NIO ES6 Electric Crossover Specs, Images & Video From World Debut

DEC 16 2018 BY MARK KANE 22

NIO ES6 – Fast & Further

NIO delivered so far more than 9,700 NIO ES8, but after the recent unveiling of the NIO ES6 we should expect a lot more from the Chinese manufacturer, which seems to aspire to be the Chinese-Tesla.

With the launch of the second all-electric model in mid-2019, NIO could become a major player in the premium segment, especially since prices are very competitive.

Here is an additional set of images and all of the numbers that we could uncover for specs and prices:

NIO ES6
16 photos
NIO ES6 NIO ES6 NIO ES6 NIO ES6 NIO ES6 NIO ES6 NIO ES6 NIO ES6 NIO ES6 NIO ES6 NIO ES6 NIO ES6 NIO ES6 NIO ES6 NIO ES6

NIO ES6 Performance spec:

  • 70 kWh or 84 kWh battery (liquid cooled, NCM811 cells, 170 Wh/kg)
  • 510 km (317 miles) of range (NEDC) with 84 kWh battery or 430 km (267 miles) with 70 kWh battery
  • dual motor all-wheel drive
  • 0-100 km/h (62 mph) in 4.7 seconds
  • system output: 400 kW (160 kW permanent magnet motor in the front and 240 kW induction motor in the rear) and 725 Nm of torque
  • top speed of 200 km/h (124 mph)
  • Length: 4.85 m, width: 2 m and wheelbase 2.9 m

NIO ES6 Standard spec:

  • 70 kWh or 84 kWh battery (liquid cooled, NCM811 cells, 170 Wh/kg)
  • 480 km (298 miles) of range (NEDC) with 84 kWh battery or 410 km (255 miles) with 70 kWh battery
  • dual motor all-wheel drive
  • 0-100 km/h (62 mph) in 5.6 seconds
  • system output: 320 kW (two 160 kW permanent magnet motors)
  • top speed of 200 km/h (124 mph)
  • Length: 4.85 m, width: 2 m and wheelbase 2.9 m

The prices are (before subsidies):

  • Standard (320 kW, 70 kWh): 358,000 yuan (≈$51,827)
  • Standard (320 kW, 84 kWh): 408,000 yuan (≈$59,065)
  • Performance (400 kW, 70 kWh): 398,000 yuan (≈$57,617)
  • Performance (400 kW, 84 kWh): 448,000 yuan (≈$64,856)

As you can see, the cost of upgrade from 70 to 84 kWh is 50,000 yuan (≈$7,238) for 14 kWh or 40,000 yuan (≈$5,790) for more power.

NIO ES6

NIO ES6

NIO ES6

NIO ES6

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22 Comments on "NIO ES6 Electric Crossover Specs, Images & Video From World Debut"

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Still expensive.

So Tesla is. In China, $78,000 for standard Model 3.

Cause tarrifs

China places tarrifs on on cars and many other products. Generally China is a closed market for American products. We should elect a president who will try to do something about that. Oh wait, we did. And he is.

> We should elect a president who will try to do something about that. Oh wait, we did. And he is.

With great success so far as he has managed to increase tariffs in both directions

No tariffs at all is the best solution but China’s mercantilist trade policy and intellectual property theft went unchallenged for too long. Trump’s long overdue retaliation IS working. China blinked because they hurt more than the US does.

Well the Chinese can just pick up a BYD or BAIC then…

ES6 is cheaper than the nonexistence of Model Y right now. 🙂

Model Y hasent even been revealed yet, NIO is shipping in about 6 months. I’d say they are beating them to market.

Did anyone else catch that owners of an ES8 with the 70kWh can juat drive to swap station and come out with and 84kWh pack? Since the batteries are leased its just like an early trade in and upgrade.

Another EV with a long hood …….what IS the point of that?
Looks very generic to me. Toyota Rav 4 anyone?

I’d rather have a Jaguar I-Pace ….. but its good to have choice.

So this is what you want an electric version of? : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microvan
No hood, shaped more like a loaf.
A long hood may be a safer solution, in violent crashes (given proper crash safety design). If offers the passengers in the car a bit more time to go from 60 to 0 km/h, and should be better for their internal organs.

One good thing is that with the Nissan fiasco we now have specs that loudly state that their batteries are liquid cooled. Most buyers should use that as filter in determining which cars to exclude in their determination of what to look for in and ev.
No liquid cooling, no car buying, no fooling.

The buying public these days has the power and information to buy the best products which in turn should force manufacturers to do their best, and discontinue the practice of foisting inferior products on gullible customers. Unfortunately this methodology and support networks, dealerships, executives, that underpin this approach, to put one over on you, is in their DNA.
If a vehicle is not up to snuff don’t buy. Caveat Emptor.

Nissan Leaf is profitable I presume. It got that way by cutting costs. For better or worse the cut battery cooling. If there was a $1,500 option for battery liquid cooling, would you buy it? Could be a good option for those in say Norway who could probably get away not having liquid cooling.

Living in Washington State when the temp drops to the upper 30’s I get the dreaded snowflake on my Leaf which means charging time doubles and more while range drops 15 or more miles, a battery heater (which it has but only comes on at -4 degrees and according to Nissan is not adjustable…..brilliantly Dumb thinking) which is what is needed in colder climates, overall the battery desperately needs thermal management which is falling on deaf ears at Nissan, that’s why my next electric will be Hyundai and why the Leaf sits from November to March.

Electric cars area not so good with extreme temperatures. Some per example there are reports of Tesla model 3 losing 40% of its range.

Is there any way to add a heater?

You mean thermal management, Telsa and Bolt also heat the batteries up as needed to prevent problems. Even in Norway. I would not buy a Leaf in Norway any more than Tuscon.

They can air cool batteries IF they do it right, Nissan did not and refused to fix it.

Well you can’t say these are bad looking or EV weird-mobiles and they are optioned with some good buzz-word components (i.e., Brembo brakes and Pirelli tires). The real test will be how well they fare on more real-world mileage, safety and handling/acceleration scores, which are what I consider a better measures of their engineering prowess.

I do like the margin all these companies are getting for increased battery size. Even at a pack-level cost of 200$ / kWh, which seems incredibly generous given that the pack probably isn’t really different, these upgrades add a huge amount to the margin.

Looks very good, most appealing car I have seen from China. I am sure it will sell well.

267 miles = 230 miles as per US standards which is still better for the $52,000 for this AWD mid size crossover loaded with lots of features. Hope they start selling in USA as well with the factory they are building here.

I’m a bit disappointed with the range, especially with NCM 811 batteries which have a higher energy density than the NCM 622 still used (AFAIK) in all the recent EVs (Tesla excepted).