Next Generation Nissan LEAF Illustrated In 60 kWH Nissan IDS Concept

OCT 28 2015 BY MARK KANE 81

Nissan IDS Concept

Nissan IDS Concept

From the Tokyo Motor Show Nissan has taken the wraps of what it calls “the future of autonomous driving and zero emission EVs” – the Nissan IDS Concept.

Nissan is highlighting the autonomous driving components, but our interest for today lies primarily in what the IDS can do on electricity, as this is surely the precursor to the next generation of Nissan LEAF.

The IDS Concept comes equipped with a 60 kWh battery, of which would net some 500 km/320 miles in Japan on the wildly optimistic JC08 cycle.  In real world/EPA terms, that JC08 rating would likely equal about 215-225 miles (346-362 km).

The Nissan IDS Concept combines several key things:

  • new design for future EVs
  • first large battery in Nissan – 60 kWh
  • autonomous driving

As for the autonomous driving, even if the features will be implemented only partially in the future, the new look and long range should guarantee more market success for the next generation LEAF.

Of interest:  More photos and debut video of the Nissan IDS can be found here.

Our hope of course is that Japanese company will introduce a production version close to the concept car (with less ‘autoshow-fabulousness’ on the inside) with an affordable price.  The next generation LEAF is expected to debut in the second quarter of 2017 as a 2018 model with a couple battery options, perhaps this new “Intelligent Driving” will also arrive first on that car.


Presenting at the show, Nissan president and CEO Carlos Ghosn said:

“Nissan’s forthcoming technologies will revolutionize the relationship between car and driver, and future mobility.”

Full Nissan Press Blast on the IDS Concept below:

Nissan IDS Concept

Nissan IDS Concept

Nissan IDS Concept

Nissan IDS Concept

“After leading the development and expansion of EV technology, Nissan once again stands at the forefront of automotive technology. By integrating advanced vehicle control and safety technologies with cutting-edge artificial intelligence (AI), Nissan is among the leaders developing practical, real-world applications of autonomous drive technology.

In August 2013, Ghosn said that by 2020 Nissan plans to equip innovative autonomous drive technology on multiple vehicles. Progress is well on track to achieve this goal.

Nissan Intelligent Driving is Nissan’s concept of autonomous drive technology and represents what Nissan believes next-generation vehicles should be. “Nissan Intelligent Driving improves a driver’s ability to see, think and react. It compensates for human error, which causes more than 90 percent of all car accidents. As a result, time spent behind the wheel is safer, cleaner, more efficient and more fun,” continued Ghosn.

By 202X, expect to see Nissan Intelligent Driving technology deployed on cars in cities around the world.”

Nissan IDS Concept

Nissan IDS Concept

Nissan IDS Concept

Nissan IDS Concept

Nissan IDS Concept

Nissan IDS Concept

Autonomous Nissan LEAF

Autonomous Nissan LEAF was the base

“The Nissan IDS experience

Some have compared a future with autonomous drive to living in a world of conveyer belts that simply ferry people from point A to B, but the Nissan IDS Concept promises a very different vision of tomorrow. Even when the driver selects Piloted Drive and turns over driving to the vehicle, the car’s performance — from accelerating to braking to cornering — imitates the driver’s own style and preferences.

In Manual Drive mode, the driver has control. The linear acceleration and cornering are pure and exhilarating. Yet behind the scenes, the Nissan IDS Concept continues to provide assistance. Sensors continually monitor conditions and assistance is available even while the driver is in control. In the event of imminent danger, Nissan IDS Concept will assist the driver in taking evasive action.

In addition to learning, the Nissan IDS Concept’s AI communicates like an attentive partner. From information concerning traffic conditions, the driver’s schedule to personal interests, Nissan IDS Concept’s AI has what is needed to help create a driving experience that is comfortable, enjoyable and safe.

Nissan IDS Concept

Nissan IDS Concept

The Nissan IDS experience

Some have compared a future with autonomous drive to living in a world of conveyer belts that simply ferry people from point A to B, but the Nissan IDS Concept promises a very different vision of tomorrow. Even when the driver selects Piloted Drive and turns over driving to the vehicle, the car’s performance — from accelerating to braking to cornering — imitates the driver’s own style and preferences.

In Manual Drive mode, the driver has control. The linear acceleration and cornering are pure and exhilarating. Yet behind the scenes, the Nissan IDS Concept continues to provide assistance. Sensors continually monitor conditions and assistance is available even while the driver is in control. In the event of imminent danger, Nissan IDS Concept will assist the driver in taking evasive action.

In addition to learning, the Nissan IDS Concept’s AI communicates like an attentive partner. From information concerning traffic conditions, the driver’s schedule to personal interests, Nissan IDS Concept’s AI has what is needed to help create a driving experience that is comfortable, enjoyable and safe.

Nissan IDS Concept

Nissan IDS Concept

Nissan IDS Concept

Nissan IDS Concept

Nissan IDS Concept

Nissan IDS Concept

Nissan IDS Concept

Nissan IDS Concept

Design — Together, we ride

“A key point behind the Nissan IDS Concept is communication. For autonomous drive to become reality, as a society we have to consider not only communication between car and driver but also between cars and people. The Nissan IDS Concept’s design embodies Nissan’s vision of autonomous drive as expressed in the phrase together, we ride,” says Mitsunori Morita, Design Director.

Two interiors enable two ways for the driver to enjoy the experience
Together, we ride is clearly demonstrated in the interior design. “The Nissan IDS Concept has different interiors depending on whether the driver opts for Piloted Drive or Manual Drive. This was something that we thought was absolutely necessary to express our idea of autonomous drive,” says Morita.

Nissan IDS Concept

Nissan IDS Concept

Even though it is a hatchback, the Nissan IDS Concept’s long wheelbase enables comfortable seating space for four adults. But the cabin becomes even more spacious when the driver selects Piloted Drive. In this mode, the steering wheel recedes into the center of the instrument panel and a large flat screen comes out. Various driving-related operations are handled by AI, voice and gestures from the driver. The interior, which is comprised of natural materials such as mesh leather, is illuminated by soft light. All four seats rotate slightly inward, facilitating easier conversation. It’s like relaxing in a living room.

When the driver selects Manual Drive, the roomy interior transforms to put the driver in control. All seats face forward. The steering wheel, which takes styling cues from reins for horse riding, appears along with driving meters and a heads-up display that shows route and other driving information. Interior lighting switches to blue, stimulating the ability to concentrate. Nissan’s use of hollow-structure A-pillars helps ensure excellent visibility by reducing blind spots and also contributes to the feeling of open space.

“In every situation, it is about giving the driver more choices and greater control. And the driver will remain the focus of our technology development efforts,” Ghosn said at the show.

The transformation to Manual Drive can be carried out with ease through a switch between the front seats called the PD Commander. This is the only control the driver can physically operate when the car is in Piloted Drive: when the driver is ready to take over driving, a physical action should initiate the change.

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81 Comments on "Next Generation Nissan LEAF Illustrated In 60 kWH Nissan IDS Concept"

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ampzilla
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ampzilla

way cool !

Brian
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Brian

Am I the only one who doesn’t really care about automated driving at this point? I mean, I know it’s coming. I know it will eventually make our roads safer. But in a car like this, it feels more like a distraction from the more immediate question of the next generation Leaf.

I hope that they keep two features of this car for the Leaf – the 60kWh battery, and the significantly sportier design. Together, those might convince me to turn over a new Leaf rather than jump ship to the Bolt or Model III.

Draighven
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Draighven

I really couldn’t care less either, don’t want it don’t need it.

EVcarNut
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EVcarNut

Yea, You Me & 95% Of the others Couldn’t Care Less for Remote driving.. JUST GIVE ME AN EV THAT HAS GOOD RANGE,LOOKS GOOD, WORKS GOOD, & IS RELIABLE……

RexxSee
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RexxSee

PLUS ONE!

Ez
Guest
Ez

If it’ll lower insurances, I’m pretty sure people will be onboard. Humans are the most dangerous things on the roads.

Mike616
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Mike616

Yes. You’re the only one. The rest of us would like collision detection and prevention. To save our money and our lives.

bennyd
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bennyd

There are plenty more people who see to much tech in driving as occurs. When the price of a car become the price of a house and more debt, watch out…

Ez
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Ez

You need to think more long term than just handing out the cash to buy the car…

bennyd
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bennyd

There are plenty more people who see too much tech in driving as obsured. When the price of a car become the price of a house, and creates more debt, watch out…

EVcarNut
Guest
EVcarNut

I agree ,safety features like collision avoidance features are great & I welcome them, ABS saved My butt @ least one time be sure, but all this other technology? is it really necessary? Maybe it should be optional., it can drives the price sky high..

DonC
Guest
DonC

No doubt many don’t care but once you’ve had experience with various aspects of autonomous driving such as adaptive cruise control and so forth, you want more. One of those things that you when you don’t have it you don’t realize how much you want it.

Think smartphones. Who needed those?

Brian
Guest
Brian

It’s not that I want to NOT have it, it’s just that truly autonomous driving is farther off in the future. As much as I love to drive, I also love the idea of putting the car in autopilot on the Thruway, and turning around to spend time with my family. You can always take over control for the more interesting / fun roads to drive.

The more immediate question to me is the next-generation EV technology. There are some nice hints (like the 60kWh battery – and it looks like a very similar form factor to the current 24kWh one).

Regarding smartphones, while I will readily admit that I am addicted to my iPhone, I certainly don’t “need” it. In fact, if I am honest with myself, I have to admit that having an iPhone has lowered the quality of my life. It takes me away from engaging with others in my vicinity. It also fills my “gap time” in which I ponder the greater questions of life. Now that time is filled with meaningless things like Facebook MEMEs and Clash-of-Clans.

martinwinlow
Guest

Isn’t that what the ‘power’ button is for?

super390
Guest
super390

I personally agree, but this autonomous driving thing may be part of a generational transformation of people’s relationship to their cars. Young people today are used to letting computers and networks run their lives, so the traditional urge of the American man to “control” the machinery of his life may be losing its meaning. The freedom of the open road is being replaced with Apple’s creepy notion of the appliance you have an intimate relationship with. The car of the future is your slave and pal, like R2-D2. Note that R2-D2 hangs around with Luke, then gets in its silo in the X-Wing and helps him fly it.

RexxSee
Guest
RexxSee

For me, it’s more a question of the challenge to arrive to destination in a storm or on icy roads, the small rush of adrenalin, the warrior instinct to win the battle against the elements.

There will be an issue on how will we unwind our instinct of dealing with danger and death. Life will be depressing without driving my car myself.

Anon
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Anon

You’ll care when you can’t drive your self from the Nursing Home, to visit your Doctor / Pharmacy.

Brian
Guest
Brian

True, but when that happens to me in 40 years or so, autonomous driving will be old news. SO that’s the silver lining as far as I’m concerned; it will be available and established by the time I need or even want it. Right now I enjoy driving, and I want a car that I can drive.

Josh
Guest

Or just use Uber.

You know how much Nursing homes charge for those parking spots 😉

mr. M
Guest
mr. M

thanks, i rather drive the autonomous taxi 😉

Bill Howland
Guest
Bill Howland

Autonomous driving will be forced on laggards by insurance companies. They will say its too dangerous to drive the car yourself. Even in manual mode, to get an insurance discount, you’ll have to let the car take over.

Not to pick on Tesla, but since its been 10 years and they haven’t been able to get the doors working (next candidate: Falcon Wings), can you imagine being in a tesla where the steering wheel HALF reappeared out of the dash, and then shifted to manual mode except the wheel is still in the dash and you can’t steer? hehe.

I’d say 2025 (10 years hence) may be enough time to perfect this, but Nissan’s weak point so far has been batteries. Hopefully they do better with the autonomous stuff. This car, in today’s dollars, would be $150k. There is simply too much mechanical crap going in and out and swivelling. Plus zillions of not so cheap sensors everywhere.

So, with more standardization, maybe. The 60 kwh battery will be the easy part.

michael
Guest
michael

I love to drive, but I don’t ever want to HAVE TO do it again.

And once I spent enough time going places without driving, I’m not really sure I’d ever want to again.

Jay
Guest
Jay

You must have a short commute to work. In my twilight years of 12 hour work days, I’d be tickled to have a computer controlled car give me the option of being chauffeured home safely after dark. Fighting drowsiness and dodging truck tire carcasses in the roadway at 75 mph is a young man’s game that is no longer healthy nor fun for me.

Brian
Guest
Brian

True story. I chose to live close to work, and now my round-trip commute is 4.5 miles, if I take the “long” way (which I normally do, to avoid traffic).

DNAinaGoodWay
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DNAinaGoodWay

60 kWh! Nice! At $35, to compete?

super390
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super390

I doubt it. It looks like they’re either going to go upmarket from the old Leaf, or this car really has little to do with what’s coming: suicide doors, exotic glass roof, that retracted steering wheel in robot mode. They know what we want, but they may not be ready to give all of it to us.

mustang_sallad
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mustang_sallad

It’s a concept car. You have to use your imagination to figure out how this translates to a production next gen Leaf. The question about purchase price has more to do with battery economics than it does with how cool this concept car looks.

cHUNKYBUNS
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cHUNKYBUNS

I realise that it’s only a concept car but it is beautiful. If just the shape makes it to market I’d buy one.

Pushmi-Pullyu
Guest
Pushmi-Pullyu

Indeed, this is one of the most beautiful cars I’ve seen in my entire life. Of course there’s no way that they’re gonna put that into production, especially not at the price of the Leaf. But the design shows that it’s possible for a car to have large front end air scoops without taking an ugly hammer to it. And after seeing the Mirai, and a few other cars which seem to imitate the same ultra-uglified design, I didn’t think that was possible!

Mart
Guest
Mart

Well, it is a concept. The various scoops designed to improve airflow around the narrow tires will likely survive in production mode. Whether Nissan is ready for widespread adoption of carbon fiber is questionable. I suspect they might not go the way of BMW, but would possibly adapt a carbon-fiber reinforced injection molding.

michael
Guest
michael

BWAHAHAHA.

This thing is crazy ugly. Toyota Mirai level ugly. I guarantee you that most of it was designed by a “stylist” and not an engineer with a clue about aerodynamics.

The low height and the narrow tires help the cd, but the front corner scoops and the scoops in front of rear wheels are ridiculous.

Sure, it’s trendy, but it also has no class.

Not only that, all that angular design is far more difficult to manufacture. Temper it with some cost limitations, and it might actually be attractive.

I do like the center front area, and the extension of the windshield into the roof, though. Too bad the nice features are surrounded by so much ugly.

Too ugly, and lack of thermal management for the battery are what kept me from buying a Leaf. Looks like I still won’t be buying a Nissan soon, although I’d really love to support their commitment and vision.

Nick
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Nick

I think it looks pretty slick.

I guess looks really are subjective. 🙂

Stephen Hodges
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Stephen Hodges

Seems like the Mirai is now the styling standard…. ugh. So even BEV’s have to have giant air scoops. Some of the autopilot things do make sense, the braking/steering round obstacles, but I wonder if they will ever steer a course through a potholed road, which is a major skill in much of the world, and the cause of many a crash too.

Jay
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Jay

I see Datsun 240Z boldness in this design. Perhaps many folks thought the 240Z was homely in 1970 as well.

Alex
Guest
Alex

DRAG COEFFICIENT is industry LEADING 0,20, Model S 0,24!

Mart
Guest
Mart

When will regulation catch up to the lack of side-view mirrors? The B-pillar is a killer if digital cameras aren’t allowed.

EVcarNut
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EVcarNut

I’M SOLD!..NISSAN, Pulling 0ff an ELON MUSK…They’re Learning From THE BEST!..Now.., If they could only beat Elon to the Punch….Very impressive !….

Brian
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Brian

My hunch is that Nissan will be Tesla to market, but that GM will beat them both. At least in regards to the elusive affordable 200-mile BEV. GM doesn’t talk as much about autopilot, so I don’t know where they stand there. But as I said above, that’s not my concern right now.

DonC
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DonC

My guess is that GM will have the Bolt in late 2016, Nissan will have the new Leaf sometime in 2017, and Musk will still be tweeting in 2018.

Alan
Guest
Alan

Musk may have to move his schedule up !

How long would it take them to build the Mod lll if they could lay their hands on affordable batteries much sooner I wonder ?

The race is on !

mr. M
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mr. M

I think Musk will be able to deliver first founder cars in december 2017, so he can claim 2017 as start of delivery. Then the first 30.000 signature models (+ production ramp up) until August 2018. After that the Model 3P75D gets produced. Meaning at the middle of 2019 the first cars without dual drive and perfomance package will “Leaf” ^^ the production ramp.

Conclusion:
Start of delivery 2017 can still mean most peoploe will get their model 3 in 2019.

Mister G
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Mister G

Very nice. I would buy/lease for under $40k without federal credit.

EVGuy
Guest

Yaaaaaawwwwwwwwnnnnnnn. Yet another concept car, a look into a future that doesn’t exist, a car that won’t ever be produced (as presented) and another take on the not quite ready for prime time autonomous driving..

goaterguy
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goaterguy

You know that you just described the meaning of “Concept” right?

Draighven
Guest
Draighven

I’ll take a bit less weird mobile with my EV thanks. Not a huge fan of the design, but a production car would likely be toned down a bit from this, which could be acceptable. Not expecting a 60kwh pack in the next leaf for the current price. Maybe that’s why they are pushing 2018 instead of 2017 for gen 2 leaf, to let battery prices fall a bit more. Overall, interesting, glad Nissan is stepping up their game, but boiling it down, if the battery isn’t properly thermal managed, then I won’t even consider a Gen 2 Leaf no matter how good it is.

EVcarNut
Guest
EVcarNut

Yes! & stir counter clock wise 8 times. Cheers!

michael
Guest
michael

Yep – take away the ugly and add thermal management to the battery of the Leaf and I’d have one already.

I could probably overlook the ugly. Not as much ugly as this concept brings, but I agree it would probably be tempered to acceptable for production.

But again, if they don’t add thermal management to the battery, they’re still not getting my money.

Sublime
Guest
Sublime

On the screen:
“Would you like to share these pictures I’ve captured of your family and friends?”

This seems creepy at best and with the proper voice/emphasis scary in an extortion kind of way.

Nick
Guest
Nick

I tend to hear it in HAL’s voice. 🙂

Warren
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Warren

Having been to Japan, I haven’t laughed so hard in a long time. 🙂 “Together we respect”

Can you even imagine an American uttering that phrase? Get outta my way. I’m drivin’ here!!

JRMW
Guest
JRMW

Well I love it. Why can’t a production car look like this (exterior)?

I would buy it tomorrow if it had a 60k battery, this exterior, and a nice enough interior (like today’s Leaf even).
I’d be willing to pay in the $45k range too.

DonC
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DonC

Because no one would buy it! LOL

Nick
Guest
Nick

I would.

Anon
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Anon

Looks better than the current Leaf.

Sublime
Guest
Sublime

#lowbar

Anon
Guest
Anon

True dat.

And I understand that the designers and exec’s have to justify their paychecks and push design envelopes for trade shows… But this is so much more appealing to me, than the Leaf. Tone it down a bit, and it will sell quite well.

EVcarNut
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EVcarNut

Unlike the present leaflet .,this is a proper”EV”from the Ground Up..with the flat floor Etc:

przemo_li
Guest
przemo_li

Not gonna happen.

Actually its big fail on part of Nissan.

Tesla showed that luxury cars should have more then 60kWh to sell…

On the other hand they are welcome to 30-40k $ 200+ miles EV manufacturers club.

Its not like they are the only one who showcase product they wont be able to sell in that price range (nor with additional 10k ;P )

super390
Guest
super390

Well, a 4500 pound luxury car with an enormous frontal area needs more than 60 kwh. This looks to be one size class down, and the real car may be two sizes down like the current Leaf. So if they match the cD of the Tesla, with 4/5 the frontal area and 3/4 the weight, they might be using under 200 wh/mile and that’s enough battery. But then the current Leaf should already achieve that and it doesn’t.

Pushmi-Pullyu
Guest
Pushmi-Pullyu

Reality check: The Leaf has a frontal area of 7.8 sq. ft.; the Model S has 6.2 sq. ft.

That’s one of the ways the Model S achieves almost exactly the same energy efficiency, measured in miles per kWh, when the same EPA driving test is used.

The Model S doesn’t just look better, it’s better engineered.

http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1092373_aerodynamic-tesla-model-s-electric-car-wins-the-wind-tunnel-wars

Erwin
Guest
Erwin

Saying that all ev’s need over 60kwh battery is like saying all gas cars need 30+ gallon fuel tank. Different size, weight, power, efficiency and use require different capacities. An full size luxury sedan is going to require a lot bigger tank than a Fiat 500. A chevy Suburban might have a 31 gallon tank whereas a Mini Cooper has 11 gallon. Should we fit all Mini Coopers with a 30 gallon tank so they can compete with Chevy Suburban’s? Do we need to put an 85 kwh battery in a Leaf to give it the same range as Tesla model S?

Adrian
Guest
Adrian

Thanks, today it has been worthwhile to get up and look the livestream ;-), great concept!

Alan
Guest
Alan

I had heard about the 60kw battery about a week ago but didn’t know what the car actually looked like, apparently many of the features will stay (mainly lower profile for better aerodynamics), also the Mitsu crossover suv (next ASX) which is supposedly all electric with a range around 200 miles. Both due late 2017 in Europe so a little while longer to wait.

At least it’s finally going to happen so should put the rest of the auto makers on their heels.

DonC
Guest
DonC

Apparently the Nissan engineers spilled the beans that Nissan will be using LG Chem technology and that both Nissan and LG would be making the cells.

Perhaps we should re-evaluate what manufacturer is destined to receive the cells produced on the new line at the LG factory in Holland? Nissan was dismissed because production would be too limited but if Nissan is also producing the cells …

Jay Cole
Admin

Hey DonC,

Yes, this is turning into on of those ‘things that everyone knows, but Nissan isn’t saying’ moments again. I think this is just a re-confirmation though of the common knowledge – LG and Nissan/AESC building battery capacity together.

Like we mentioned earlier, it is likely that LG would be doing the entire cell production run on a regional level for Nissan – not globally mixe.

…our own speculation was that Nissan Euro battery production is a bit of a weak spot, and it made sense to expand on the current Renault supply agreement for cells on the next gen LEAF in Europe. Especially after talking to Nissan and them being very firm on US battery production plans in the future.

Holland only has ~500 mWh of spare capacity, which would net little more than 8,000 of these 60 kWh packs. One would think if LG was to get any magnitude of a deal in the US that it would need a facility much larger than the whole of what Holland is today.

DonC
Guest
DonC

You’re probably right. I was thinking Holland and Smyrna for US production, with Holland starting until Smyrna got up to speed with the new chemistry.

I think Nissan would have to use the same chemistry all over the world.

ModernMarvelFan
Guest
ModernMarvelFan

This actually might be the LEAF that I am willing to bet if they can back up the look with decent performance.

Make it happen, Nissan!

ModernMarvelFan
Guest
ModernMarvelFan

Not “bet”, but “willing to buy”…

Brian
Guest
Brian

That would be quite the turning point! I too am hoping they keep the sporty look and improve driving performance. That would be worth upgrading for.

ModernMarvelFan
Guest
ModernMarvelFan

It would also attract new potential buyers that didn’t want to look at EVs that lack performance in the similar price range.

Pete
Guest
Pete

This car is a revolution! Will sell like the hell, i am sure. 200.000 possible in 2017 ! Best would be 60 kWh for same price like 30 kWh, and two options with smaller battery and cheaper. Sure it’s a concept, but exterieur design, battery will make it in production. Wireless charging would be great for fleet customers.

Josh
Guest

I like the exterior styling, assuming it will be toned down for the production LEAF. The interior is just terrible, not a fan at all, but it is obvious that it will never be in a production car.

Oh, and please get rid of the suicide doors, they make it impossible to load kids/carseat in a garage. I might have an i3 right now if it wasn’t for the damn rear door.

Anon
Guest
Anon

Yeah, it needs a single LONG Falcon Wing door on each side. That would rock. 😉

JohnMB
Guest
JohnMB

I have an i3 for a year now and those doors well I have no problem loading up the kid or anything else..I really like them …just don’t understand what all the fuss is about..even Nissan sees its benefits.

Josh
Guest

We park two cars in a two car garage. Mine for the plug, my wife to keep the hair nice in the morning.

There is no way to open the front door, then open the suicide door, and get past the doors with the space between the vehicles.

I spent quite a bit of time in the showroom working out the kinematics.

Trace
Guest
Trace

Then pull it out into the driveway.

Dag Johansen
Guest
Dag Johansen

Nice.

How are you gonna DC fast charge it, Nissan? Chademo ain’t gonna cut it.

mr. M
Guest
mr. M

100kW Chademo should be fine and possible

Alex
Guest
Alex

Drag coefficient is indusry leading 0,20 !! Hope in production car we see 0,23.

Pushmi-Pullyu
Guest
Pushmi-Pullyu

Nissan claims a drag coefficient of 0.28 for the first-generation leaf, but Car & Driver tested it at 0.32. Is there any reason to trust the figures Nissan quotes for a “car” which exists only as a computer model?

At any rate, it’s irrelevant; this concept will never make it into production.

Krys
Guest
Krys

Keep the car and the gizmos, but I’ll take the 60kw/h battery in an i-miev or E-up please…