The Ram performs the dirty act not once, but twice.

This TeslaCam video captures a Ram Cummins diesel pickup truck in the act of purposely coal-rolling a Tesla Model 3 not once, but twice.

As you'll see in the video, a Tesla Model 3 is readying to merge onto the expressway. The Ram diesel pickup truck accelerates to get in front of the merging Model 3. Once in front of the Tesla, the Ram driver hits the go pedal to spew the sooty black exhaust into the air.

That was the first act of coal-rolling, but then the Ram gets ready to exit the highway and once again releases some of that pollution from its tailpipe at the Model 3.

Neither of tow coal-rolling acts seen here is as intense or intentional as some we've seen in the past, but still, it seems the Tesla was clearly the target, but why?

YouTube uploader WheEVee tells the story of what exactly happened:

A 2004 Dodge Ram 2500 Pickup w/ Cummins diesel decided to express his opinion about my Tesla Model 3. He comes in hot (as seen in left view), ready to exit AZ Loop 101 at Olive Ave. As I ready to merge from the Northern Ave. onramp, he gets into position (see front view), slows, gives it the beans, then has to slow to make the exit. Then, for good measure, they decide to roll once more to make sure I was sufficiently doused with unburnt fuel. If he hadn't needed to slow to make the exit, I might not have thought it was intentional...

What is it about Tesla drivers going about their day that makes diesel pickups want to smoke them out?

It's okay, I have the last laugh, AZ CGY2481, as you were caught on TeslaCam!

Bonus: Glorious onramp pull. Acceleration Boost never gets old!

Here at InsideEVs, we've witnessed a rising trend in attacks on Tesla vehicles. Though coal-rolling doesn't necessarily damage the Tesla, the emissions spewed into the air do significant harm to the environment and, at times, to the occupants of the vehicles targeted by the coal-rollers.

And yes, the act of coal rolling (modifying a diesel engine to emit all sorts of crap) is illegal in most (if not all) U.S. states, it's just not always enforced.

What's rolling coal? Well, it's something us EV drivers can't do, but if you want a quick definition, then here ya go:

Rolling coal is the practice of modifying a diesel engine to increase the amount of fuel entering the engine in order to emit large amounts of black or grey sooty exhaust fumes into the air.