Cheaper Electric Car In China

1 year ago by Eric Loveday 10

Locally Made, Venucia e30/Morning Wind Went On Sale In China In September of 2014

Locally Made, Venucia e30/Morning Wind Went On Sale In China In September of 2014

Venucia ViWa Concept

Venucia ViWa Concept

Asian news outlet Nikkei is reporting that the Nissan-Dongfeng joint venture (Dongfeng Nissan Passenger Vehicle Company) will launch a much lower-priced electric car in the very near future.

The upcoming car will be approximately 30% less expensive than the JV’s existing Venucia e30 (which is identical in almost every way to the Nissan LEAF). That implies a price in the neighborhood of RMB 200,000 ($30,400 USD), but with subsidies factored in, the price drops even lower.

As news outlet Nikkei states:

“The new vehicle will sell for 100,000 yuan to 150,000 yuan after government subsidies, comparable to the price of a gasoline-fueled car of the same size. Nissan aims to expand its share in China’s electric car market from 2% in 2015 to 5-10% over the next several years through the new, cheaper model.”

The upcoming electric car will be produced in China with “key parts such as batteries from within China,”
which is how pricing will be kept in check.

There’s no firm launch date, nor has a name for the vehicle been released, at this point in time.

Source: Nikkei

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10 responses to "Nissan-Dongfeng To Introduce Cheaper Electric Car In China"

  1. mr. M says:

    Will the 24kWh Leaf also be 30% less expensive? That would be awesome 🙂

  2. Stephen Hodges says:

    Looks OK… sort of Fit sized (any Zoe in the DNA?)

  3. ffbj says:

    The one area where they can make a splash. Why bother developing any other sort of vehicle? Non-electric that is. VW is saying they will dump the diesel. No one, even in their wildest dreams predicted that. The twilight of the ice, and in twilight time the stars come out to shine…

  4. Alex says:

    Thats around 15k $ for new EV, cool! Hope some new battery technology.

  5. Trollnonymous says:

    Nope.
    It will have to be LiFePO4 if they build and sell it in China.

    1. Martin Winlow says:

      Why?!

  6. Trollnonymous says:

    With the way the protectionism is going in China, Tesla should use cells from the Wanxiang Group (A123). These should work fine performance wise but for range, it will get reduced.

    1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

      I very strongly doubt Tesla is going to redesign its cars to use the lower energy density types of li-ion cells, merely to improve sales in China… or more specifically, to be able to take advantage of government incentives for plug-in EVs in the Chinese market.

      And Tesla would be foolish to do so. This is merely another case of China using onerous and arbitrary rules to block foreign competition in the luxury goods market. Even if Tesla did give in to this form of economic blackmail, there’s nothing to stop China from imposing yet another arbitrary rule to block sales of that model, too.

      Bottom line: Once you give into blackmail, you can never stop. The proper response by Tesla, and other non-Chinese auto makers trying to sell upscale plug-in EVs in China, is to negotiate for an end to this unfair trade practice. Or, perhaps better: get the U.S. State Department to negotiate on their behalf.

      1. Trollnonymous says:

        “Or, perhaps better: get the U.S. State Department to negotiate on their behalf.”

        lol, that’s how we got into this mess.

        “Even if Tesla did give in to this form of economic blackmail, there’s nothing to stop China from imposing yet another arbitrary rule to block sales of that model, too.”

        Yeah, like they can’t sell any single letter model named cars, must be 3 characters or more….. 😛

        1. super390 says:

          China could have learned everything it needed to know about unfair trade practices from the history of the US before WW2, and Japan afterwards. It’s a long list of tricks – and they work.